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Thread: Favorite Songs

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Default Lil' Liza Jane is a little too young for us

    Search function, good. This is an old thread which could use some recycling.

    On my roadtrip to Perryville, I got a box set of Charlie Poole cd's which includes Goodbye, Liza Jane. It's a different song than the Lil' Liza Jane mentioned in this thread, but my looking at the lyrics for the Charlie Poole song today reminded me how I saw and heard one of the CS battalions at Perryville singing Lil' Liza Jane while marching to one of the battles. I hadn't heard Lil' Liza Jane at an event in a while so I made a mental note to look again for the song. I was pretty sure it was postbellum, but I wanted to give a fresh look.

    One of the places I looked was the search function here, but that wasn't the first place I looked. I saw the 1916 version in the Levy Collection, but didn't see anything before that there. I went to the Library of Congress site and didn't find Lil' Liza Jane at all. I did find a fun recording of the song from 1917. Link : http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recording.../autoplay/true

    This is a link to three pages of sheet music for Lil' Liza Jane as written in 1916 : http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/le...6.235;type=pdf The cover to this songsheet shows three doughboys. One has a harmonica, another has a ukelele, the last has a banjo.

    There's no question that this song is very post war, yet it still gets sung. What gives?

    Since I mentioned the Charlie Poole recording of a similarly named song, I'm including a link to the other Liza Jane, which has a publication date of 1871. Close, but no cigar. If you haven't listened to Charlie Poole, you're missing out. Link to Charlie Poole's version of Goodbye Liza Jane : http://youtu.be/x4703-wERdY
    - Silas Tackitt

    "I consider him a humbug, a man of small capacity, very obstinate, not at all chivalrous, exceedingly conceited, and totally selfish." - - Lafayette McLaws about James Longstreet.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Wheaton, IL
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Silas View Post
    One of the places I looked was the search function here, but that wasn't the first place I looked. I saw the 1916 version in the Levy Collection, but didn't see anything before that there. I went to the Library of Congress site and didn't find Lil' Liza Jane at all. I did find a fun recording of the song from 1917. Link : http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recording.../autoplay/true

    This is a link to three pages of sheet music for Lil' Liza Jane as written in 1916 : http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/le...6.235;type=pdf The cover to this songsheet shows three doughboys. One has a harmonica, another has a ukelele, the last has a banjo.

    There's no question that this song is very post war, yet it still gets sung. What gives?

    I'm including a link to the other Liza Jane, which has a publication date of 1871. Close, but no cigar. If you haven't listened to Charlie Poole, you're missing out. Link to Charlie Poole's version of Goodbye Liza Jane : http://youtu.be/x4703-wERdY
    Don't get started on "Marching Through Georgia" sung during events where staying in KY, surviving TN, or yet another setback in VA are very much the order of business.

    A buddy of mine sang this at Wilson's Creek.....Shiloh.....Battle of Westport.....and I heard someone singing it at 150th Manassas..... When I hear that one I always respond with an old favorite from the War of 1812....."In 1814 we took a little trip Along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty...."
    RJ Samp
    Horniste! Blas das Signal zum Angriffe!
    "But in the end, it's the history, stupid. If you can't document it, forget about it. And no amount of 'tomfoolery' can explain away conduct that in the end makes history (and living historians) look stupid and wrong. "

  3. #43
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    219

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    Thanks to Bill Bynum and The Carolina Fifes and Drums, http://www.fifedrum.org/ncfieldmusic/ ,I have too many favorites to mention.

    The most enjoyable musical moment for me came at Bentonville145.
    150 or so.men marching in step to Morning Parade, and the Field Music strikes up "POP Goes The Weasel"!
    And naturally all 150 of us 'popped" on cue.
    The men in the other units there were literally rolling on the ground laughing as we passed by.

    Regards,
    Kevin Ellis,
    26th NC

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