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Thread: Hardtack

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Clermont County Ohio
    Posts
    374

    Default

    Agree Silas, when doing confederate I use cornmeal, and make them in the field style methods.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Pawleys Island, S.C.
    Posts
    214

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    Mr. Biederman is correct about the method for making salt pork. He is also correct by saying DO NOT use iodized salt. If you do the end result will be a piece of pork so salty that no amount of soaking or boiling will render it useful. I recommend using Morton's canning salt. I have used it for making salted pork and salted beef for several years and have great results.
    Tyler Underwood
    Pawleys Island, #409 AFM
    Governor Guards
    SCAR, WIG
    www.scareenactors.com

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    off the bottom of the scale
    Posts
    853

    Default Corntack receipe from the 145th Chickamauga LH.

    I got this from one of the people who made the corntack. I kind of enjoyed it, but then again, I'll greedily eat some foods in the field that I wouldn't eat at home.

    Two cups Rye flour,
    Three and one half cups corn meal,
    Half cup of melted pure lard,
    Two tablespoons baking soda, and
    One tablespoon salt.

    Mix in all the above with enough water to make the stuff look about like cement. Pour on a bread pan and roll about one half inch thick. Cut with a greasy hardtack cutter and bake at 350 for about 45 Min.
    - Silas Tackitt

    "I consider him a humbug, a man of small capacity, very obstinate, not at all chivalrous, exceedingly conceited, and totally selfish." - - Lafayette McLaws about James Longstreet.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    49

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    I want to thank everyone for their help and suggestion on what they know works great for them. I will begin experimenting with hardtack, cornmesh, and salted pork/beek. Want to try and get the most authentic rations possible.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Southern Minnesota
    Posts
    889

    Default

    We learned from bitter experience, that after you finish baking your hardtack, you must let it cool and cool and cool down. We thought after 3 or 4 hours that we were good to go. Didnt take 2 days for it to adapt a very period looking mold on it. The next batch, we laid out for several days. That stuff is now 4 years old and still quite edible.............well, again, as edible as very hard period hard bread can be. The stuff will last alright, right down to the weavels in it now and again!!!!
    Harley
    5th Minnesota Regt. Vol. Infy.,Co. C
    1st South Carolina Volunteers, Co. H
    New Ulm Battery
    Old West Regulators - Minnesota
    "I love my wife so much, I almost told her the other day!!" Old Norwegian
    http://fifthminnesotacompanyc.webs.com/

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