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Thread: Shell Jkt -v- Roundabout

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Long Island
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    186

    Default Shell Jkt -v- Roundabout

    I've going going through older posts and hoave not found an answer to my question. So, I thought I would throw it out to the members.

    What is the difference between a Shell Jacket and a Roundabout? I have seen the terms used and seen pictures of them on various websites, but I still cannot see a difference. I know some of the Officers wear a version of them.

    Thanks,
    John Ferrannini
    Surgeon, 67th NY, 1st long Island Vols.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bedford, Virginia
    Posts
    487

    Default

    They are the same, just who uses which may vary. Roundabout is what a civilian would call a short jacket. The branch trimmed and slightly longer jacket as worn by mounted troops in the US Army is a Uniform Jacket not a shell, shell jackets are shorter and in the US Army predate the other. It is all just semantics and in practical terms and reports the term gets interchanged freely. Think of it like this: you are a civilian or sailor or older non veteran of the Mexican War you use Roundabout, you are a veteran of the Mexican War or want to appear military you call it a Shell Jacket, you are Regular Army or taught by someone from the Regulars you call it a Uniform Jacket. This mostly applies to Federals. Just like calling a musket a gun this is more of a modern distinction that wasn't of much concern in the actual time period. Other people will have other ideas, if they post them then sort through and then look it up elsewhere, you will find an unsatisfactory answer with enough effort.
    Boyd Miles

    I dream of a world where a chicken can cross a road without having its motives called into question.

  3. #3

    Default

    Hallo!

    As shared...

    It is all part of a mix of formal terms, informal, popular terms, jargon, and different people using them... which can vary by user or over time. Especially among reenactors.

    Much the same way there are muskets, rifled-muskets, rifle-muskets, rifles, carbines, and musketoons without a universal standard of usage. (Or the bit about a "gun" being a cannon not small arms)

    A dress hat can also be a Hardee or Kossuth hat. A dress coat can be a frock coat. A fatigue blouse can be a sack coat. A mounted services pattern jacket can be a shell jacket.
    Etc., etc., and so on and so forth, and what have you.



    Curt
    In gleichem Schritt und Tritt, Curt Schmidt

    Not a real Civil War reenactor, I only portray one on boards and fora.
    I do not portray a Civil War soldier, I merely interpret one.

  4. #4

    Default

    "And all they ever found was his shoes and roundabout.
    And the Gobbelins'll get you, IF YOU DON'T WATCH OUT!"

    Seems to have survived the war by several years as a term for a child's jacket.
    Rob Weaver
    Pine River Boys, Co I, 7th Wisconsin
    "We're... Christians, what read the Bible and foller what it says about lovin' your enemies and carin' for them what despitefully use you -- that is, after you've downed 'em good and hard."
    -Si Klegg and His Pard Shorty

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bedford, Virginia
    Posts
    487

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    A little more to confuse and enlighten: http://ranawayfromthesubscriber.blog...ckets-and.html
    Boyd Miles

    I dream of a world where a chicken can cross a road without having its motives called into question.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    438

    Default

    Curt, I was under the impression that there were standards of usage for the terms "muskets, rifled-muskets, rifle-muskets, rifles . . .". I thought each term described a specific type of arm.
    Frank Brower

  7. #7

    Default

    Hallo!

    "I was under the impression that there were standards of usage for the terms "muskets, rifled-muskets, rifle-muskets, rifles . . .". I thought each term described a specific type of arm."

    In brief...

    Moreso today, but not with any 100% universal standard and no means of "enforcement." For example, we often read on boards, or hear in conversations referring to arms such as P1853's or M1855/61/63 that are "rifle muskets" as "rifled muskets." Or artillerists fuss when infantry says "guns."

    In a less literate CW era, lads were often worse, referring to their "rifle-muskets" as "rifles." Etc., etc.

    One would, may be should, expect Ordnance folks to do better. Most times they do, but not always.
    The 1863 Confederate Ordnance Manual lists the "Rilfe Musket, model 1855" but then lists the "Rifle Musket, model 1842." And the "Rifle, model of 1855." But then "Rifle, model of 1842." (Some blame the ordnance officers, some blame it on typesetters. )

    Curt
    In gleichem Schritt und Tritt, Curt Schmidt

    Not a real Civil War reenactor, I only portray one on boards and fora.
    I do not portray a Civil War soldier, I merely interpret one.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    64

    Default

    I know from reproductions that shell jackets had 12 buttons where roundabouts had only 9 button down the front. So, there is a slight difference. I have just been looking at repros online and my eyes most likely deceive me, the collar on the roundabout looks a bit shorter.
    ďAn officer who is not a good horseman is not worth for any Military purpose the powder sufficient to shoot him,"-Quartermaster General Thomas Jesup, 1844.

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