Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Looking for our Missing battle Flag from 1862-1865 for the 5th Regt. NCST

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    brad becker Guest

    Default Looking for our Missing battle Flag from 1862-1865 for the 5th Regt. NCST

    We are starting a new Civil war re-enactment group Company D 5th Regt. NCST. We were Members with the 7th NCST.
    We want to see a picture of the flag used from 1862-1865 would have been surrendered at appomatix Court house VA.
    The only copy we can find of the 5th Regt. Flag was the first flag made of silk captured during the battle of williamsburg in 1862 now at the history museum in Raleigh NC. We need to look deep into small Museums and private collections. Looking for our final battle flag which would have our battle honors sewn onto it. So we can produce a hand sewn copy. Hopefully its out there some where and has not been destroyed. We need every ones help to find this flag.

    bbbecker@bizec.rr.com
    Private 5th NCST

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    358

    Default

    Dear Mr. Becker:

    1. 545 captured Confederate flags were given to the US Army War Department after the war. All were stenciled with a number, and linen tags with the capture history of each was attached, for use in documentation when awarding Medals of Honor. Records were kept of each flag, and those records are now in the National Archives Registry of Captured Flags.

    2. In 1909 many of these flags were given back to their respective states, if it was possible to determine which state should receive it. Not all regimental flags had the words "X regiment of X state" written or sewn on them.

    3. 252 unidentified flags were given to the Museum of the Confederacy, and are held in their archives.

    4. A large number (not sure how many) of the Confederate flags captured by New York regiments were displayed, rotting, for years and years in the lobby of our capital. They were all rolled around their poles. It was quite the tourist attraction for decades. Some of those have now been returned to their respective states, but others are now being held in the New York Museum of Military History in Saratoga, NY. They have a large flag restoration project underway, but the first priority are flags of New York regiments.

    5. If you don't have a description (however cursory) of what the flag looked like, that's the first task. Do you know who gave the flag to the regiment? Or where they were when they got the new flag? Often there will be newspaper articles in local papers when something like that happens, especially if local ladies sewed the new flag, or a local businessman donated it. If you can determine who gave the flag, getting in touch with that family might bring you a written description from a letter in family archives, as people were very, very proud of their local regimental flags.

    6. Once you've got a written description of the flag, I'd contact the National Archives to see if it's indexed. Might not be, because it was surrendered at Appomattox, not captured in a battle action that might result in a medal for the guy who captured it.

    7. Check with the Museum of the Confederacy and see if your description matches any of their "unidentified" flags. They also have an extensive flag restoration project underway, and might welcome any information you can give them about what the flag used to look like if it's among their "unidentified" ones -- many of which are quite deteriorated.

    8. I'd also put in a call/letter to the NYS Museum of Military History and see if they have any unidentified Confederate flags that match your description. They have a limited listing on their database, but I think that's primarily the flags that have already been restored, and as a NC flag, it's behind all the NYS flags for restoration. If it turns out that they have your flag, however, I think you can get them to move it higher on the restoration schedule if you can raise the funding for it. But you'd need to contact them to see if that's even possible.

    9. If, after all that, you've still got zip, I'd start contacting other Northern state capitals and military museums. I think a lot of the flags surrendered at Appomattox were parcelled out to various Northern states as "trophies of war." Some of these capitals may still be holding them, others may have records telling you where they sent any that they repatriated.

    10. Since you've scoped out the NC State Museum, am assuming you've already also contacted the local historical society in the county/town where your regiment was recruited? Sometimes the most obvious place to look first.

    11. A final word of advice about your search. You're going to be needing to reach out to curators and museum staff, often in very small state, local and county archives. These are the types of institutions which are the first to have staff cuts in hard times. Many of them don't have computerized records, and a surprising number of them don't have access to email or don't have time to montior email requests any more frequently than once a week or once a month.

    If you want a response, I would strongly recommend that you call ahead, find out the name of the person who would be responsible for searching their holdings for you. I can double guarantee that a letter addressed "State Museum..." without the name of the person (or with the incorrect name) is going to be thrown out or put to one side, probably forever. Once you have the right person, the letter you write should explain the steps you've already taken. It will be best if that letter is short, succinct and POLITE. Did I mention POLITE? If you're from North Carolina, likely you got some invaluable home training which will give you a leg up in how to be polite. Two-three paragraphs, max. If you can do it in four or five sentences, even better. Include all the different ways to get back in touch with you (phone, cell, email, snail mail) as you don't know what would be most convenient for them. A good idea might be a stamped, self-addressed envelope with several stamps on it, in case they have documentation to send you.

    Keep in mind that the people you are contacting are the professionals who hold the keys to all the goodies we want to see and visit, now and in the future. They are a very small group of people, and often know each other. Group gets smaller with each new round of budget cuts. Stay on their good side, because they can open doors for you if they like you and think you are a) not crazy; b) not lazy; c) passionate about history. If you call someone and they say that they don't have your flag, thank them kindly for the time, and ask them if they have suggestions for where else you could look. If they do, ask if you can use their name as the person who suggested that you call the new place.

    If you want to score serious points with curators/musum professionals, write them a personal "thank you" note for helping you in your quest -- even if all they did was say "No, it's no here, why don't you try the Bug Tussel Historical Society, they might have it."

    If you want to score MEGA, Serious points that will keep you on their list of people they want to help in the future, write a letter to their boss, with a cc to them, telling that official how helpful this person (with their name) at this institution, was in your quest to research your heritage. Federal institution? I think they fall under the Department of the Interior, so that would be the Secretary of the Interior, with a copy to your Federal Senator and Federal Representative (Someone who knows more about this correct me if I've mixed up my Federal Departments). State institution? Letter to the Governor, cc to your local state senator and your local state representatiive. County institution? County Commissioner, local representative. City? Mayor and city councilperson/city assemblyperson.

    Your letter might mean the difference in their institution getting funds cut or losing a position or two, and being able to keep the staff and budget they have. No small feat in these hard times.

    I know it looks like a lot of work, but if you sit down and make yourself a template, you can just change a few names and print out a letter. Snail mail postage for a first class letter (and up to three additional sheets of paper) is currently 45 cents.

    Just remember, these are the people who know where the real good stuff is. Stay on their good side, and they can open amazing doors for you.

    Hope that's helpful,

    Karin Timour
    Period Knitting -- Socks, Sleeping Hats, Balaclavas
    Atlantic Guard Soldiers' Aid Society
    Email: Ktimour@aol.com
    Last edited by KarinTimour; 12-12-2012 at 05:29 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Marion, NC
    Posts
    142

    Default

    I referred to the book The Flags of Civil War North Carolina by Glenn Dedmondt. It shows the 50% remnant of the 5thNC flag that was issued to the regiment in April 63. This battle flag was captured in March 65. There are no battle honors on the flag. The remnant is housed in the MOC. The book gives exact dimensions.

    Gregg Hensley
    22 NCT, Co. K
    Carolina Legion
    Last edited by Gregg Hensley; 12-12-2012 at 09:15 PM. Reason: clumsy fingers

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    358

    Default Proof that Books Aren't Dead Yet

    Mr. Hensley,

    You've proved that not everything can be found through Google. There's a value in having a few good books about the house.

    Sincere thanks,
    Karin Timour
    Period Knitting -- Socks, Sleeping Hats, Balaclavas
    Atlantic Guard Soldiers' Aid Society
    Email: Ktimour@aol.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Marion, NC
    Posts
    142

    Default

    When I have a question, I always look in my modest library FIRST! To quote Thomas Jefferson, "I could not live in a world without books." I guess I'm just "old school" about reading. Thanks for the kind words. Should Mr. Becker wish to have the dimensions/materials, I'll be happy to post them!

    Gregg Hensley
    22 NCT, Co. K
    Carolina Legion

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Marion, NC
    Posts
    142

    Default

    Might as well post the dimensions anyway! This flag was captured at Ft. Stedman by the 57th Massachusetts. This Richmond Depot 3rd issue flag is 47" (hoist) x 36" (fly, remaining). The red field is crossed with 5" wide blue bars edged with 1/2" white cotton fimbriation. Five 3.5" diameter stars remain of the original 13. Three sides were edged with 2" wide white bunting. A 1.75" white canvas hoist is pierced with three whipped eyelets. Also of note is that the only addition to the flag is the number 5 over the center star and NC underneath.

    Gregg Hensley
    22 NCT, Co. K
    Carolina Legion

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •