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Thread: Binder's Boards...What were they used for?

  1. #1
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    Default Binder's Boards...What were they used for?

    I have seen an item called "binder's boards" referred to in period medical invoices, and I believe they are included in the list of items supplied with a Field Surgeon's Companion. I have yet to be able to find mention of these however, in Woodward's The Hospital Steward's Manual, or J.J. Chisholm's A Manual of Military Surgery. Does anyone know what these items were used for?
    Auxilium meum a Domino

  2. #2
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    Mark...

    Binders Boards were generally used for making a splint..

    So called because they are basicly the same dense millboard product more commonly associated with book bindings. Found to be of favor as cheap and light weight temporary splinting material. They can be used as is or lightly dampened and rolled/shaped to meet the desired need, while still maintaining a degree of rigidity.
    Lieut Frederick Sineth
    14th Virginia Infantry Regt Co.I
    - 106th Penna Vol Co.F

    - Pegrams Va Artillery
    - 150th Sailors Creek

  3. #3
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    That is what I had guessed their function to be based on the one size I had seen listed of 4" x 18". Have you found the use as splints cited in any of the period literature? Thanks for the reply.

    Mark Britton
    Auxilium meum a Domino

  4. #4
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    Mark
    ... Yes the use actually pre-dates the war and also can be found in instructionals of civilian practice, that was an orthopedic carry over into the military. This was a cheap alternative, and apparently found easier to store and transport on the field than say the rigid shaped wooden patented splints such as those made by "Day", etc. Heres at least one period mention for reference....

    Common pasteboard, cardboard or the stout millboard used by bookbinders, constitute invaluable domestic resorts, since they can be generally found in the house..... if in no other way pasteboard may generally be had at the expense of some paper box or of the loose cover of some old book. For small bones the thinner sheets afford a sufficent support; but for the large bones the thick binders board is necessary. In preparing the latter for use it can be moistened with water.... This splint may be applied to the limb without the interposition of anything but a few folds of muslin cloth or a piece of flannel. It must be bound to the limb by the roller while it is still moist and as it dries speedily it forms a smooth, firm, and reliable splint.

    A Practical Treatise on Fractures & Dislocations, by Frank Hamilton MD, 1860, pg.58
    Last edited by Frederick14Va; 03-22-2013 at 11:16 AM.
    Lieut Frederick Sineth
    14th Virginia Infantry Regt Co.I
    - 106th Penna Vol Co.F

    - Pegrams Va Artillery
    - 150th Sailors Creek

  5. #5
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    Tennessee
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    Thanks Frederick..that is exactly the sort of thing I was looking for.

    Mark Britton
    Auxilium meum a Domino

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