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Thread: National Events

  1. #11
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    Central Va
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    250

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    Just an observation... but over the decades Ive noticed that a "National Event" title tag appeared moreso to be a marketing ploy. The hopes that it will generate more spectator as well as participant interest. Even though the hobby is rapidly evolving...... There are still lots of spectators and folks in the hobby that chose and/or measure an event by the projected or speculated mass of numbers attending, regardless of quality or lack thereof.... and/or how much potential for powder burning it may offer....

    Granted many have abandoned that previous standard and have moved on to better quality events. But plenty still out there with that old mindset. Many of those still follow that old trail because thats the only type of events they may generally have ever gone too, and little to no exposure to anything else to gauge upon. If ones unit only ever go's to cheezy carnival events, what else would the guys in the ranks understand, know or learn about otherwise. Things are changing... but with anything naturally tends to be a slow transition for some... Plenty still in that old camp that the carnival events will be slow to change or die...

    Just an observation.....
    Lieut Frederick Sineth
    14th Virginia Infantry Regt Co.I
    - 106th Penna Vol Co.F

    - Pegrams Va Artillery
    - 150th Sailors Creek

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jubilo View Post
    Dear Sir,
    Vicksburg was poorly supported by Federals other than the medical team and perhaps some artillery. This was undoubtably due inpart to the support for Perryville. Still, Confederates galvinized and of the three Vicksburg scenarios, one was first-rate, one lackluster and the final assault on the Texas Lunette, was outstanding.
    From a private's point of view numbers do count. It's incredible to stand in line of battle and witness troops as far as can be seen. Most battles in other reenacting periods look ridiculous due to the paucity of soldiers involved.
    No event is totally satisfying for all in the hobby and hobbyists will attend the events they like.
    all for the old flag,
    David Corbett
    Not to start a row. But....for you numbers count. Others, obviously by your post, don't care about numbers, ergo, the federals had some where else to go that more suited what they wanted out of their hobby. In plane words, folks have stopped buying a product they don't like. And, I think the GAC/BGA Gettysburg numbers will bear that out. We'll see who buys which product. And, we'll see what's more important, where you spend your money on your hobby; or, "numbers" at an event. And, I think one might conclude, since the GAC has done the same old same old for years on end, there is obviously a demand for a different product. "Better," should be reserved until mid July, 2013 when all of the G-150's are over.

    And, on a side note, from what I'm seeing one or both of the G-150th's could be termed "international" if one were wanting to split hairs.

    I picked one on the living histories, it's what I want out of my hobby. And, I'm quite certain, the re-'nactor police aren't going to put me in re-'nacter jail because of what I've chosen. Not to increase "numbers," at an event.

    In the lyrics of Bob Dylan, "times they are a changin'."
    Last edited by lincolnsguard; 11-21-2012 at 04:08 PM. Reason: can't spell worth beans at times...
    Eli Heagy
    187th PV

    The 137th NY performed way, way better than the 20th Maine at Gettysburg. They just didn't have a self promoting blow hard of a Col. leading them. Maybe you should look up the history of the 83rd Pennsylvania too, they make the 20th Maine look like the rookies they were.
    There are some very good books out there about the fighting on Culps and Lower Culps Hill. Vincent's Brigade had nothing on those boys at the other end of the line.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    1,313

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    Good comparison-

    MMM vs GAC Antietam

    In the end, final totals, more reenactors chose MMM.

    The times are changing.....FINALLY!

    Pards,
    S. Chris Anders
    Southern Division
    www.southerndivision.org
    http://www.civilwarhenrico.com/

    There is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things. - Niccoló Machiavelli, The Prince. 1537.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Shenandoah Valley
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    410

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    Anything that uses a "marketing ploy" should be avoided at all costs.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Wouldn't you like to know.
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    It's incredible to stand in line of battle and witness troops as far as can be seen.
    Yes it is. On special occassions. But if a midway carnival holds sway, it can ruin a mega-event for those with more refined æsthetic tastes.

    Most battles in other reenacting periods look ridiculous due to the paucity of soldiers involved.
    Ridiculous is in the eye of the beholder. Much depends on the period and the type of event itself. I've attended CW Living Histories, just a detail of men manning a remote pickett post, and had a far better time than at 90% of some the so-called "National" mega-events. There are those who stand in utter bewilderment at why on earth I and the handful of gents I participate with in these micro-events would want to do something so minimalist. I counter with, why do care what I do?

    No event is totally satisfying for all in the hobby and hobbyists will attend the events they like.
    Right. To each his own. Ultimately, the hobby is what YOU make of it, not what someone else dictates. And there are a multitude of sub-hobbies within the over-arching hobby. When one realizes and accepts this the question becomes: Why is this conversation even taking place?

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Chicago IL
    Posts
    424

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    Dear Sir,
    "Numbers," aren't all inclusive but are impressive. Most Civil War battles were enormous in terms of numbers engaged and terrrain. Consider "epic." A major battle cannot be reenacted , i.e., look like a massive military engagement with few troops. We are not discussing "living histories." Ander's events as have produced enough particpants to appear "historic."
    all for the old flag,
    David Corbett

  7. #17
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    Sep 2007
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    'cept there's no horses....anywhere.
    Eli Heagy
    187th PV

    The 137th NY performed way, way better than the 20th Maine at Gettysburg. They just didn't have a self promoting blow hard of a Col. leading them. Maybe you should look up the history of the 83rd Pennsylvania too, they make the 20th Maine look like the rookies they were.
    There are some very good books out there about the fighting on Culps and Lower Culps Hill. Vincent's Brigade had nothing on those boys at the other end of the line.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jubilo View Post
    Ander's events as have produced enough particpants to appear "historic."
    Aren't they still, like most events, about a 1:10 ratio at least? In other words, the historic event being recreated is on a small piece of ground, with a fraction of the real soldiers, so one still needs to imagine a lot.

    The further disadvantage is that the more reenactors who come, the lower the standards need to be outside of the battle, so one winds up spending most of the weekend in a fixed camp in unrealistic proximity to the enemy. I didn't get much of a "time travel" sensation at the Anders events I've attended for that reason, and the battles still required imagining many more people than portrayed, same as at smaller events, but with the disadvantage that I also had to imagine everything that happened before and after--the long march to get there, the wounded left on the field, the desperate retreat, etc.

    That's not necessarily a negative for Anders' events, because they fill a niche. But it's not the only niche.

    If one's goal in the hobby is to be part of a lot of people portraying soldiers during a battle, well, then, yes, you need a lot of soldiers. If the purpose is to get a time travel experience for as long as possible, the number of participants doesn't directly correlate to that.

    Hank Trent
    hanktrent@gmail.com

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Galion, Ohio
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    1,105

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    Well Hank, at least at Anders events the two camps are seperated. Gotta say seein' a Federal in camp is pretty rare. However, it is mostly a mainstream camp for better or worse.

    Harry
    Member 5th Texas Co. A/1st NC Artillery. Disabled Viet Nam veteran, 1970. I was so much older then, I'm younger than that now!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4UcaLHaabY

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Artyman View Post
    Well Hank, at least at Anders events the two camps are seperated.
    Attending At High Tide with the CS medical department, we were camped with only a dirt roadway separating us from the Federals, and could see and hear everything they did. At Maryland My Maryland, we did camp separately and I rarely saw a Federal. So in my experience, that was 50-50, not a guarantee. In both cases, though one could pretend the other side wasn't there, it seemed strange to simply sit in place for a day, when we should have been retreating.

    Again, that's just part of the necessary, practical situation when dealing with large numbers of reenactors on limited land, not the fault of Chris Anders or anyone, and I agree that Anders' events try to give a more accurate experience than some other events. But based on the few I've attended, there are still some limitations that make them not feel as much like the past, simply due to their size, which can be overcome better by smaller events, though smaller events have limitations in other ways.

    In other words, it's always a trade-off, based on whatever makes the hobby worthwhile for any particular reenactor.

    Hank Trent
    hanktrent@gmail.com

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