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Thread: Domet flannel

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    93

    Default Domet flannel

    Well, me and my mom went to wal-mart today to look for some homespun cotton material to use for a civilian shirt. To my suprise, I see somthing that would do great for an issue shirt! they call it double napp flannel. It is kind of an off white, not soft, but not scratchy either. It kind of reminds me of buffing pad material. It would be too heavy for summer events, but it would be great for the late fall events. Have any of you saw this at your wal-mart? It is called double napp flannel. I dont know if it is wool or cotton, but I am leaning on the side of wool.
    Last edited by cjc; 02-05-2013 at 05:57 PM.
    Caleb Courtney
    30th Indiana Vol.

    "dont judge people by what they say...judge them by what they mean by it"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Southern Minnesota
    Posts
    908

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    Sir:
    If you have a JoAnn's Fabric near you, check their homespun cotton selection. A much better selection of some close to period patterns & colors. Might want to get the book on fabric history. WallyWorld used to have good selection but not so much lately. Now days, it is nearly all just the very over done, red or blue checkered stuff. In regards to your flannel question, I will defer to the better informed. Without seeing it, I would suspect that it is not very close to Domet. I know that my correct Domet shirt is miserable to wear unless I have on my undershirt. Wearing it in the midst of the summer heat will give you a much deeper appreciation for what the Boys of '61 went through. Something one should experience at least once in your reenacting career.
    Regards,
    Harley
    5th Minnesota Regt. Vol. Infy.,Co. C
    1st South Carolina Volunteers, Co. H
    New Ulm Battery
    Old West Regulators - Minnesota
    "I love my wife so much, I almost told her the other day!!" Old Norwegian
    http://fifthminnesotacompanyc.webs.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Tuskaloosa, Alabama
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    4,370

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    There will be a label on the end of each bolt at the cloth store that tells the fiber content.

    Its going to be the rare Walmart where anything 100 percent wool is found.
    Mrs. Lawson
    Weaver, Spinster, Strong Fast Dyes
    Knitted Goods and yarns available thlawson@bellsouth.net



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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Spring Hill, FL
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    Dommet flannel was more wool than cotton, and had no nap whatsoever. Anything other than dommet or true wool flannel is incorrect for any Federal issue shirt. That said, your material might make a fine civilian shirt. I've had some good luck in finding suitable homespun plaids and solid cottons at WalMart, but never any linen or wools worthy of replicating garments.
    Ross L. Lamoreaux
    Tampa Bay History Center
    www.tampabayhistorycenter.org
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    "The simplest things, done well, can carry a huge impact" - Karin Timour, 2012

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    New York
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    Dear Ross:

    Very interested in your post -- I'd always understood that cotton flannel isn't appropriate for a period correct shirt. But again my documentation for that is "I've always been told......

    Sincerely,
    Karin Timour
    Period Knitting -- Socks, Sleeping Hats, Balaclavas
    Atlantic Guard Soldiers' Aid Society
    Email: Ktimour@aol.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Spring Hill, FL
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    You are correct - cotton flannel is largely incorrect for the period. What WalMart calls "double nap" is actually a bit closer to "sanded twill" cotton than what we see sold as cotton flannel (like that in long sleeve modern flannel shirts). The "double nap" actually is a tighter weave and courser appearance than modern cotton flannel. It is still not a perfect choice to replicate garments with, but is closer fit to make citizen's shirts than to try to make Federal issue shirts with.
    Ross Lamoreaux
    Moderator and Sewer of Historical Clothing and Tall Tales

    "But our opportunity to learn and grow, to communicate the richness of the lives that have gone before us, that does not change. We do not outgrow it. It does not tatter and fall apart in our hands..." -Mrs. Terre Lawson, 2010

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    93

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    Thank yoy all for clearing this up for me.
    Caleb Courtney
    30th Indiana Vol.

    "dont judge people by what they say...judge them by what they mean by it"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    western NY
    Posts
    352

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    Ben tart sells dommet flannel.
    Phil Guenther
    progressively authentic
    Hard Workin Pards
    the Columbia Rifles
    The Living History Guild

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    37

    Default Domet flannel

    There must be differences in manufacturers of domet though because some is much scratchier than others. I had a shirt made recently out of a Charlie Childs kit and it was comparatively soft.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    358

    Default Thanks, Ross!

    Quote Originally Posted by FloridaHoosier View Post
    You are correct - cotton flannel is largely incorrect for the period. What WalMart calls "double nap" is actually a bit closer to "sanded twill" cotton than what we see sold as cotton flannel (like that in long sleeve modern flannel shirts). The "double nap" actually is a tighter weave and courser appearance than modern cotton flannel. It is still not a perfect choice to replicate garments with, but is closer fit to make citizen's shirts than to try to make Federal issue shirts with.
    Adding my thanks to Mr. Courtney's, I'd never heard of "double nap" and will see if I can find some next time I'm in a fabric store. Most of the Walmarts up this way have stopped carrying any fabric at all, and downsized much of their sewing equipment, etc. I suspect this may vary regionally. With the downsizing of Home Ec departments in junior highs and high schools, there just seem to be fewer people sewing these days. Of course, I grew up in Indiana, the state with the highest per capita 4-H participation, and many people took up sewing in 4-H........and if I keep going down this train of thought, I'm going to start reminiscing about how much I miss the 1880s.......


    In any case, your explanation was very clear, and dispelled my confusion about cotton flannel.

    Sincerely,
    Karin Timour
    Period Knitting -- Socks, Sleeping Hats, Balaclavas
    Atlantic Guard Soldiers' Aid Society
    Email: Ktimour@aol.com

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