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Thread: J.T. Martin Sack Coat

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    50

    Default J.T. Martin Sack Coat

    Looking at getting a new sack coat and want to know if this is authentic like it says in the description?

    J. T. Martin was the largest contractor for the Federal government with plants in New York, Philadelphia, Cincinnati and St. Louis. 85% of the J.T. Martin coat was machine stitched within the factory and the rest of the coat was hand stitched.

    This J.T. Martin 4 button sack coat is made similar to those ade during the Civil War. This coat features a 9-11 oz. Federal (navy) blue wool. The body of the sack coat is lined with 9-11 oz. tan wool and the sleeves are lined with muslin. It has a roll collar, an inside pocket, and a 4 button front of medium 3/4" Federal Eagle buttons.

    This coat is an authentic reproduction but without the hand stitching where the lining meets the collar, where the body and sleeve linings meet, where the bottom of the sleeve lining meets the wool, the buttonholes, and some areas around the inside pocket. Handstiching over the machine stitching of these areas is available as an option. Otherwise, the customer may handstich these areas. Call us for detailed instructions.

    Proudly MADE IN USA in the Great State of Idaho.

    Its from C&C Sutlery in Idaho.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New Baltimore, MI
    Posts
    413

    Default

    This should answer the question "This coat is an authentic reproduction but without the hand stitching where the lining meets the collar, where the body and sleeve linings meet, where the bottom of the sleeve lining meets the wool, the buttonholes, and some areas around the inside pocket. Handstiching over the machine stitching of these areas..."

    I have to say be careful with the made in the USA tag. I ordered trousers from this vendor many moons ago and there was a made in Packi sticker affixed firmly to the inside of the waistband. I think this is further supported in the fact that why would you handstich over the machine stitch if someone paid the extra? When you made the item why not just use handstiching instead of doing it twice? Maybe because someone else already made the coat? Just a thought.

    For just $45 more you can get a coat from Wambaugh and White or other places that has the features he says are missing (his shipping is $15 and WW includes shipping in their shown price).


    Please everyone do yourself a favor and compare the prices when looking for gear with shipping. So often the difference just isn't that much.
    Last edited by pvt_jb; 01-25-2013 at 07:26 PM. Reason: spielleng errers
    Respectfully,

    Jeremy Bevard
    Sally Port Mess
    Historic Fort Wayne Coalition
    Old Northwest Volunteers

    "If the men pursue the enemy as vigorously as they do the whores they will make very efficient soldiers."
    Charles B. Haydon, 2nd Michigan-May 6, 1861

    "The horse is dead, his bones beat to a fine powder, the powder used to make a fine biscuit, and the biscuit beaten back into a powder."
    John Wickett

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Jefferson City, TN
    Posts
    151

    Default

    I'll agree with Jeremy on this one. If authenticity is what you are going for, then save up the extra $50 and get one that you know is quality instead of having to wonder. Nothing worse that buying something twice!
    Sean Cooper
    Mossy Creek Mercantile
    Mossy Creek Mess
    SCAR

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill, FL
    Posts
    3,940

    Default

    If you're looking for "right", always avoid anyone who uses the statment "Authentic, but....." I concur with the esteemed gentlemen above, save your pennies and go for someone who truly uses correct material, pattern, and construction.
    Ross L. Lamoreaux
    Tampa Bay History Center
    www.tampabayhistorycenter.org
    On Facebook at: Tampa Bay History Center Living History Programs

    "The simplest things, done well, can carry a huge impact" - Karin Timour, 2012

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    185

    Default

    When I first got into the hobby I purchased from the vendor the poster mentioned including a sack coat. "Great example of why you should get guidance before purchasing blindly"

    My opinion, merchandise from the mentioned vendor, including sack coats, lacks in quality and authenticity "I'm being extremely kind here as my four letter description would probably be banned by the moderator!"

    Upper body wear and hats are what people focus in on the most, so get a good one even if it means waiting and saving back. I personally purchased my contract from Wambaugh & White and it was well worth the money.

    Joe Musgrove
    "I fight for Uncle Abe"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Eastern Shore of Maryland
    Posts
    88

    Default

    In my personal opinion, you can not go wrong with Wambaugh and White. Excellent customer service and product quality. He made me one and it is dead on as far as authenticity.

    Brent Conner

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    185

    Default

    Link offers good information on the sack coat.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=momqaQFJgX4

    Joe Musgrove
    "I fight for Uncle Abe"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Monessen PA
    Posts
    144

    Default

    Another option is the Wambaugh and White kits. You get the quality at a lower price, just by putting some of your own time & sweat in. And you also get a huge appreciation for those who make the garments, especially in a timely manner!

    Calum
    Calum Munro

    5th Virginia Infantry, Co H
    http://5thvacompanyh.webs.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Posts
    97

    Default

    To clarify, our reproduction contract sack coats do feature the top half of the sleeve linings set by machine with the lower half overcast by hand, as well as a machine sewn lower collar edge. The raw edge of the collar is turned up and machine sewn through the front facings & interfacings, lining, and of course through the exterior of the blouse itself just below the collar/neck line seam. These two details are claimed by some to be inaccurate however a number of surviving J.T. Martin blouses feature both of these sewing techniques executed by machine. The contract blouse that we offer is based directly on an original in a private collection that is marked only with black size dots and an F.H. Shaffer/Cincinnati inspector stamp. While it does share some construction and patterning similarities to extant Martin blouses, we (and the owner) feel that it is likely a product of the Cincinnati depot.
    Brian White
    Wambaugh, White, & Company
    www.wwandcompany.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    50

    Default

    Thank you for the input. I'm glad I asked before making a decision. So I am guessing the getting a J.T. Martin Sack coat would be the wisest investment for me to do? I want an authentic coat that can last for quite awhile and can cover eastern, western theater from 61-65. Thanks for the help I deeply appreciate it.

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