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mold making for cases
Posted by: fly ()
Date: January 29, 2011 02:54PM

I've been working on cases. I want mold some paper to make covers using epoxy steel impressions. The first round didn't go too well, I feel like it was a little cold for the epoxy.Would warming in hot water help soften the epoxy?
I'm following Rays case making guide posted years ago.
I'm using Loctite 82093, from Mcmaster carr. Ray are you out there?

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Re: mold making for cases
Posted by: J0B00 ()
Date: January 29, 2011 07:58PM

Once the Part A and Part B are mixed together, it probably lets heat out as it cures... If you decide to try heating the epoxy, warm part A and part B separately before mixing it...

You could also give my method a try (search the forums...its out there), but its more involved and requires different materials that you'll have to special order, but for making paper impressions I would imagine it would work great.


Also, there is another epoxy steel putty that you might want to check around for that may work better for you... Its called "PC-7 Epoxy Paste" and is a spreadable paste that is sort of like JB Weld, but a bit thicker so it won't drip.

Just a few ideas...

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Re: mold making for cases
Posted by: Ray Morgenweck ()
Date: January 29, 2011 11:24PM

Pretty much any epoxy putty will work. It does need to be at room temperature. I think the problem you may be having is related to not having equal pressure when you make the 'squeeze'. Its very important. Tell me exactly what is happening and Ill try to help you out



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/30/2011 12:46PM by Ray Morgenweck.

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Re: mold making for cases
Posted by: fly ()
Date: January 30, 2011 01:38PM

Thanks Ray, I enjoy your imput and colorful delivery.
I think my problem lies in getting the epoxy putty mixed enough and getting enough pressure. Both my mat, preserver and case are borrowed,so I'm trying not to destroy them. I was also trying to mold the mat and preserver all in one for
ambrotypes, then I would put a spacer,or tape for tintypes.
I'm putting the epoxy on masonite, sandwiched between 3/4 ply woodand pressed
with wood working clamps all around, or I could just do a big c clamp in the middle.The first ones I did it was maybe 40 degressF, so I'm going to heat this one up to around 90 and see if that helps,even after 3 day its still not stiff
as if it unmixed it self.... I'll try again.
If the next round , doesen't yield a decent impression I'm going to change
epoxys , I'll look up that "pc-7"thanks Andy.
I'm waiting on as second case to arrive that might be better, to copy.
I'm working on cases for Quarter plates.
Thanks

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Re: mold making for cases
Posted by: Ray Morgenweck ()
Date: January 30, 2011 01:56PM

If youre working on quarter plate or smaller die impressions, a Kelsey printing press is VERY GOOD at getting even and heavy pressure. These are fairly cheap and come in a few sizes. While its rather easy just using a big rubber mallet to do the copper foil impressions, the paper/mucilage sandwich will take the even and strong pressure of the Kelsey press to get a good impression.

Id not be doing the mat and preserver all in one.

the best mats are the solid ones, preservers NEED to be first filled on the back with epoxy, or they will crush.

Pressure to make the mold, one C clamp in the middle will NOT work.It needs to be fully even all around. I made one one time by using a trolly jack and the frame of my Studebaker. I made a few heavy plywood blocks to even pressures, and then put the die/mold set between these block, put them on top of the trolly jack and used about a half ton of upward pressure. It worked well and was one of my best dies.

Pretty much to make case cover molds, for paper stamping, you will need to take apart the original case and seperate the top from the side rails, smooth the back and stick this onto the male die half. cover with saran wrap and press into the epoxy steel. after it is fully hardened, remove the original case part, apply more epoxy steel to the male half, and press well and evenly as mentioned above until the epoxy steel oozes out. when it is hardened, you can pop this apart and the die should be good to go.

I see no way of really doing this well without taking apart the case.

The brass mat or preserver, the original, is left epoxied (5 minute, not epoxy steel) to the male half of that die set, only the female part is epoxy steel.

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Re: mold making for cases
Posted by: fly ()
Date: January 30, 2011 07:14PM

good advice all around, thanks, I'll keep at it as soon as I get a case of my own.

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Re: mold making for cases
Posted by: Ray Morgenweck ()
Date: January 30, 2011 09:52PM

A good place to hunt for case parts is at the old fashioned photo show, where the tables of old Minoltas go unsold....a lot of image dealers/collectors have a junkbox which is exactly what you want to be rummaging through.

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Re: mold making for cases
Posted by: fly ()
Date: February 06, 2011 01:08PM

Up date, 2ns round of mold went well. As Ray said lots of pressure.
Soaking the epoxy in warm water made it much easier to mix. I'll post some pic of the final cases. Thanks

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Re: mold making for cases
Posted by: cepaw ()
Date: April 02, 2011 12:35PM

Hi fly, I can send you some case tops to work with. I have quite a few designs. They will be made out of resin, very strong compared to an original and it's just the top so you won't have to cut off the side rails to work with them. Take a look at my site and see if there is anything you would like.
Mike
www.moderndayantique

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Re: mold making for cases
Posted by: fly ()
Date: April 07, 2011 11:23AM

Thanks Mike!

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