Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Staid vs. Stayed

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    106

    Default Staid vs. Stayed

    Minor English question here - in diary entries from the war I keep seeing 'staid' used instead of 'stayed', for example, "Last night I staid at Mr. Green's house." Was staid taught back then, or just a common misspelling? One diarist is Horatio Nelson Taft, a very educated man and personal friend of the president, and he uses staid frequently. Was this just a language quirk of the time?
    Scott Lawalin
    Pvt., 49th Indiana

    "You say that it is your custom to burn widows. Very well. We also have a custom: when men burn a woman alive, we tie a rope around their necks and we hang them. Build your funeral pyre; [then] beside it, my carpenters will build a gallows. You may follow your custom. And then we will follow ours." - General Sir James Napier

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    West Wyoming, PA
    Posts
    26

    Default

    You peaked my curiousity. Dictionary.com has two meanings for it, adjective and verb. The verb form describes as follows:

    Archaic. a simple past tense and past participle of stay

    So, it looks like it was just a common spelling of the time
    Scott Mecca
    143rd Pennsylvania Inf. Co A
    Union Volunteers

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rancho San Rafael, Republic of the Pacific
    Posts
    185

    Default

    Spelling was not standardized in the 19th century. Words got spelled phonetically, a lot.
    Andrew Grim
    Monte Mounted Rifles, Monte Boys
    Mess of Myself
    Occasional 7%er


    "Los Angeles at the close of the Rebellion was the most vindictive, uncompromising community in the United States" Horace Bell

  4. #4

    Default

    Hallo!

    In a semi-lirerate society, phonetic spelling abounds.

    And as shared, yes... there are "archaic" versions that go, or fade in an out, or are still used.

    We just had a discussion this past weekened over "-ed" versus '-t" past endings. Such as "I burnt the toast." versus "I burned the toast."

    Staid versus tayed is a bit more archaic than paid versus payed, or said versus sayed."

    Curt
    In gleichem Schritt und Tritt, Curt Schmidt

    Not a real Civil War reenactor, I only portray one on boards and fora.
    I do not portray a Civil War soldier, I merely interpret one.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •