Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Coachman's Hat

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    35

    Default Coachman's Hat

    I have read in multiple places that Coachman's Hats ddn't come into being, or become popular, until the late 1800's (1870's or 1880's?). However, I have seen a couple of Civil War era photographs showing men wearing vrtually the same style hat, regardless of what they were called. In the past, I have received conflicting feedback on this question as to whether a Coachman's Hat would be appropriate to wear as a Civil War era civilian? So, I'm going to give it one more shot and see what the knowledgeable folks on this forum have to say. Thanks!

  2. #2

    Default

    In the interest of all of us referring to the same style of hat, would you post or link a picture of what you are terming a "coachman's hat."
    -Elaine Kessinger

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    548

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elaine Kessinger View Post
    In the interest of all of us referring to the same style of hat, would you post or link a picture of what you are terming a "coachman's hat."
    What she said.
    Galen Wagner
    Yellowhammer Rifles
    Past Master, Oak Park # 864 F&AM
    Montgomery, AL

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Coachman's Hat as represented by Gentlemen's Emporium:

    http://www.gentlemansemporium.com/store/000397.php

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley
    Posts
    410

    Default

    Fred, With all due respect, you would be well served in looking at other vendors than Gentleman's Emporium. They provide decent "period costumes" but not authentic garments/headwear. There are numerous quality vendors both here and on the Authentic Campaigner forums and very knowledgeable people who can guide you in the right direction. Question is do you want to appear like a period prop or actually attempt to portray a person from this particular historical era? The answer will determine the direction you take.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by doughboy View Post
    Fred, With all due respect, you would be well served in looking at other vendors than Gentleman's Emporium. They provide decent "period costumes" but not authentic garments/headwear. There are numerous quality vendors both here and on the Authentic Campaigner forums and very knowledgeable people who can guide you in the right direction. Question is do you want to appear like a period prop or actually attempt to portray a person from this particular historical era? The answer will determine the direction you take.
    As to the concensus concerning Gentlemen's Emporium, believe me, I get it! They were one of those vendors I was recommended to when I was just getting into reenacting. Since then, I have purchased items from a variety of vendors with more credible reputations for authenticity. Additional time and experience, through personal research and seeking input from seasoned reeanctors, have allowed me to be far more discriminating and accumulate a pretty good list of well-respected sutlers over the last couple of years. Not unlike many these days, money is rather tight, so if I can salvage anything I purchased early on in my ignorance without seriously compromising the integrity of my impression or the hobby, I will try to do that. If I find it cannot reasonably be done, then I just don't wear them at events, anymore, and that's that! Therefore, I am not ashamed to expose my ignorance in order to obtain good counsel and information from reenacting veterans such as yourself, and countless others on this, and other forums.

  7. #7

    Default

    I have seen hats in that style credited to the 1860s era, too. Remember that there is a difference between "available" and "popular." A style might be introduced in the 1860s, but not become "dirt common to all society" until the 1870s.
    -Elaine Kessinger

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elaine Kessinger View Post
    I have seen hats in that style credited to the 1860s era, too. Remember that there is a difference between "available" and "popular." A style might be introduced in the 1860s, but not become "dirt common to all society" until the 1870s.
    True! As in the case of the coachman's hat, or style, from what I have read, it did not become popular until the 1870's or 1880's, at least in this country. But, based upon a of couple period photos I have seen, apparently, they were available at an earlier time, at least in style, regardless of what they were actually called at the time. Thanks!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley
    Posts
    410

    Default

    Fred, Sounds like you have a good plan. Best of luck.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley
    Posts
    410

    Default

    While I can't really give an accurate review of the Gentleman's Emporium hat, I would recommend this as one well made alternative:

    http://www.clearwaterhats.com/default.htm

    A proper hat of this type would almost certainly have been lined and made of fur felt not wool felt . For the price I would be of the opinion that the GE hat is wool felt which won't hold up in weather, and the lack of liner will make the hat hotter and lose its shape faster. If you have questions you would be encouraged to ask the maker. Most will give answers freely and happily. If they can't give an answer that satisfies you, go somewhere else.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •