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Thread: Yellow Kepis?

  1. #1
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    Default Yellow Kepis?

    Was there a Confederate cavalry unit that ever wore the yellow, yellow topped or yellow banded kepis?
    Respects, Scott B. Lesch

    My History and Toy Soldier "blog"

    http://ilikethethingsilike.blogspot.com/


    Helping my employers achieve the American Dream since 1978.

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  2. #2
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    In Confederate regulations of 1861; they call for a grey forage cap with branch color (yellow) around the bottom edge of the cap. In January 1862, it was changed to the cap being the branch color, with a dark blue band. That being said I have never found any issuing records that list the caps being trimmed with yellow or yellow being the main color. If the color is listed, the ones that I have seen just list them similar to the following: "50,000 caps ready cut (grey cloth) with peak".

    There is one officers kepi that I could find made to regulation standards. The following is from Don Troiani's Civil War Cavalry and Artillery:

    " Regulation kepi for cavalry officer worn by Capt. Julian G. Pratt of the 18th Virginia Cavalry. The elegant cap body of yellow wool (slightly faded) is bedecked with a gold lace quatrefoil on the crown and is finished off with a humble oilcloth visor...."


    I would seriously doubt that many (if any) where ever issued out of the depots of the South.

  3. #3
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    Thanks Andrew. I've only seen those regs and some modern illustrations. I'll save the paint on the figures I'm doing.
    Respects, Scott B. Lesch

    My History and Toy Soldier "blog"

    http://ilikethethingsilike.blogspot.com/


    Helping my employers achieve the American Dream since 1978.

    If there's one thing I can't stand seeing, it's Americans fighting Americans.
    ~Dan Aykroyd as Sergeant Frank Tree in 1941

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbl
    Was there a Confederate cavalry unit that ever wore the yellow, yellow topped or yellow banded kepis?
    Based upon the number of said items I've seen at reenactments, yellow kepis must have been issued commonly during the war. All those cavalry reenactors must be basing their impressions on fact, right?
    - Silas Tackitt

    "I consider him a humbug, a man of small capacity, very obstinate, not at all chivalrous, exceedingly conceited, and totally selfish." - - Lafayette McLaws about James Longstreet.

  5. #5

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    Yes Sir, because we know that all those sutlers only sell authentic wares, copied directly from originals in their collection!! BULL CRAP!!!

    I wish sutlers would only sell authentically made stuff. Life sure would be easier and I could have saved a crap load of money getting it right the first time!!! The lying turds!

    That last parts free,
    Andrew Schultz
    Possum Skinners Mess

    Don't tell people you do things "exactly like they did" while standing in front of a wall tent you share with your wife with the four poster bed, cooler, camp stove, and heater etc. Be honest with yourself and the people you are talking to.--Robert Collett, 2010

  6. #6
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    Morgan Wolfe Merrick illustrates caps with red and yellow bands in his illustrated journal published as From Desert to Bayou.
    Phil Graf
    Texas Ground Hornets
    "Touch me and I'll sting"

  7. #7
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    Lets not forget that piller of historical correctness, Mort Kunstler, with his painting of a Florida cavalryman a number of years ago, complete with yellow kepi and Fed sky blue trousers.
    http://books.google.com/books?id=diz...avalry&f=false Click on the book cover in the top left corner for a better view
    Ross L. Lamoreaux
    Tampa Bay History Center
    www.tampabayhistorycenter.org
    On Facebook at: Tampa Bay History Center Living History Programs

    "The simplest things, done well, can carry a huge impact" - Karin Timour, 2012

  8. #8
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    Funny, I've been interested in this stuff since the sixties, and guessed myself that those CSA Regs were "more of a guideline than a code" as Capt Barbossa might say.

    I've learned not to say never until I've looked or asked. Thanks folks.
    Respects, Scott B. Lesch

    My History and Toy Soldier "blog"

    http://ilikethethingsilike.blogspot.com/


    Helping my employers achieve the American Dream since 1978.

    If there's one thing I can't stand seeing, it's Americans fighting Americans.
    ~Dan Aykroyd as Sergeant Frank Tree in 1941

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross L. Lamoreaux View Post
    Lets not forget that piller of historical correctness, Mort Kunstler, ....
    Heck, I could never get past the fact that Kunstler's a hack artist much less look long enough to see that his work didn't depict historically correct items! Kunstler is one of the worst out there. In fact, there are darn few artists out there that are technically good artists, much less concerned about authenticity. I have only seen two fellow's work that even halfway come off as good art, much less authentic. Naturally Troiani is one and the other is Keith Rocco (his style is loser than Troiani, but it is excellent art).

    Of course, we are talking the contemporary guys. There was Winslow Homer, etc. back in the era and they were classic artists with good technical skills with the pen and/or brush.

    WTH
    The DaVinci Mess
    Yuma gonna luv it

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by indguard View Post
    Heck, I could never get past the fact that Kunstler's a hack artist much less look long enough to see that his work didn't depict historically correct items! Kunstler is one of the worst out there. In fact, there are darn few artists out there that are technically good artists, much less concerned about authenticity. I have only seen two fellow's work that even halfway come off as good art, much less authentic. Naturally Troiani is one and the other is Keith Rocco (his style is loser than Troiani, but it is excellent art).

    Of course, we are talking the contemporary guys. There was Winslow Homer, etc. back in the era and they were classic artists with good technical skills with the pen and/or brush.

    WTH
    The DaVinci Mess
    http://www.americanahistoricalart.com/ and http://us.st12.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.c...2044_140987876 Add Rick Reeves to the list. As much as I love Troiani and Reeves, they don't hold a candle to Winslow Homer. Nothing like having been there when it happened to make a painting come to life....
    Last edited by Ross L. Lamoreaux; 09-12-2009 at 01:02 PM.
    Ross L. Lamoreaux
    Tampa Bay History Center
    www.tampabayhistorycenter.org
    On Facebook at: Tampa Bay History Center Living History Programs

    "The simplest things, done well, can carry a huge impact" - Karin Timour, 2012

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