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Thread: Civilian Standards For the Blue Gray Alliance 'Town of Gettysburg' June 27-30

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    Default Civilian Standards For the Blue Gray Alliance 'Town of Gettysburg' June 27-30

    Friends,

    Civilian Standards for the Blue Gray Alliance Civilian Only "Town of Gettysburg" are up at Facebook Group 'Blue Gray Alliance Towns', and will be up on the event website shortly.

    These standards apply only to those in Town and do not apply to those living in 'mixed family/garrison camping'. We do hope those participants will read the guidelines and consider them in forming their own impressions for the event.

    There are, of course, a lot of folks who don't use Facebook. So, below are the various files that are shown in that Group.

    I'm absolutely Sure I've overlooked something. I'll be glad to answer questions.








    Mrs. Lawson
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    Knitted Goods and yarns available thlawson@bellsouth.net



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    Read ThisFirst—Or, How Do I Sign Up For The Civilian Town?



    DearFriends,

    For some ofyou, the concept of living in a ‘civilian town’ is not new—if you participatedin BGA events at Raymond, Shiloh, Wilson's Creek or Twin Rivers, you know how we operate. For others, this is a new concept. We hope you will enjoy the adventure as muchas others have.

    Historically,Gettysburg was a small farming town, full of farmers and tradesmen, men, women,and children going about their daily lives. With little warning, the War rolled right over them. We are going to do our best to portray thoseconditions, with the knowledge that canvas tents are not brick homes. You areencouraged to plan to go about your normal 1863 life—until it’s interrupted byWar.

    Please readthe articles linked below carefully—a lot of your questions will be answeredthere. Make sure you can comply with theguidelines. I’m very grateful to SallyRyan and Kimberlee Bruce for writing these guidelines and articles.

    THESE GUIDELINES APPLY ONLY TO THECIVILIAN ‘TOWN OF GETTYSBURG’. THEY DONOT APPLY TO THOSE CHOOSING TO CAMP IN THE MILITARY/FAMILY CAMPS.


    Then, ifyou’d like to be a part of this, apply to be a Citizen of the Town. You will do that by emailing us at BGAperiodtown@earthlink.net

    Give us yourname and contact information. Tell us whatyou plan to do at this event, any special demonstrations or talents you have. Attach a picture. If you are applying for your group, list allgroup members and send their picture too. Tell us the type of tentage you have,especially if you have a group. If youparticipated in one of our previous Towns, or in the Living History Village atPerryville, tell us that as well.

    You willhear back from us shortly, with an approval or suggestions for improvement.

    We also havea Facebook group: Blue Gray AllianceCivilian Towns. The administrators willbe glad to answer questions or make suggestions to help you.

    Our space is limited and we will not be ableto accommodate all applicants. The BGAdoes make provision for military/family camping and you will be able to campthere if the Town cannot accommodate you.





    LookingForward…..To Living in the Past

    Terre Lawson, Civilian Governor, Blue Gray Alliance

    Robert Orrand, Burgess, Town of Gettysburg
    Mrs. Lawson
    Weaver, Spinster, Strong Fast Dyes
    Knitted Goods and yarns available thlawson@bellsouth.net



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    SETTING THE STAGE—WHO LIVED IN THE TOWN OF GETTYSBURG?

    By Sally A. Ryan







    GETTYSBURG BEFORE THE BATTLE

    While many are familiar with and even experts of theBattle of Gettysburg, fewer people are as knowledgeable about the townitself. The story of Gettysburg and whatthe residents endured during the battle is now being told through the efforts ofhistorians, town guides and local establishments.



    By June, 1863, Gettysburg was a thriving town of 2400inhabitants. Most residents were white, but there was a well-establishedcommunity of African Americans. Gettysburg was the hub of a transportationnetwork of well-used roads and the railroad connecting farms, villages andsmall communities with larger towns and cities in all compass directions.



    Who were the people who lived here? Historians and thecensus records indicate that there were farmers and those involved in theagricultural industry; there were tanneries and shoe-makers, but NO shoefactories. (Put that myth to rest, please!) The carriage trade was an important one with people who not only builtthe carriages, but also those who provided the supplies, equipment andfurnishings for those carriages. Women were employed to sew draperies andupholstery for the carriages. There were scholars and faculty at twoinstitutions of higher education – Gettysburg College and the LutheranSeminary. There were school masters and school mistresses for the education ofthe local students as well as some who boarded in their academy schools. Many poorer folks worked in service to themore well off residents. There were shop owners, inn-keepers, newspaper editorsand reporters, seamstresses and haberdashers, boot-makers and cabinet makers, bakersand grocers, lawyers, doctors and clergy.



    The politics of this community reflected the country as awhole – as a border town, there were divided loyalties and divided families –north and south, Democratic, Republican, Whig. While Adams County was an integral part of the Underground Railroad, notall residents were ardent Abolitionists. Religion was an important part of lifein Gettysburg and Adams County with most residents attending Lutheran,Reformed, Presbyterian, Quaker and Roman Catholic churches. This reflected the predominant ethnic rootsof the population – German, English, Scots-Irish and Irish.



    In the 1860 census, there were 28,475 residents in AdamsCounty – 2400 lived in the Borough of Gettysburg. They represented all levelsof society in occupation, education, background and wealth. But in 1863, theybecame a people with the common goals of survival during a major battle and ofre-building during the long aftermath of the devastation.





    JUST A FEW RECOMMENDED RESOURCES-



    Bennett, Gerald R. Days of “Uncertainty and Dread” –The Ordeal Endured by the Citizens at Gettysburg



    Cleutz, David Rebels in the Front Yard – Liberty atGettysburg



    Coco, Gregory A. A Vast Sea of Misery – A Historyand Guide to the Union and Confederate Field Hospitals at Gettysburg, July1-November 20, 1863



    Conklin, E. F. Women at Gettysburg, 1863



    Creighton, Margaret S. The Colors of Courage –Gettysburg’s Forgotten History



    Drake, Kevin and Shower, Lisa A Quiet Town No More



    Sheldon, George When the Smoke Cleared at Gettysburg – TheTragic Aftermath of the Bloodiest Battle of the Civil War



    Slade, Jim and Alexander, John Firestormat Gettysburg – Civilian Voices, June – November 1863












  4. #4
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    BLUE GRAY ALLIANCE150TH GETTYSBURG JUNE 27-30, 2013

    CAMPING GUIDELINES FORTHE CIVILIAN ONLY “TOWN OF GETTYSBURG”

    A. The Townwill open for set up on Wednesday morning, June 26. The Town will close to ALL vehicle trafficat 6:00 pm Thursday June 27. There is amandatory Town Meeting at 7:00 pm Thursday June 27. If you cannot arrive by the posted time,please camp in the mixed camp/ garrison areas, which will remain open later. No vehicles will be allowed in Town under anycircumstance until after the battle and/or final ceremony on Sunday. Please donot try and bring your car into Town before then.

    B. Street layouts will be in place when youarrive. Layouts will simulate streets with tent fronts facing tent fronts. Whena second street is needed, tents will be back-to-back to the first street withan ‘alley’ in between. Groups with several tents who wish to camp together areencouraged to arrive together. Check infor space assignment will be at the marked ‘Town Hall’ area.

    C. The “street” will be wide enough to accommodatevehicle unloading. Please unload yourcar/truck within 20 minutes and go to reenactor parking. Then come set up yourtent.

    D. There will be a representation of the TownSquare. This will be the center of activity for the Town. A bell will bemounted for alarms or to gather the Citizens at the Square. The Square willalso be the focal point for any engagement with Military units. This may be a flyat some events, at others it may be a post with the bell attached.

    E. Civilian Weapons will be allowed on acase-by-case basis, inspected and approved by the Mayor/Burgess, Robert Orrand.Occupying military may confiscate weapons when seen, so there will not be a lotof chances to fire them. Please applyfor firearms approval before the event.

    F. The Townwill be a Civilian-Only Town. All reenactors must be in period Civilian clotheswhen out of their tents throughout the weekend. This includes when spectatorshave left. Please, no sweatsuits, jeans, etc. outside of the tents. Militaryuniforms will be on occupying forces, not Citizens.

    G. The Town willbe part of Military scenarios during the reenactment. As such, there may bemilitary incursions into the camping area. Military commanders will be apprisedof tents off-limits to searches before the reenactment. Additionally, there will be times whencitizens cannot leave the Town area due to fighting all around it.

    H. The Townwill be under Confederate or Federal control at varying times of thereenactment. Anyone in Military uniform of the non-occupying force will besubject to arrest by the occupying Provost. The Town Burgess may be givenarrest power by the Provost as well.

    I. All items used outside your tent must be ofperiod correct materials and manufacture. All modern conveniences need to be out of sight at all times. While wedo not pretend to be a hardcore event, many in the Town will wish to see asmuch period correctness as possible. Please be considerate of your neighbors.At no time will small generators or “noise” producers be allowed. Silence allcell phones.

    J. The Townwill not have individual fires. Shared fire areas will be placed at intervalson the street. Fire areas will be marked by little white flags. You will need to dig a pit, and refill itwhen the event is over. Please only have fires in those marked areas. That means4 or 6 families will need to share. Each family should provide one ‘firebucket’, to be filled with water or sand, and placed by the community pit.

    K. We encourage participation from Civilianscamping in family/garrison areas. We do require visiting participants to adhereto our dress guidelines, which are listed separately.


    Robert Orrand, Burgess, Town of Gettysburg

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    Clothing Guidelines for Children

    Children’s clothing needs to be in the same socialeconomical class as their parents.

    Prints (documented to the period) and plaids in cotton, woolor linen are appropriate for children of all ages. White outfits may be appropriate for verysmall babies.

    All children should be wearing drawers of same kind.

    We are aware that period reproduction shoes for children arenot affordable for many families. Pleasedo your best to have shoes that present a period appearance, including paddockboots or elastic gusseted Jodhpur boots.

    Girls and smallchildren

    Dresses with open necklines (bateau) are very common inwarmer weather. High necklines (jewel)may be worn, as well as necklines between the two extremes. Dresses should beback fastening. Zouave jackets, whiteblouse with dark skirts maybe worn by upper class girls and teenagers.

    Dresses for teenage girls may follow the guidelines of adultwomen except in regards to hemlines.

    1. 13-14 years old hemmed at mid-calf
    2. 14-15 years old hemmed to lower calf to mid shin
    3. 15-18 years old hemmed within a hand span of the ankle bone
    4. 17- 20 or married women hemmed at adult women’s length.



    Young women less than 16 years old should be wearing backfastening bodices with appropriate supportive undergarments for their figure.

    Girls should wear petticoats and chemises under theirdresses. Corded petticoats or smallhoops are acceptable for all girls who are walking.

    Slat bonnets, corded bonnets, fashion bonnets, quiltedbonnets or hats are appropriate for girls and small children.

    Pinafores or smocks in period correct fabric maybe worn,this allows the children to play and get dirty.

    Boys

    Trousers with a shirt, coat and hat or cap are appropriatefor boys of all socio economical status.

    Boys that have not been toilet trained are to be dressed infrocks or smocks and petticoats. These samefrocks and smocks may be worn over trousers for toilet trained boys.

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    Male ClothingGuidelines (Working Class)

    NO MILITARY UNIFORMSCAN BE WORN BY CIVILIAN MALES LIVING IN THE “TOWN OF GETTYSBURG”

    All clothing must be made according to period constructiontechniques and patterns. All Buttonholesneed to be hand done.

    1. Asuit of clothes that can include a coat, vest/waistcoat, over shirt andtrousers is required. The cloth shouldbe of period materials appropriate to the garment type and socio economic levelof the wearer. Garments can be made ofwool, cotton, linen or period blends such as jean cloth and linsey. Frock, Paletot, Sack and Roundabout coatsare all acceptable patterns. Suitableweaves for coats, vests and trousers include broadcloth, cassimere, satinetteand kersey. Over shirts are commonlymade with flannel or drill.

    2. Overallsof period construction are acceptable. Shirts must be worn.

    3. Buttonsshould be made with period materials: shell, glass, china or bone buttons onshirts; bone or tin buttons on pants; 1851 patent hard rubber buttons, cloth or“coin” buttons on coats.

    4. Shirtsshould be made of cotton, wool, or appropriate blends. Shirts made of woven checks and stripes,appropriate cotton prints, or solid colors.

    5. Suspendersmust be of correct construction, no “Y” backs.

    6. Neckwearof correct pattern and materials appropriate to the socio economic status ofthe wearer are encouraged. If tied,please ensure they are tied correctly. Pre-tied Cravats or “Cheater” ties did exist and documented styles areacceptable.

    7. Shoes,bootees or boots with all leather soles and made of leather and correctmaterials are required.

    8. Underclothingthat is period appropriate and made of correct material is encouraged. No visible modern underwear.

    9. Hatsof straw or felt that are properly blocked or caps are required and should beworn outdoors.

    10. Hairand facial hair must be worn in a period correct style.

    11. Accessoriessuch as gloves, canes, pocket watches, satchels and wallets should be ofdocumented styles and construction. Modern items such as wrist watches are not to be worn or visible duringthe event.



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    Female Guidelines ForWorking Class

    All clothing must be made according to period constructiontechniques and patterns. At a minimum,all Buttonholes need to be hand done.

    1. Female Civilians are required to wear a period correct dress made of cotton, wool or linen. Please keep in mind age appropriate styles, no blouse/skirt/jacket combinations unless you are a child or teenager. White collars and cuffs or neckerchiefs need to be worn.
    2. Sheer dresses are also acceptable and encouraged for this event. Sacque and Petticoat combinations may be worn if appropriate to the status portrayed. Wrappers are encouraged for early morning and late evening wear, but should not be used in place of a dress unless the wearer is pregnant.
    3. Underclothing correct to the period including a corset or stays required. This includes chemise, under petticoats, work hoop or corded petticoat, and depending on age, drawers. Stockings may be wool or cotton. Keep in mind that drawers were not worn by some women depending on age, and social standing.
    4. Aprons of a period correct fabric (cotton, wool, or linen) and period construction are highly encouraged. An apron is a key element in a working impression.
    5. Shoes or boots of a period style are required.
    6. Head covers such as slat bonnets, corded bonnets, or quilted bonnets are encouraged. Be sure to pick a style that is appropriate to your age and social economic status.
    7. Hair must be worn in a period correct style. Generally it is to be parted in the center, no bangs, and confined at or below the nape of the neck. Hairnets may be worn if made of correct materials and are appropriate to your first person portrayal.
    8. Eyewear must be correct to the time period or to an earlier period. Contact lenses are permitted. No modern eye wear is allowed.
    9. Outerwear must be made with correct construction and patterns to the time period. Outerwear includes but is not limited to jackets, shawls, mantels, and capes.
    10. Accessories such as jewelry should be limited and simplistic in style appropriate to economic status of your persona.



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    Male ClothingGuidelines (Upper class)



    NO MILITARY UNIFORMSARE BE WORN BY CIVILIAN MALES LIVING WITHIN THE TOWN


    All clothing must be made with period correct materials andaccording to period construction techniques and patterns. At a minimum, all Buttonholes need to be handdone.

    1. ASuit of clothes that include a sack coat or frock coat, a vest/waistcoat andtrouser are required. All garments areexpected to be of materials appropriate to the garment type and socio economiclevel of the wearer. Cloth can be wool,linen, silk or period blends such as linsey. Frock, Paletot, Tail and Sack coats are all acceptable patterns. Suitable cloth weaves for garments includebroadcloth, cassimere, satinette and kersey.

    2. Buttonsshould be made with period materials: shell, glass, china or bone buttons onshirts; bone or tin buttons on pants; 1851 patent hard rubber buttons, cloth or“coin” buttons on coats.

    3. Shirtsshould be made of linen, cotton, wool, or appropriate blends. Most often, well to do and aspiring men wouldwear white shirts, but documented shirts made of patterned or print materialare acceptable.

    4. Suspendersmust be of correct construction, no “Y” backs.

    5. Neckwearof correct pattern and materials appropriate to the socio economic status ofthe wearer are encouraged. If tied,please ensure they are tied correctly. Pre-tied Cravats or “Cheater” ties did exist and documented styles areacceptable.

    6. Shoes,bootees or boots with all leather soles and made of leather and correctmaterials are required.

    7. Hatsof felt that are properly blocked or of straw are required and should be wornoutdoors.

    8. Underclothingthat is period appropriate and made of correct material is encouraged. No visible modern underwear.

    9. Hairand facial hair must be worn in a period correct style.

    10. Accessoriessuch as gloves, canes, pocket watches, satchels and wallets should be ofdocumented styles and construction. Modern items such as wrist watches are not to be worn or visible duringthe event.

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    Female Guidelines(Upper class)

    All clothing must be made according to period constructiontechniques and patterns. At a minimum,all Buttonholes need to be hand done.

    1. Female Civilians are required to wear a period correct dress made of cotton, wool, linen or silk. Please keep in mind age appropriate styles, no blouse/skirt/jacket combinations unless you are a child or teenager. White collars and cuffs need to be worn with most dresses. The exception to this is sheer dresses, which are encouraged for this event.
    2. Underclothing correct to the period including a corset or stays required. This includes chemise, under petticoats, work hoop or corded petticoat, and, depending on age, drawers. Stockings may be wool or cotton. Keep in mind that drawers were not worn by some women depending on age, and social standing.
    3. Aprons of a period correct fabric (cotton, wool, linen or silk) and period construction are permitted. An apron may not be needed by this socio-economic class of women but a fancy silk apron may be worn to service lunch or tea.
    4. Shoes or boots of a period style are required.
    5. Head covers such as fashion bonnets, slat bonnets, corded bonnets, or quilted bonnets are encouraged. Be sure to pick a style that is appropriate to your age and socio- economic status.
    6. Hair must be worn in a period correct style. Generally it is to be parted in the center, no bangs, and confined at or below the nape of the neck. Hairnets may be worn if made of correct materials and are appropriate to your first person portrayal.
    7. Eyewear must be correct to the time period or to an earlier period. Contact lenses are permitted. No modern eye wear is allowed.
    8. Outerwear must be made with correct construction and patterns to the time period. Outerwear includes but is not limited to jackets, shawls, mantels, sontags, sacques, and capes.
    9. Accessories such as gloves, parasols and jewelry must be period in style and construction. Jewelry can be limited and simplistic, or elaborate and fancy in style, whichever is appropriate to the economic status of your persona. Gloves typically would be of black or brown leather.



  10. #10
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    Folks, I apologize for the word spacing difficulties in these documents--they were straight when I sent them up for the website.

    Obviously my learning curve is Very Steep when it comes to Windows 8, and the very latest version of Microsoft Word.

    After the last 24 hours, I am longing for the sharp smell of mimeograph ink, two reams of paper, and a whole bunch of stamps.
    Mrs. Lawson
    Weaver, Spinster, Strong Fast Dyes
    Knitted Goods and yarns available thlawson@bellsouth.net



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