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Thread: Mississippi rifle question

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    HARRISBURG, PA
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    32

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    I've had the same issue with my Zoli the hammer and nipple not lining up correctly. I took it to the people at Lodgewood when they atteneded an event I was at and they came up with a solution. They replaced the nipple and for the life of me I cannot remember the size they used. But anyway it has worked like a charm ever since and I have not had any issues. Good Luck!
    BRYAN GUERRISI
    42ND MISSISSIPPI COMPANY F

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    1,196

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    At the Kazoo Living history show last weekend, I walked away from a Zoli "MIssissippi". Yhe price wasn;'t bad the guy wanted 275 for it. But it would fire at 1/2 cock, no ramrod, and a couple of other issues that were minor. And of course shouldve, and couldve has entered in it. I shouldve bought because I couldve fixed it. It was in nice shape other than that. Money is going to my trip to Shiloh instead. I can always get a sippi but can't ever again go to a 150th Shiloh.
    Cris Westphal
    Civil War Reenactor

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    279

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    Understanding that the only Lorenz is Indian made.. Is this "considered" 3 band and allowed in the rear rank. I saw them on 2 seperate events and they came along way .

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bedford, Virginia
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    457

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    The "take it to Lodgewood" solution would be what I would try, you might find a hammer that lines up or some other solution that they can help you with, it is hard to repair things over the net.
    As to the Indian so called Lorenz, I have not seen one that looks anything like the original so it would be a matter of barrel length and if the person on whose shoulder you are laying your pipe bomb doesn't object.
    Last edited by Boyd Miles; 03-23-2012 at 06:21 PM. Reason: Missing word was hunted down, clubbed and inserted in the proper place.
    Boyd Miles

    I dream of a world where a chicken can cross a road without having its motives called into question.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Spring Hill, FL
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    1,431

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    Moderator note: this isn't the thread to discuss Indian vs. others muskets. Start a new thread if thats the direction you want
    Ross Lamoreaux
    Moderator and Sewer of Historical Clothing and Tall Tales

    "But our opportunity to learn and grow, to communicate the richness of the lives that have gone before us, that does not change. We do not outgrow it. It does not tatter and fall apart in our hands..." -Mrs. Terre Lawson, 2010

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    279

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    I agree, I'm just stating I saw them in the ranks. So I wanted to know if was technically considered "3 band"

    Peter Griebel

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bedford, Virginia
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    Curt mentioned earlier that three bands can be found on short rifles, I don't think that can be the rule. A tape measure might be a better guide and if there is a question ask the people that can give you the correct answer for the event in question. Events tend to go with rules from other events that were used at other events many of them going back to the 125th or before, they don't even know why some of them are in place and they are often not based on safety or history.
    No matter how long the musket or pipe bomb in use the person using it can still make it dangerous. I have had to grab a muzzle and pull it forward away from my ear or grab a barrel and push it back to keep the cap out of my ear (eyes too, not just ears at risk). I have also had people correctly place two banders with no problem, it is a matter of knowing what you are doing and being aware.
    Boyd Miles

    I dream of a world where a chicken can cross a road without having its motives called into question.

  8. #18

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    Hallo!

    Interesting questions and replies.

    But yes, IMHO, much of what we do is because of us reenacting reenacting and it gets written on the stone tablets of Lore, Tradition, and the Way It Has Always Been Done.
    To the point that we actually refer to arms as "Three Banders" and "Two Banders."

    To paraphrase or put words into the mouth of the Frankenstein monster:

    "Three Banders, gooood. Two banders... baaaad."

    And it is easier to d*mn the weapon and ban it because of what is perceived/believed about them.... rather than try to deal with the training, discipline, and experience (or lack of) among random lads on the field.

    Curt
    Who has had ears rung and cap fragments in the side of the head and face from "3 Banders" more times than I can remember Mess
    In gleichem Schritt und Tritt, Curt Schmidt

    Not a real Civil War reenactor, I only portray one on boards and fora.
    I do not portray a Civil War soldier, I merely interpret one.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    King of Prussia, PA
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    1,583

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    Quote Originally Posted by reddiamond View Post
    The hammer does not line up correctly with the nipple. When fired, the inside, forward part of the cup hits the nipple- where it should hit the center of the inside. Kind of like the hammer was bent down. I don't know if this is the best description.
    However, the hammer does not appear to have been bent. It is like the angle where the hammer meets the nipple is off. This particular weapon was designed to use original CW nipples.

    Is this a common problem with Zoli Mississippi rifles?

    Any ideas or suggestions??

    Scot Buffington
    Scot,

    After years of inspecting Italian import weapons, I've found that the cone/hammer alignment is off more often than correct. I've gotten to the point that if there is a uniform "ring" on the hammer and the edge of the hammer cup doesn't actually hit the cone, I let it go. Otherwise, I'd be telling every third guy he needs to take his weapon to a gunsmith.
    Bill Rodman, If you need a really bad example.
    King of Prussia, PA
    wrodman1@aol.com

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Fargo, ND
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    106

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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt-Heinrich Schmidt View Post

    ... And it is easier to d*mn the weapon and ban it because of what is perceived/believed about them.... rather than try to deal with the training, discipline, and experience (or lack of) among random lads on the field.

    Curt
    Who has had ears rung and cap fragments in the side of the head and face from "3 Banders" more times than I can remember Mess
    Here here! Good point. Rifles and musketoons (gulp) were used by tens of thousands. We are ignoring a large portion of our ancestry and history by turning our backs on shoulder arms which are not "3 banders." I am a proponent of technology evolution during and preceding the war. Commonly, the firearms display shows a '61 Springfield, '59 Sharps, Smith Carbine, and a Henry. I've heard pray tell that some battalions have grouped their rifles into skirmish companies, which seems like a logical solution to the safety and authenticity issues.
    Respectfully,
    DB
    Den Bolda
    5th Minnesota Inf. Vols. Co. D.

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