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Thread: Field Embalming Demo Photos (Kid Friendly)

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    West Peoria, IL
    Posts
    115

    Default Undertaking & Embalming

    James,

    Welcome to the Forum. I believe that you'll find our fellow reenactors to be quite helpful as you develop your impression and head to the field. Experience tells me that the topics above are considered fascinating by our colleagues here; so, be prepared for many questions. Please feel free to weigh in with any corrections and clarifications as needed in the interest of setting the record straight. Despite eight years of study devoted to your profession, I continue to amazed at how much more there is to learn.
    I remain as ever, your faithful & obedient servant,

    Jon Austin

    aka Benjamin Franklin Lyford, M.D.
    Drs. Chamberlain & Lyford, Principal Embalming Surgeons
    Washington City, D. C.

    Adservio mortuus quidnam es non potens adservio ipsum

    Traveling with while in the field:
    Mid-States Living History Association, Indianapolis, IN
    10th Illinois Cavalry Regiment, Springfield, IL
    The Society of Civil War Surgeons

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    58

    Default

    What a fascinating subject. Thank you. Mike

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Southeast Tennessee
    Posts
    25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Parault
    I make a case for the reason behind the practice, first, by asking to what "other" methods of keeping insects off the bodies are you referring? Since the use of borates as a method of pest control did not occur until the 1870's (http://www.abcpest.com/houston/pestborate.html) and because, after hours of searching online I can only find references to agricultural practices of pest control (not to say other references do no exist) I am curious to know what other methods of pest contol there were at the time.
    For what it is worth I have also read that the use of greenery was to mask the odor of decomposing bodies and/or to draw insects away much like flowers were. Jon Austin and I have discussed the use of an insecticide called Thymol that was added to embalming fluids with the thoughts that it would find its way to the surface and ward off insects. Maybe Jon can share some more in depth information, he is very knowledgable about the chemicals and their uses.
    Last edited by undertaker78; 11-01-2008 at 12:06 PM.
    Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
    J.A. Staton, Undertaker

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