Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Musketoon vs Carbine

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    142

    Default Musketoon vs Carbine

    What's the difference? What exactly distinguishes one from the other?

  2. #2

    Default

    Hallo!

    In brief... none.

    They are one of the very loose or casual use of the terms in the Period... akin to "rifle" when it was a musket... or "musket" when it was a rifle-musket"....or "rifled-musket" when it was a rifle-musket.

    But, in general...musketoon seems to be an older usage.

    Part of the problem comes out of the old British tradition where the difference was not based on length, but rather whether it was "musket bore" of .75 or "carbine bore" of .65.

    Still being really brief here...

    The U.S. made a shift between musketoon and carbine with the Model 1847 Musketoon series which were .69 smoothbore. Next was the Model 1855 Rifled Carbine and M1855 Pistol-Carbine in the new .58 caliber.

    Curt
    Last edited by Curt-Heinrich Schmidt; 03-07-2017 at 01:25 PM.
    In gleichem Schritt und Tritt, Curt Schmidt

    Not a real Civil War reenactor, I only portray one on boards and fora.
    I do not portray a Civil War soldier, I merely interpret one.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    142

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Curt-Heinrich Schmidt View Post
    Hallo!

    In brief... none.

    They are one of the very loose or casual use of the terms in the Period... akin to "rifle" when it was a musket... or "musket" when it was a rifle-musket"....or "rifled-musket" when it was a rifle-musket.

    But, in general...musketoon seems to be an older usage.

    Part of the problem comes out of the old British tradition where the difference was not based on length, but rather whether it was "musket bore" of .75 or "carbine bore" of .65.

    Still being really brief here...

    The U.S. made a shift between musketoon and carbine with the Model 1847 Musketoon series which were .69 smoothbore. Next was the Model 1855 Rifled Carbine and M1855 Pistol-Carbine in the new .58 caliber.

    Curt
    That sounds like a pretty clear explanation of ill defined nomenclature. Thanks.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •