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Thread: My First Musket

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia, Pa
    Posts
    130

    Default My First Musket

    Hi all,
    This was the first black powder rifle I got at 12yrs old(196. i SAW A RIFLE IN A STORE AND DID NOT KNOW YOU COULD BUY THEM AT THE TIME( this was Hess's dept. store and it was a beautiful long rifle, custom made($350.). I bugged my parents awlful. Come christmas I received this rifle, my Dad bought it in woolworths for $25.00. Not what I thought but God bless him the BP frenzy was on. I learned everything I could from books.
    Trip to Dixie gun works when I was 16 and I bought a per. long rifle and accessories. Joined a bucks county range and set up some targets. The dixie guns spring was shot and would not bust a cap. Had the other one there and it shot very well. Most likly could have blown up seeing it is a smooth bore barrel, who knows if it was tested. I have loved to shot BP eversince and have never really owned any cartride guns.
    Thought you might like to see it. I am sure this will get deleted as waste of time.

    John C. Neugebauer

    20130529093814.jpg20130529093802.jpg20130529093822.jpg20130529093831.jpg
    Last edited by Sharpshot; 09-03-2013 at 04:49 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Monessen PA
    Posts
    142

    Default

    Cool. BP is highly addictive. My first, was a Traditions flintlock pistol. It wasn't until several years later, and two flintlock rifles later, that I first touched a BP percussion weapon. I still think that there is more elegance to the flinters, but they just don't have a role in my ACW impressions. The flint are still the primary ones that I snag when headed to the range to live fire, but the Sharps is just as satisfying in another way.

    And you do realize that your photo is a pair of brogans, right?

    Calum
    Calum Munro

    5th Virginia Infantry, Co H
    http://5thvacompanyh.webs.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia, Pa
    Posts
    130

    Default

    Hi Calum,
    sorry about that. Thought I had the pics attached and the only thing it attached was a old picture on file. Then I cut myself off. Great day on the computer. I am trying to reattach.

    Well the pictures work now, the date is 1968, don't know where that face comes from, it is not there when I go to edit.
    Still learning at 57.
    John
    Last edited by Sharpshot; 09-03-2013 at 04:52 PM.

  4. #4

    Default

    Wow! What a magnificently odd gun! It is what it is and just doesn't pretend to be anything else, does it? My first BP gun was a Brown Bess, the "Italian" repro that became available in the mid/late 70s. My parents gave it to me for Christmas in 1979. Original cost $125! Still fires just fine all these years later. I've reenacted with it, hunted deer with it, and even used it in US Army training. I developed a tank tactical range when I was a platoon leader. We used my Brown Bess to simulate the firing signature of an anti-tank weapon. (The tank negotiating the course then needed to take evasive action.) Fired that old gun a month ago and was reminded why I like it so much. That's one I will never part with, even if I have to sleep in my car!
    Rob Weaver
    Pine River Boys, Co I, 7th Wisconsin
    "We're... Christians, what read the Bible and foller what it says about lovin' your enemies and carin' for them what despitefully use you -- that is, after you've downed 'em good and hard."
    -Si Klegg and His Pard Shorty

  5. #5

    Default

    Hallo!

    A waste of time? Hardly!!

    These "non-guns" hold a special place in Reenacting History and evolution (or devolution depending upon one's knowledge of reproduction firearms).

    At the time, in the 1960's, these were being sold as "wall decorators" all over the place in response to a fad for fireplaces - and the nostalgic retro-tradition of hanging a 'gun' over the mantle.

    A number of years later, the demand for more authentic or realistic looking 'replica' firearms for the collectors' market in countries like Japan where firearms are outlawed, would see the rise of both zinc and plastic "model" guns and then the substituting of low grade steel, brass, and teak wood for the non-firing replicas.

    And, not too long ago, someone discovered that they could be jury-rigged and made to fire blank and even live rounds.. which has created the unresolved and partisan "Indian non-gun versus gun" controversy.

    Thanks for sharing. I had not seen one in a very long time.


    Also, some Hobby history with the 'Brown Bess" (P1768 NSLP musket). It is also historical in that, at the time, in 1974.75 the Brigade of the American Revolution had worked with Navy Arms to produce a decent reproduction (so-called) 2nd model Brown Bess in time for the Buy-centennial starting in 1975.

    Then when the Bicentennial was starting to unwind circa 1979/1980, Navy Arms dumped their inventory of "Besses" and "Charlevilles" for $125 or $150, and the kits for even less. To my knowledge, it was pretty much the last time a "partnership" of
    reenactors, importer, and Italian makers actually worked together to make a decent quality reproduction (exceptions, such as for example Colt conversion revolvers, etc., so noted)

    Curt
    Curt
    In gleichem Schritt und Tritt, Curt Schmidt

    Not a real Civil War reenactor, I only portray one on boards and fora.
    I do not portray a Civil War soldier, I merely interpret one.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Monessen PA
    Posts
    142

    Default

    'evening,

    Yup, the photos definitely look better! As I think Rob said, it is what it is and doesn't pretend to be anything else.

    I also think that it's cool that you and he still have your original BP rifles. I no longer have that flint pistol - although it went to a good home. A buddy thought he might like to try BP, so off we went to the range. Think at that time, I only had the three flints, an Enfield and probably a Colt. Anyway, he fell in love with the flints, so the pistol went home with him. His wife said he was like a kid with a new toy! One of these days, I'll pick up another one for myself...

    Calum
    Calum Munro

    5th Virginia Infantry, Co H
    http://5thvacompanyh.webs.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    King of Prussia, PA
    Posts
    1,588

    Default

    My got my first black powder rifle in 1963. It was an original Colt Special Model. The man who sold me the rifle threw in an original waist belt, cap box, and carbine cartridge box. I paid $125 dollars for the rifle. I had $50 dollars and borrowed the balance from my Dad. It took me the better part of a year to pay him back!

    I fired that rifle for about ten years, until the mainspring started getting weak. It was strong enough to pop a cap, but too weak to hold the hammer down on the cone when the weapon fired. It did speed up loading, since the rifle automatically went to half-cock after every shot!

    Like most of you, I still own that first rifle, plus a bunch more!
    Bill Rodman, If you need a really bad example.
    King of Prussia, PA
    wrodman1@aol.com

  8. #8

    Default

    There was even a Belgian musket in the middle 70s that was sold as the decoration part of a floor lamp. The ads were in Civil War Times Illustrated. I wanted one of those in the worst way!!! I saw one about 10 years later and I was shocked - no half-cock, not even pretending to be one.
    Rob Weaver
    Pine River Boys, Co I, 7th Wisconsin
    "We're... Christians, what read the Bible and foller what it says about lovin' your enemies and carin' for them what despitefully use you -- that is, after you've downed 'em good and hard."
    -Si Klegg and His Pard Shorty

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia, Pa
    Posts
    130

    Default

    I marched around the neighborhood in my made up uniform and shot a lot of redskins on tv with that gun. The nipple worked and was removeable for cleaning, 45cal. Nobody in my family had ever bought or owned a gun before. My next 1974 was a remington zouve , only thing in the gun shop that looked civil war I could afford ( $110.00) still have it , in great shape, lots of live firing. add to the collection, 1855 springfield, sharps rifle and 1860 revolver.
    Always wanted a brown bess and still do, always keeping an eye out. Thanks for the replies
    John

  10. #10
    Philip Cav Guest

    Default

    My first BP firearm was a fluted Colt Army (used) with no front sight. It cost $150 in 2008, after two events the pistol broke and I traded it to a friend for a Colt Navy. My first long arm was a Hopkins & Allen "Country Rifle" of 45 caliber. Cost me again $150. I still have it, but I carry mostly a 1861 Springfield that I bought from a friend..

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