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Thread: Late war smoothbores ?

  1. #11
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    Based on surviving records, the 4th. Texas Infantry was issued eleven .69 muskets, bayonets, and scabbards on April 30, 1864. The regiment was also issued 365 .69 cartridges at the same time.
    Bill Rodman, If you need a really bad example.
    King of Prussia, PA
    wrodman1@aol.com

  2. #12
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    Interesting that they would be issued smoothbores so late in the war. I wonder if they were requested or thats all that was available .

    Peter Griebel

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Griebz View Post
    Interesting that they would be issued smoothbores so late in the war. I wonder if they were requested or thats all that was available .

    Peter Griebel
    In April the regiment returned to Va. with the rest of Longstreets men. Perhaps smoothbores were all that was available at the time and place of the supply and the spring campaign season was about to get underway. Just a WAG on my part.
    Jim Mayo
    Member of the old vets mess.

    http://www.angelfire.com/ma4/j_mayo/index.html

  4. #14
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    Tried to find the citation in my books, but couldn't. From memory, some units(Confederate and Union) preferred the old .69 cal. muskets because their experience in combat was close up. They could fire more projectiles from a single shot from a buck and ball round vs. a single mine round making it a hot time for the opposing side. This was true throughout the entire war.
    Marc Shaffer
    semper ubi sub ubi

  5. #15
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    From the ordnance records I have seen, it seems like\there were always a few .69 smoothbores in the ranks of the line regiments at any one time. This is a guess on my part but it seems that these guns were often given to new conscripts or men joining back from hospital for whom modern rifled arms were not available. The further south and west you go the more likely you will find .69 arms. IIRC, even as late as April 1864 11% of the Army of Tennessee was still armed with smoothbores.

    Will MacDonald

  6. #16

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    Hallo!

    IMHO...

    That "classic' story is best reflected in the Irish Brigade, (sands the 28th MASS who were Enfield armed) , where their history books speak to the men and officers fussing when they had to turn in their M1842's for M1863 Springfields in the spring of 1864 as a favorite tactic was closing close with buck-and-ball loads (example Meagher at Antietam firing at "30 paces").

    Curt
    In gleichem Schritt und Tritt, Curt Schmidt

    Not a real Civil War reenactor, I only portray one on boards and fora.
    I do not portray a Civil War soldier, I merely interpret one.

  7. #17
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    As to why the South would be issuing obsolete long arms in 1864-5, please remember that the Confederacy's best arsenal was captured US long arms left on the field of battle.

    There is the classic anecdote about soldiers marching north after Chancellorsville and remarking on the glint of rifles and bayonets gleaming in the moonlight from obsolete smoothbores swapped-out by the victors.

    After 1863, it was the North that usually held the field of battle following an engagement, and the acquisition of rifled muskets from capture declined precipitously. With the Blockade all but a stranglehold on imports, the South would have had to fall back on whatever it could scrounge.
    Bill Cross
    Treasurer, The Rowdy Pards

    'In the end, it's the history, stupid. If you can't document it, forget about it. And no amount of tomfoolery can explain away anything that makes history (and living historians) look stupid and wrong."

  8. #18
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    In the General Lee hq museum in Gettysburg there is a later model Charleville that was found on after the battle. It was chopped down so my guess is it was a cavlary arm. It shocked me because I picked the exact same gun up at a civil war show.
    Bill Hein

    Pvt

    Bledsoes Missouri battery.

  9. #19
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    By late model Charleville do you mean Model 1777 and later, or Model 1763-1766 type?
    Tim Surprenant
    Holmes' Brigade
    Battalion of the Common Soldiers

    Camp Randall Armory
    Maker of Contractor Lockplates for M1861 Rifle-Muskets and NC State Rifles
    www.camprandallarmory.com

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