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Thread: Artillery

  1. #11
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    Mr Zulu's product is definitely an absolutely beautiful piece of artwork performed in wood.

    My book is the only book that documents *all* the steps, techniques, and calculations in making a U.S. Army Civil War period standard field service artillery wheel, and the only book written that provides *every* step and technique in making *any* wooden hub wheel, including information and techniques begged from active and retired wheelwrights. But to provide any of those methods in this thread, could and probably would be interpreted as some as criticism of his very nice art piece.

    If Mr Zulu would like to PM me, I could provide him with information to possibly help him fine tune his very nice artwork. I could also provide information for him on acquiring either my book on building functional wheels, or there is also a series of books instructing the construction of almost authentic looking non-functioning art-type display cannon wheels. The same could be said perhaps for clothing. You could answer questions by someone making a French-cut shirt if asked, or you could provide a full set of instructions for step-by-step making of a shirt to someone. But any suggestions for improving someone else's posted shirt would entail saying how that shirt should or should not be constructed, thus sounding like criticism of the posted shirt.
    Last edited by David Einhorn; 12-29-2012 at 04:41 AM.
    David Einhorn, Author of the book titled, "Civil War Blacksmithing" available from Amazon.com http://www.amazon.com/Civil-War-Blac...+blacksmithing

  2. #12

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    We've gotten threads locked up quicker than Otis Campbell on a Friday night bender! The man posted his pictures so that we could both admire and critique. Right now this thread sounds like the cowboys assessment of the grand Canyon: "Heck of a place to lose a cow."
    <Breathing deeply and continuing in a scholarly voice> these cannons are so pretty! The only guns I've ever assembled were plastic kits and wargame figs. I have to admit that I'm more fond of uniforms than guns or horses, so I tend to paint them as quickly and simply as I can. Have you ever thought of recreating some of the wooden guns in history that actually fire?
    Rob Weaver
    Pine River Boys, Co I, 7th Wisconsin
    "We're... Christians, what read the Bible and foller what it says about lovin' your enemies and carin' for them what despitefully use you -- that is, after you've downed 'em good and hard."
    -Si Klegg and His Pard Shorty

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Weaver View Post
    .....Have you ever thought of recreating some of the wooden guns in history that actually fire?
    It is not possible to construct cannon barrels out of wood that can actually fire.

    I suggest reading a free copy of the book titled, "The Artillerist's Manual" by the author
    John Gibbon http://books.google.com/books/about/...d=8FEkwTZd9FMC
    David Einhorn, Author of the book titled, "Civil War Blacksmithing" available from Amazon.com http://www.amazon.com/Civil-War-Blac...+blacksmithing

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Einhorn View Post
    It is not possible to construct cannon barrels out of wood that can actually fire.
    Actually...

    From the Boshin War, 1867-68 in Japan.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sendai1868Cannons.JPG

    They couldn't fire many shots before bursting, and I wouldn't want to be around one being fired today, but they're one example of wooden cannons, bound with rope.

    Others had wooden barrels bound with iron, so they might not count as truly wood, like for example:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Vi...March_1862.jpg

    Google cherry cannon bulgaria, or just "wooden cannon" for a few examples over the years when people in desperate circumstances got off a shot or two, when they had little or no iron. There was supposedly one used in Kentucky by Squire Boone back in the 18th century, but I don't know any examples from the 1860s and in the U.S., other than of course non-firing Quaker guns.

    Personally, from an artistic standpoint, I much prefer the detailed reconstruction of metal cannons done in wood like Zulu is doing, rather than a replica of cruder makeshift ones that wouldn't be safe to use, but I think the ones above are the kinds of things that Rob Weaver's talking about.

    Hank Trent
    hanktrent@gmail.com

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Einhorn View Post
    It is not possible to construct cannon barrels out of wood that can actually fire.

    Ummm. You might want to check the accounts of action around Athens, Missouri on that one.


    In the meantime, y'all settle down, show that YourMama raised you with manners, and state your cases in a gentlemanly discussion. This is not the place for measuring contests.

    And Book Selling belongs on Sutler Row.
    Mrs. Lawson
    Weaver, Spinster, Strong Fast Dyes
    Knitted Goods and yarns available thlawson@bellsouth.net



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  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinster View Post
    Ummm. You might want to check the accounts of action around Athens, Missouri on that one.
    Bingo! There's a U.S. Civil War example. I swear, there's always at least one of everything.

    http://books.google.com/books?id=alf...69&output=html

    Along with his two iron cannon, Kneisley had brought an improvised gun made from a hollowed out log reinforced with steel bands. It was not reinforced enough, however. For the gun exploded the first time it was fired, wounding some of its crew."
    Hank Trent
    hanktrent@gmail.com

  7. #17
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    Giggle. Hank can always find stuff that my head remembers--imperfectly.

    I could have sworn those boys got off three shots. Now I'll have to figure out which war that did happen in.
    Mrs. Lawson
    Weaver, Spinster, Strong Fast Dyes
    Knitted Goods and yarns available thlawson@bellsouth.net



    Moderator, When I remember. We got Rules here!

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  8. #18
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    Hi Mrs. Lwason, The cannon that you refered to as being fired three times - could that have been the tree trunk barrel constructed by Squire Boonne used in the defense of Boonesborough Ky. during the seige of Boonesborough in 1778, which split after two shots ? Hard to understand if it split "on" the second shot or if two shots were fired "then" split on what would then have been the third shot. (Wikipedia, wooden cannons, Siege of Boonesborough)
    Nightstalker

  9. #19
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    Thank you, that's likely what I am remembering, as I do multiple time periods, portraying the lower class, primarily west of the Appalachians. I've been slowly reading the Draper Manuscripts as money, time, and the ability to borrow these semi-obscure documents about the 18th century settlers is available.

    We participated in the Seige of Boonesboro event several years ago. I've not gotten to do as much as the 150ths heated up.
    Mrs. Lawson
    Weaver, Spinster, Strong Fast Dyes
    Knitted Goods and yarns available thlawson@bellsouth.net



    Moderator, When I remember. We got Rules here!

    Did your sales post disappear? Try again. But read the rules first.
    Here they are: http://www.cwreenactors.com/forum/sh...Classified-Ads



  10. #20

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    There was also a Federal wooden mortar at Vicksburg. As I recall, it didn't perfom well, either.
    Rob Weaver
    Pine River Boys, Co I, 7th Wisconsin
    "We're... Christians, what read the Bible and foller what it says about lovin' your enemies and carin' for them what despitefully use you -- that is, after you've downed 'em good and hard."
    -Si Klegg and His Pard Shorty

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