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Thread: Bandages

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Bald Knob, AR
    Posts
    40

    Default Bandages

    Obviously, a CW surgeon should have a stock of bandages. Can these bandages be made at home or is there a source they should be procured through? I hope they can be home made and packaged at home... Instructions?

    I am new to Civil War reenacting (have done some frontier trapper) working on getting started as a surgeon in Gray and hopefully to be able to galvanize. I have been watching this board and it looked like a good place for info. As an old Navy HM who stayed in surgery for many years, I think the choice is a great one.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Nashville, Georgia
    Posts
    24

    Default Bandages

    That is a good question. The answer is as clear as mud I'm afraid. Basically it is a who, what, when, where, and why kind of situation. For instance, if your portraying Confederate at something like the siege of Atlanta where you have thousands of casualties coming in per day if not hour, you would have bandages made out of everything from bed sheets to shirts and they would often be hand rolled by ladies of a soldiers aide society or what have you. If you were somewhere else, you may have had "professionally" rolled bandages that were linen and rolled up by some aide society or sanitary commission in a rear area. I would highly recommend getting the book, Gangrene and Glory. It is all about this stuff and a very informative read. I hope this helps somewhat.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Leesburg, VA
    Posts
    61

    Default

    If you are talking about the common roller bandage, a good place to check is "The Hospital Stewards Manual" by Woodward. You can find it in google books. Pages 304-306 talk about sizes and how to roll them. It also gives basic instructions on how to make a bandage roller. Interestingly enough it also says that the roller bandages should be reserved for use with fractures as its length, up to 7 yards, is unwieldy especially in the field. They are relatively easy to make at home requiring only muslin, something to cut it to size and a great deal of patience. They need to be rolled tightly and a 7 yard strip of muslin can be frustrating. For a southern impression you could also use the bed sheeting or shirt material or whatever was on hand for the ladies to roll. Union surgeons would would have had access to better material.
    your obedient servant,
    Rick Etter
    Surgeon, 2nd Brigade
    Southern Division
    SOCWS

    "not really a surgeon, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    318

    Default

    I roll my own or use the ones we stock at the field hospital
    David Meister

    Surgeon C.S.A.

    1st Assistant Surgeon 108th Regt. Ills. Vols.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Bald Knob, AR
    Posts
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    Default

    Thanks all!

    Remember the old ace rollers? What I would give for one of them for some homework now!

    Having worked with some of the old roller bandages, I have a good idea how to make them but just wanted to do some de-farbed work. I hope I never ever need to use another for real... Good stuff for emergency splinting tho.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Bald Knob, AR
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    40

    Default

    Any other suggestions for soe home-made supplies I can do?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by SamVan View Post
    Any other suggestions for soe home-made supplies I can do?
    Scraping lint?

    Hank Trent
    hanktrent@gmail.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Bald Knob, AR
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hanktrent View Post
    Scraping lint?

    Hank Trent
    hanktrent@gmail.com
    Good thought! Begs the question, would modern dryer lint be anything like the lint used in bandaging a would? I know today we use plan gauze with or without an absorbent dressing, but almost always with some kind of non-stick dressing on a large wound. Naturally, I have seen a lot of surgery done today though an incision that had simply a band-aide placed on it.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by SamVan View Post
    Good thought! Begs the question, would modern dryer lint be anything like the lint used in bandaging a would? I know today we use plan gauze with or without an absorbent dressing, but almost always with some kind of non-stick dressing on a large wound. Naturally, I have seen a lot of surgery done today though an incision that had simply a band-aide placed on it.
    http://www.raggedsoldier.com/lint.pdf
    -Elaine Kessinger

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Bald Knob, AR
    Posts
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    Default

    Great article, Elaine! Thanks so much for sharing! I was wondering just what this lint is. Sounds kind of like dryer lint since it is mostly the fibers from clothing as well as the dust/shed skin caught in the clothing. At least dryer lint still has a great use as fire tender!

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