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Thread: Shelter half, Pole Height?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross L. Lamoreaux View Post
    The esteemed Mr. Hughes is correct - for artillery a gun tarp is quick, easy, and documented. I sent you answers to your PM as well, but as a Confederate unit, you've got a lot of options from tent flies, painted cloths, groundcloths, etc., and in a variety of materials from cotton drill, cotton duck, heavy linen (although linen usage dropped as the war progressed due to flax shortages), and hemp linen.
    Esteemed? WOW thank you for the Compliment Mssr Lamoreaux!!
    Bobby Hughes
    Co A, 2nd Battalion Ga Sharpshooters/64th Illinois Vol Infantry "Yates' Sharpshooters"
    Savannah Republican Blues
    Co C, 3rd US Infantry
    Ships of the Sea Maritime Museum & William Scarbrough House, Savannah, GA


    "I hope to live long enough to see my surviving comrades march side by side with the Union veterans along Pennsylvania Avenue, and then I will die happy." - James Longstreet at a Memorial Day Parade in 1902.

  2. #12
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    Michael, I started a thread a while back about an "artillery shroud". I heard a reference to it. Being uneducated in the matter, and frankly, never had heard of such a thing, Ross, as usual provided the info. It sounds like an absolutely fantastic bit of gear. Versatile, able to be used as a dining fly, lowered to provide a massive shelter...... Ross was saying that he made 2 and wouldn't consider another. A tremendous amount of work! And heavy too. 54 lbs. Since we portray a mid war unit, i was thinking that if the original shroud survived it would be in pretty rough shape. Replacement gear, would have probably been whatever they could get their hands on. That is if anything was even available... this is the essence of the hobby (from our side...). Use something that they MAY have used!

    Do you have any pix of your shroud? It would be great to see.

    Regards,
    Jerry
    Gerald Henry Calderone Jr.
    Simi Valley, CA

    sponger and rammer of cannons

    Richmond Howitzers

  3. #13
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    Indianapolis, IN
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    Not trying to jack your thread here, but for a really good read about how the federal artilleryman lived on campaign, check out this diary from Henry Campbell of the 18th Indiana Light Artillery: http://replica.palni.edu/cdm/compoun...e/id/417/rec/1
    I especially like the reference to the "cots" improvised from flour sacks, branches and forked sticks in the ground. Going to try these out this spring.
    Joe Snell
    18th Indiana Light Artillery

    "It's a disagreeable thing to be whipped."
    William Tecumseh Sherman

  4. #14
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    Wheaton, IL
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    Then there were the Iron Brigade lads who slept in hammocks....guess there were plenty of trees in the Wilderness?
    RJ Samp
    Horniste! Blas das Signal zum Angriffe!
    "But in the end, it's the history, stupid. If you can't document it, forget about it. And no amount of 'tomfoolery' can explain away conduct that in the end makes history (and living historians) look stupid and wrong. "

  5. #15
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    Ross, back in my slightly more hard core campaigner days, me and a pard tried the bayoneted-rifle-as-tent-pole system, and his rifle and bayonet worked splendidly because he had an original Enfield steel bayonet. My Springfield bayonet was a cheap Indian repro, and after setting it up, the slightest bump caused the musket to fall over, bending that bayonet to about 60 degrees. If I had been asleep in the tent at the time, I would have gotten clubbed in the head with my own musket butt.

    So if somebody is going to use muskets in lieu of tent poles, make sure you use original bayonets or high quality repros, at the least.
    Brett Gibbons
    3rd Regt. C.S. Engineers, Co. E
    www.hartsengineers.com

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brett View Post
    Ross, back in my slightly more hard core campaigner days, me and a pard tried the bayoneted-rifle-as-tent-pole system, and his rifle and bayonet worked splendidly because he had an original Enfield steel bayonet. My Springfield bayonet was a cheap Indian repro, and after setting it up, the slightest bump caused the musket to fall over, bending that bayonet to about 60 degrees. If I had been asleep in the tent at the time, I would have gotten clubbed in the head with my own musket butt.
    So if somebody is going to use muskets in lieu of tent poles, make sure you use original bayonets or high quality repros, at the least.
    That is most assuredly true - I've experienced it myself. Original bayonets - doable. Indian or Paki bayonets - ugly...
    Ross L. Lamoreaux
    Tampa Bay History Center
    www.tampabayhistorycenter.org
    On Facebook at: Tampa Bay History Center Living History Programs

    "The simplest things, done well, can carry a huge impact" - Karin Timour, 2012

  7. #17
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    Monessen PA
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    To go off on a slight tangent, how well do the sights hold up on the repro muskets with this sort of use? And along the lines of original bayonets, it's incredible how much lighter they are then the repros - people can't believe it when I hand them one of each...

    Calum
    Calum Munro

    5th Virginia Infantry, Co H
    http://5thvacompanyh.webs.com

  8. #18
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    Jul 2011
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    Interesting posts.

    I'm assuming it was not unusual for soldiers to also use heavy branches to construct a shelter tent framework?

    Joe Musgrove
    "I fight for Uncle Abe"

  9. #19
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    I would suspect any expedient at any given time would serve as a framework for shelter tents. I have yet to try the making of a raiders bunk; simple, quick to make. The modern day problem is having enough poles/saplings of the correct length available at an event site.
    Bernard Biederman
    30th OVI
    Co. B

  10. #20
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    Wood of any kind became quite scarce after an army rolls through an area, especially in cold and/or wet enough weather to justify even setting up a shelter half. As long as fires were permitted, you can imagine that in no time at all every scrap of burnable wood, including fence posts and anything else readily available, was burned. From what I've read, I would suspect the common soldier would rather use the wood to boil some of the salt out of his salt pork, than use it to prop up a shelter half.

    We've all been to reenactments where every scrap of wood gets burned, even the fallen branches from nearby trees. And that's just reenactors, for one weekend. We grumble and blame the event organizers for poor preparation, but it's really a very period-authentic problem!
    Brett Gibbons
    3rd Regt. C.S. Engineers, Co. E
    www.hartsengineers.com

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