Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 43

Thread: Field Embalming Demo Photos (Kid Friendly)

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    West Peoria, IL
    Posts
    115

    Default Response to 1st Sgt P

    Sir:

    Thanks for your comments; I really appreciate your observations from within the funeral profession. I'm actually the exceutive director of the funeral museum in Springfield, IL, which was created by the IL Funeral Directors Assn. You may have read about us in the funeral trade press or seen me at the National convention. I'm a historian who's been studying your profession full-time for the past seven years.

    I'd strongly encourage you to consider creating a CW field embalmer impression. There are too few out there today, which led us to create our personas as a component of our educational programming efforts. By combining your inside knowledge of modern practices and human physiology along with historical practices, you could become one of the best in reenacting. If I can assist, please let me know. We could save you years of research time and guide you to watch for the proper instruments and equipment.
    I remain as ever, your faithful & obedient servant,

    Jon Austin

    aka Benjamin Franklin Lyford, M.D.
    Drs. Chamberlain & Lyford, Principal Embalming Surgeons
    Washington City, D. C.

    Adservio mortuus quidnam es non potens adservio ipsum

    Traveling with while in the field:
    Mid-States Living History Association, Indianapolis, IN
    10th Illinois Cavalry Regiment, Springfield, IL
    The Society of Civil War Surgeons

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    West Peoria, IL
    Posts
    115

    Default Military/Civilian Waistcoats

    John,

    Thanks for the information. I've incorrectly assumed that waistcoats were "issued" garments for the officer class especially when adorned with brass, eagle and shield buttons. I was aware that the high-button style could be civilian. When I saw it in a sutler's tent, I recognized the quality wool, full lining, careful detailling, and hand-sewn button holes as signs of a high quality garment. It spoke to me, and the price was a bargain compared to the other waistcoats hanging beside it that were clearly of lower quality and marked at a higher cost. I reasoned that in portraying a Philadelphia-educated MD who'd likely spent time in NY and now lives in DC, my clothing should be well-tailored, which is why I constructed the rest of the wardrobe for me and my embalming partner so that I could control the quality and be as accurate as possible. I figured that the buttons could be exchanged when I found others that would be appropriate. I'll re-think this.
    I remain as ever, your faithful & obedient servant,

    Jon Austin

    aka Benjamin Franklin Lyford, M.D.
    Drs. Chamberlain & Lyford, Principal Embalming Surgeons
    Washington City, D. C.

    Adservio mortuus quidnam es non potens adservio ipsum

    Traveling with while in the field:
    Mid-States Living History Association, Indianapolis, IN
    10th Illinois Cavalry Regiment, Springfield, IL
    The Society of Civil War Surgeons

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    962

    Default

    "DC" should be referred to as "Washington City" if you are doing any first-person.
    Noah Briggs

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    West Peoria, IL
    Posts
    115

    Default Washington City, DC

    Noah,

    You're too good! Keeping us on our toes... We have that covered already. Rest assured that "Washington City, D. C." is on the repro business cards--copied from an embalmer's card in the Museum's collection. It never hurts to remind, though!
    I remain as ever, your faithful & obedient servant,

    Jon Austin

    aka Benjamin Franklin Lyford, M.D.
    Drs. Chamberlain & Lyford, Principal Embalming Surgeons
    Washington City, D. C.

    Adservio mortuus quidnam es non potens adservio ipsum

    Traveling with while in the field:
    Mid-States Living History Association, Indianapolis, IN
    10th Illinois Cavalry Regiment, Springfield, IL
    The Society of Civil War Surgeons

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    962

    Default

    Since you are portraying an officer you are allowed leeway in your clothing. Officers were required to purchase their own uniforms. Many of them got finely tailored garments while in town. Others simply drew enlisted men's uniforms straight from the QM, or a combination of both. Hence you see wide variations in uniform styles and quality as you crank through the LOC galleries.

    By Chancellorsville many officers had switched to regular enlisted uniforms or custom-pimped fatigue blouses (erroneously called "sack coats" by most reenactors). They also started wearing what we would call today "subdued insignia", ie, insignia which is smaller and has to be seen up close in order to determine the rank. Officers did this in an effort to cut down on the possibility of being targeted to disrupt the regiment's chain of command. The subdued insignia was officially allowed by Gettysburg.

    Thus, you seeing the fine quality waistcoat amidst the dreck and wearing variations of officer's uniforms is perfectly "legal" for your impression. I think you could incorporate the "Origins of My Waistcoat" story into your impression by modifying the wordage - not necessarily "sutlers"; instead "at the ready-made store".

    We are having too much fun this afternoon.
    Noah Briggs

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    962

    Default

    This is probably a long shot, but perhaps you and your companion could put together some sort of Power Point presntation of a "by-the-book" field embalming procedure. That would give those of us not in the know a good idea of how it was done, especially since the medical staff sent a lot of business your way.
    Noah Briggs

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    West Peoria, IL
    Posts
    115

    Default Embalming Demo on Video

    Noah,

    You're not far off the mark. A CW reenactor who portrays Grant also happens to be a licensed funeral director here in IL. I believe that it was he who this past Summer casually suggested that we create a video for the funeral directors to demonstrate the process from the early years of the modern profession. I'm thinking a sort of "Your Are There" type production, definitely not in the style of "The Blair Witch Project" but something with a bit more polish that we could produce ourselves. Well, I see another Winter project on the horizon.

    Before proceeding, I'd be curious to know whether others with medical impressions would also be interested in viewing such a video (or sequence of closely-spaced stills) of the preparation process. What say?
    I remain as ever, your faithful & obedient servant,

    Jon Austin

    aka Benjamin Franklin Lyford, M.D.
    Drs. Chamberlain & Lyford, Principal Embalming Surgeons
    Washington City, D. C.

    Adservio mortuus quidnam es non potens adservio ipsum

    Traveling with while in the field:
    Mid-States Living History Association, Indianapolis, IN
    10th Illinois Cavalry Regiment, Springfield, IL
    The Society of Civil War Surgeons

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    So. Indiana
    Posts
    176

    Default And so it goes

    Quote Originally Posted by funhistory
    Gentlemen:

    As suggested last week, I've posted several photos from the past season's events. The images can be viewed at http://usera.imagecave.com/funhistory. I included the "kid friendly" notation just to reassure the timid that the images are safe for viewing.
    Who'd of thunk that from the above, we would have developed such an interesting and complicated thread (or web)? If it were available, I'd like a copy of a word .doc that outlines civil war embalming, misconceptions of the Victorian and present era and the like for my ever increasing note binder. I could piece together some things from this thread I suppose. I just like things orderly. If there is no such animal, however, I certainly don't want to put one through the work of organizing such a thing.

    I think we all appreciate the information that has been imparted to us thus far.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    388

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by bizzilizzit
    The term "casket" was used to describe something that held someone's treasure(s). In the 19th century, jewelry and trinket boxes were called caskets. Coffins later became known as caskets, as they held something we treasured most - our dear departed loved one.

    "Look at the coffin,
    With golden handles.
    Isn't it grand, boys,
    To be bloody well dead?

    Let's not have a sniffle.
    Let's have a bloody good cry,
    And always remember the longer you live,
    The sooner you'll bloody well die."

    -Isn't It Grand, Boys: Traditional : popularized by The Clancy Brothers & (the late)Tommy Makem

    I couldn't resist. Its one of my favorite sing-along (with a beverage in hand) tunes. For the other verses, see http://www.irish-song-lyrics.com/Isn...and_Boys.shtml
    Last edited by jthlmnn; 10-31-2007 at 08:46 PM. Reason: Does everything have to have a reason?
    \"Die Gedanken sind frei\"

    John Thielmann

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    South Louisiana
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by funhistory
    Sir:

    Thanks for your comments; I really appreciate your observations from within the funeral profession. I'm actually the exceutive director of the funeral museum in Springfield, IL, which was created by the IL Funeral Directors Assn. You may have read about us in the funeral trade press or seen me at the National convention. I'm a historian who's been studying your profession full-time for the past seven years.

    I'd strongly encourage you to consider creating a CW field embalmer impression. There are too few out there today, which led us to create our personas as a component of our educational programming efforts. By combining your inside knowledge of modern practices and human physiology along with historical practices, you could become one of the best in reenacting. If I can assist, please let me know. We could save you years of research time and guide you to watch for the proper instruments and equipment.
    Thank you Jon for your encouragement and offer to help me on this impression. I am not getting any younger as a soldier,so this might be a venture to challenge. The other part of this is expenses. I would have to make slight changes to my clothing. I would have to purchase items pertaining to this impression,which by the way you just don't find at any old sutler tent. I do though have something that others that have protrayed this impression don't have. My cousin and his family owns the funeral home here in my hometown. They still have the horse drawn hearse. I have years of experience with horses and teams (I grew up out in the country with every conceivable farm animal at one time or another,including horses all the time and wagon mules). People wonder why I don't do cavalry.Wouldn't that be something to show up with that?
    I will definitely be in contact with you very soon on equipment questions.
    P.L. Parault




    "Three score and ten I can remember well, within the volume of which time I have seen hours dreadful and things strange: but this sore night hath trifled former knowings."


    William Shakespeare

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •