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Thread: The Army Wagon

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    19

    Default The Army Wagon

    I have tried the search function and the results were few. My question, is there a company that reproduces army wagons like the Studebaker? If so, could someone please point me in the right direction?

    Many Thanks,
    Thaddeus Parrott
    Edward Dobbins #164 AF&AM
    Sec'y Allendale #752 AF&AM
    Valley of Danville AASR
    Order of the Sword of Bunker Hill
    Independent Reenactor

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Forest City, PA
    Posts
    195

    Default plans

    I know ruralheritage.com has plans and a book on the army wagon, but I don't know how much of the info is CW era.

    Michael Dec
    Michael Dec
    McClung's Tennessee Battery
    http://armydrawers.echoes.net/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Wheaton, IL
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TKParrott View Post
    I have tried the search function and the results were few. My question, is there a company that reproduces army wagons like the Studebaker? If so, could someone please point me in the right direction?

    Many Thanks,
    I googled a site in under a second from a speeding train.

    http://www.hansenwheel.com/products/...ant_wagon.html

    Don't know of anyone making them without a down payment in hand...maybe another search could uncover that info?

    Sent from my iPhone
    RJ Samp
    Horniste! Blas das Signal zum Angriffe!
    "But in the end, it's the history, stupid. If you can't document it, forget about it. And no amount of 'tomfoolery' can explain away conduct that in the end makes history (and living historians) look stupid and wrong. "

  4. #4

    Default

    For plans you can check out Wild Horse Books & Art. I got mine there. It is two sheets of drawings 1 1/2 " = 1 foot scale done in 1959 for the NPS. It also includes a multi-page extract from the specification for the wagon.

    There is also a forum called the Reenacting Wagoneer. It is not as fluid as this forum, but you might find some info on there.

    You might also want to check out the Maine Cav's forum, as there was a thread with a list of people that had or were making wagons.

    Every now and then you might find an original on ebay. Usually they are under

    Sporting Goods > Outdoor Sports > Equestrian > Driving, Horsedrawn
    or
    Antiques> Primitives

    I am sure that Mrs. Lawson will weigh in on this as she is the resident wagon chaser...
    Mike Schramm

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Tuskaloosa, Alabama
    Posts
    4,194

    Default

    Giggle.......

    My wagon is due out of the shop in the spring. Then I intend to ride in one of those little short legged chairs in the back, just like Irene Ryan.

    The Reenacting Wagoners Forum is a quiet little place--primarily because we tend to burn up the phone lines instead, and consult on every little thing. Sooner or later we'll get to writing stuff down, but right now the circle is widening rapidly, and the pressing need to bring folks up to speed quickly does not lend itself to scholarly thought.

    Hansen Wheels is the place for a turn key, but also high dollar, period wagon.

    Restoring a wagon made later in the century is another option, and many of us have chosen that route. Concealed improvements such as the Sarvin Hub increase wheel life, and reduce the possibility of catostrophic hub failure. The use of a variety of wagons is much more justifiable for Confederate efforts, with impressed freight wagons being the prime conveyance. In the research for In The Van, we found many of these early Confederate wagoners coming off active businesses hauling freight on the Santa Fe Trail.

    There are highly experienced folks like Nathan Stark (Wagonmaster for Cleburn's Division) or Gerry Barker (primarily 18th century, but an ox driver for nearly 60 years) who guide and shape the ideas emerging---they've been at this for a long time. For a number of others, this effort emerged out of a desire to make the 150th's something more than the same-ol-same-ol for ourselves, and to add value to events in a unique way. The result is a rapidly growing group of wagon drivers and support staff.

    Make no mistake--this in not an 'impression' as such---one has to really be willing and able to do the work, and there is a lot of it to do. My own logistical head has come to the notion that with a full wagoner's camp in operation, with wagons coming and going 24/7, primarily in use as water movers ---it takes 5 people PER WAGON, and more happily, 7, to provide all the support work required to keep animals groomed and fed, food cooked, coffee on, fires going, wash water hauled, meals on the table, and portable food in hand. Each wagon going out needs a minimum of a wagoner/driver, a brakeman/assitant wagoner, and an outrider,---and really needs two outriders. That's four folks, and four animals (two hitched, two ridden) when a wagon goes out.

    With every move, we discover more skilled folks, with wagons and teams, who know how to drive and take care of animals--that's the essential skill here. (Mrs. Simpson made a new friend in a horse drawn cab driver last weekend in St. Louis) He's ready to come play---and we'll aid him in getting dressed. The learning curve is steep in stepping into the historic mindset--but the first essential is 'can you drive?'

    Now, I'll be right up front here about compromises---I'm a short round girl. The wagon in my custody is 12 feet long, an unsprung one board grain box. Historically, those had neither brake nor step. The driver stopped it with the team, and climbed up by placing foot on hub, and swinging leg over the side of the box. This works if The Almighty actually issued one legs that reach the ground. Instead, I've added an extended iron step in order to keep my slow self off those wheels, and a hand brake to aid in holding the team at a stop. If I thought a seat belt would do me any good, I'd have one of those too, but the only way for me to deal with a wrecking wagon is to gather up my petticoats and JUMP.

    Nathan Starke also makes a market in wagons and teams--he can be contacted through the Cleburn's website here:
    http://www.nstarhitches.com/cleburne..._wagoneers.htm
    Mrs. Lawson
    Weaver, Spinster, Strong Fast Dyes
    Knitted Goods and yarns available thlawson@bellsouth.net



    Moderator, When I remember. We got Rules here!



  6. #6

    Default Mrs. Lawson, you are...

    ...a National Treasure.
    Too bad most people don't realize it.
    I am looking forward to seeing you again --and helping you shoulder the load-- at First Manassas and Wilson's Creek this year.
    May God bless you!
    Julio
    Julio C. Zangroniz, Independent Photojournalist
    www.zphotos.smugmug.com
    Jzangroniz@comcast.net

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spinster View Post
    My wagon is due out of the shop in the spring. Then I intend to ride in one of those little short legged chairs in the back, just like Irene Ryan.
    Like this picture of Ms. Ryan?

    Mike Schramm

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Tuskaloosa, Alabama
    Posts
    4,194

    Default

    Giggle.

    Most folks don't realize that Irene Ryan was a great beauty in her younger years.

    They remember her this way



    Note that is is NOT a Civil War era outfit,--not hat, nor dress, nor glasses. Mrs. Ryan is impeccably dressed for the year 1890.
    Mrs. Lawson
    Weaver, Spinster, Strong Fast Dyes
    Knitted Goods and yarns available thlawson@bellsouth.net



    Moderator, When I remember. We got Rules here!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Esperance, NY
    Posts
    1,992

    Default Do You Have Amish

    Quote Originally Posted by TKParrott View Post
    I have tried the search function and the results were few. My question, is there a company that reproduces army wagons like the Studebaker? If so, could someone please point me in the right direction?

    Many Thanks,
    Near by?

    If you give them the plans they can probably knock one up for you at a reasonable price with very little down payment.

    If you don't want the full sized 6 mule model you might even be able to get a "stock" wagon off the Amish that with a paint job and accessories will fit the bill.

    While the US Army had a "regulation" wagon I've seen a lot of pictures of wagon parks that seem to have a number of 'non-regulation' freight wagons in them. I suspect that due to the massive demand (at the same time that private industry was increasing it's demands for transportation) created by the war that wagon manufacturers just couldn't keep up and any wagon reasonably close in size and weight carrying capacity was acquired to meet the need.
    Bob Sandusky
    Co C 125th NYSVI
    Esperance, NY

    "Out beyond the ideas of wrong doing and right doing there is a field. I'll meet you there." -
    Mawlana Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Balkhi

    "If you find yourself in a fair fight, someone screwed up." - A new variation of Murphy's Law based on current Military experience in Iraq:

    “In war the first principle is to disobey orders. Any fool can obey orders!” - First Sea Lord Admiral Sir “Jackie” Fisher

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Southern Illinois (Jackson County)
    Posts
    28

    Default Original wagon...

    There is a guy with the Logan's Brigade in Illinois that has an original Q.M. wagon. He bought it out of a small CW museum that was closing... He may have some insights as to where to come up with one, since he did a total restoration on his.

    Hansen is a great company, but high dollar. You can find a period type wagon for way less and if you have basic carpenty skills do much of the work yourself (I'm restoring a post war spring wagon now). Randy Steffens books The Horse Soldiers, Vol. II (?) has some beautiful to scale drawings of a jerk team wagon in it. There is a whole issue of brake style, when it came about etc...

    Drop me an e-mail at ziarnek[at]frontier[dot]com if you'd like to talk about this some more. Z

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