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Thread: Favorite Period Music

  1. #21
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    Boyd Miles

    I dream of a world where a chicken can cross a road without having its motives called into question.

  2. #22
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    W. S. Lincoln describes soldiers of the 34th Massachusetts receiving a new clothing issue and singing "Oh Dear What Can The Matter Be" as they burned their old threads. Somewhere else I read that the same song was played or sung after military funerals, while marching back from the cemetery.
    M. A. Schaffner
    Midstream Regressive Complainer

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boyd Miles View Post
    Different tune in the period, though. I discovered the hard way at a Christmas event that the period tune does harmonize with the modern tune.

    Hank Trent
    hanktrent@gmail.com

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silas View Post
    You mean songs like In the Merry Month of May and Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair?
    Actually Silas I was leaning more towards Some Folks and Way Down in Ca-ai-ro.
    Tyler Underwood
    Pawleys Island, #409 AFM
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  5. #25
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    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
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    Default Favorite Period Music

    My Favorites:

    A' Rovin
    All Quiet Along the Potomac
    Angel Band
    Ash Grove
    Auld Lang Syne
    Aura Lee
    Beautiful Dreamer
    Banks of the Ohio
    Battle Cry of Freedom
    Battle Hymn of the Republic
    Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms
    Bile Dem Cabbage Down
    Blackest Crow
    Black Velvet Band
    Bonnie Blue Flag
    Buffalo Gals
    Cindy
    Cockles and Mussels
    Cumberland Gap
    Dives and Lazarus
    Dixie
    Drink To Me Only With Thine Eyes
    Evelina
    Gentle Annie
    Girl I Left Behind
    Glendy Burk
    Goober Peas
    Green Grows the Lilac
    Gypsy Rover
    Haul Away Joe
    Hard Times Come Again No More
    Ho! For California
    Home, Sweet Home
    Jeannie With the Light Brown Hair
    Johnny Has Gone for a Soldier
    Josephus Orange Blossum
    Lakes of Pontchartrain
    Li'l Liza Jane
    Lock Lomond
    Lorena
    Minstrel Boy
    Red Is the Rose
    Rising of the Moon
    Rose of Alabama
    Rosin the Beau
    Sally Goodin
    Shady Grove
    Shenandoah
    Shepherd's Wife
    Soldiers Joy
    Somebody's Darling
    Spanish Waltz
    Suwannee River
    Tom Dula
    Vacant Chair
    Wait For the Wagon
    Wayfaring Stranger
    Weeping, Sad and Lonely
    What Shall We Do With the Drunken Sailor
    When Johnny Comes Marching Home
    Wild Rover
    Will Ye Go, Lassie Go
    Yankee Doodle
    Yellow Rose of Texas

  6. #26
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    Oct 2012
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    Default Favorites, but more post-war

    I would just say that Southern Soldier, When Johnny Comes Marching home and Goober Peas were all attributed so late in the war they likely weren't sung by troops much during the war. GAR and Confed. post-war groups sure liked 'em.

  7. #27
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    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ_Artillery View Post
    I would just say that Southern Soldier, When Johnny Comes Marching home and Goober Peas were all attributed so late in the war they likely weren't sung by troops much during the war. GAR and Confed. post-war groups sure liked 'em.
    When Johnny Comes Marching Home was first published in 1863. I think it was wildly popular, at least with civilians, from 1863 to 1865. Goober Peas was first published in 1866, so you may be right about that one. When was Southern Soldier first published?

    On the other hand, a song being published in 1861 didn't guarantee wartime popularity either. Availability doesn't necessarily translate into popularity.

    Then you have all the sea chanteys popular with reenactors, but were they all popular with soldiers during the 1860s? And what about Minstrel Boy?

    But I suppose this thread is about reenactors' favorite period music not favorite songs of 1861-1865.

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