View Poll Results: Should we have a separate area for medical impressions?

Voters
31. You may not vote on this poll
  • No, not necessary at this time.

    5 16.13%
  • Yes, in a separate conference all by itself

    5 16.13%
  • Yes, but in a conference with other branches of service

    21 67.74%
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Thread: Medical Staff Reenactors

  1. #31
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    Default

    Noah,

    From reading your "AAR", I can see you had a very busy weekend. As far as the other "stuff" (soldier syptoms and such), I'll post the rest when I get home.
    I Remain, Your Obedient Servant,
    Jimmy "Doc" Nelson
    Moderator (well, sometimes . . hehehe )
    ** We have Rules here! **

    Daylight Lodge # 760 F&AM
    Honorable Order of Kentucky Colonels


    In honor of my 3rd Great Grandfather: "John Daniel Nelson", Surgeon, 4th Georgia Infantry, CSA


  2. #32
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    Default Civil War Medicines

    List of Civil War Medicines

    The items in this list are taken from the contents of the U.S.Army Medicine Pannier. The numbers indicate the item's location in the pannier, to prevent mix-ups. Also listed are modern look-alikes for reenactors to put in their bottles and tins. Items are listed by Latin name, common name, amount in the pannier, (D) description, (A) action, and (L) look-alike.

    1 Ceratum Cantharidis Cantharides (Spanish Fly)-3 Oz
    D: Gray-Brown w/ green specks; A: Blistering agent; L: Mixture of baking soda, tea, charcoal, parsley flakes

    2 Argenti Nitras Silver Nitrate-1 Oz
    D: White Salt; A: Antispasmodic, stimulant; L: Rock Salt

    3 Argenti Nitras Fusus Lunar Caustic-1 Oz
    D: White or gray pencils; A: Stop minor bleeding; L: Styptic pencil

    4 Iodinium Iodine-1 Oz
    D: Blue-Black crystal; A: Corrosive, diuretic, mixed with alcohol makes tincture of iodine; L: Iodine crystals (available at chemical supply house)

    5 Antimonii et Potassae tartras Tartar Emetic-1 Oz
    D: Transparent, colorless crystal; A: Purgative, diuretic; L: Cream of Tartar

    6 Hydrargyi Chloridum Mite Mild Mercurous Chloride (Calomel)-1 Oz
    D: Light buff or ivory powder; A: purgative, anthelminthic; L: Translucent face powder

    7 Extract of Beef Beef Extract-1 Lb
    D: Brown powder or cubes; A: Nutritive in diarrhea, dysentery; L: Beef bullion cubes or powder

    8 Extract of Coffee Coffee Extract-1 Lb
    D: Brown paste; A: Stimulant; L: Instant coffee moistened with molasses

    9 Condensed Milk Condensed Milk-1 Lbs
    D: White paste; A: Nutritive in diarrhea, dysentery; L: Sweetened condensed milk (Borden's)

    10 Black Tea Black Tea-4 Oz
    D: Dark brown powder; A: Astringent, gentle excitant; L: Loose tea leaves

    11 Spiritus Frumenti (Whiskey)-24 fluid oz
    D: Brown liquid; A: Stimulant and depressant; L: Jack Daniels

    12 Spiritus Aetheris Nitrici Spirit of Nitrous Ether-8 Fl Oz
    D: Colorless or yellowish liquid; A: Diuretic, carminative; L: Ether (starting fluid) or yellowed alcohol

    13 Alcohol Fortius Strong Alcohol-12 Fl Oz
    A: Used to dissolve solid medications; L: Rubbing alcohol

    14 Cough Mixture Cough Mixture-12 Fl Oz
    D: Red, yellow, or clear syrup; A: Expectorant, antitussive; L: Cough Syrup (Robitussin)

    15 White Sugar White Sugar-10 Oz
    A: Nutrient, antiseptic, preservative; L: White Sugar

    16 Chloroformum Purificatum Chloroform-12 Oz
    D: Colorless liquid; A: Anesthetic by inhalation; L: Water with a touch of green color

    17 Linimentum Simplex Liniment-12 Fl Oz
    D: White syrupy liquid; A: Emollient; L: Watkins White Liniment, Corn Huskers Lotion

    18 Syrupus Scillae Syrup of Squills-8 Fl Oz
    D: Clear syrup; A: Expectorant, diuretic; L: Corn syrup

    19 Aqua Ammoniae Spirits of Hartshorn-8 Fl Oz
    D: Clear liquid; A: Stimulant; L: Household ammonia

    20 Spiritus Aetheris Compositus Hoffman's Anodyne
    D: Yellowish liquid; A: Stimulant and carminative-4 Fl Oz; L: Ether (starting fluid) or yellowed alcohol

    21 Tincture Opii Laudanum-6 Fl Oz
    D: Reddish-brown liquid; A: Pain relief, control of diarrhea; L: cola syrup with a dash of barak

    22 Extractum Cinchonae Fluidum Fluid Extract of Cinchona (Peruvian bark)-4 Fl Oz
    D: Reddish-yellow liquid; A: tonic, antimalarial, syphilis, rheumatism; L: Red colored alcohol

    23 Extractum Valerianae Fluidum Fluid Extract of Valerian-6 Fl Oz
    D: Yellowish-green liquid; A: Sedative; L: yellow-green colored alcohol

    24 Extractum Zingiberis Fluidum Fluid Extract of Ginger-6 Fl Oz
    D: Amber Liquid; A: stimulant, colic, dyspepsia; L: ginger ale or brandy

    25 Oleum Olivae Olive Oil-6 Fl Oz
    D: pale yellow oil; A: mild laxative, emollient for skin disease; L: Olive Oil

    26 Oleum Terebinthinae Oil of Turpentine-6 Fl Oz
    D: Colorless liquid; A: stimulant, diuretic; L: Turpentine

    27 Glycerina Glycerine-6 Fl Oz
    D: Straw color syrup; A: Antiseptic, emollient; L: Glycerine

    28 Tincture Opii Camphorata Paregoric Elixir-6 Fl Oz
    D: Brownish-green liquid; A: antispasmodic, diarrhea, nausea; L: Campho-phenique mixed with vanilla

    29 Liquor Ferri Persulphatus Ferric Sulphate-Green Vitriol-4 Fl Oz
    D: Blue-green liquid; A: Tonic; L: Blue-green colored alcohol

    30 Spiritus Ammoniae Aromaticus Aromatic Spirits of Ammonia-4 Fl Oz
    D: Yellowish liquid; A: stimulant, antispasmodic; L: ammonia with iodine and Campho-phenique

    31 Pilulae Catharticae Compositae Cathartic Pills-50 Doz
    D: White solid; A: Cathartic; L: White pills

    32 Pilulae Colocyntii et Ipecacuanha Ipecac Pills-50 Doz
    D: White solid; A: appetite stimulant, expectorant, emetic; L: White pills

    33 Pulvis Ipecacuanhae et Opii Dover's Powder in 5 gm pills-30 Doz
    D: White solid; A: Diaphoretic, treat dysentery, diarrhea; L: Powdered milk (for the powder form)

    34 Pilulae Quiniae Sulphatis Quinine Sulphate-40 Doz
    D: yellow pills, 3 gram ea; A: tonic, malaria, fevers; L: brown sugar

    35 Potassae Chloras Potassium Chlorate-4 Oz
    D: White Salt; A: Refrigerant & diuretic; L: Rock Salt

    36 Potassae Bicarbonas Potassium Bicarbonate-4 Oz
    D: Transparent, colorless crystal; A: Antacid, dropsy, rheumatism; L: baking soda

    37 Potassae Iodidum Potassium Iodide-4 Oz
    D: opaque white/transparent crystal; A: expectorant, treatment of syphilis; L: baking soda w/ touch of red food color

    38 Sodae et Potassae Tartras Rochelle Salt-4 Oz
    D: Colorless, large crystal; A: purgative; L: Rock Salt

    39 Liquor Morphiae Sulphatis Morphine solutition-4 Fl Oz
    D: whitish liquid; A: anodyne, soporific; L: cloudy sugar water

    40 Pilulae Camphora et Opii Camphor & Opium Pills-20 Doz
    D: Reddish-green; A: tranquilize intestines, non-specific diarrhea; L: old fashioned licorice rolled as pills

    41 Pilulae Hydrargyri Mercury Pills (Blue Mass)-40 Doz
    D: blue pill; A: laxative in small dose, cathartic in large dose; L: light wedding cake dressings, spritzed with light blue food coloring.

    42 Pilulae Opii Opium Pills-60 Doz
    D: dark brown; A: sedative, pain relief; L: whole allspice

    43 Acidum Tannicum Tannic Acid-1/2 Oz
    D: white/yellowish powder; A: Vegetable astringent; L: Lemonade mix

    44 Alumen Alum-3 Oz
    D: White powder; A: diarrhea, astringent, whooping cough; L: Alum

    45 Collodium Maynard's Adhesive Liquid-3 Fl Oz
    D: transparent syrup; A: Dressings, skin ulcers; L: Tincture of benzoin

    46 Creasotum Creasote-2 Fl Oz
    D: oleaginous yellowish liquid; A: wounds, ulcers, consumption, diabetes; L: Lysol cleaner (be careful!)

    47 Extractum Aconiti Radicis Fluidum Extract of Aconite Root-3 Fl Oz
    D: yellowish-brown liquid Rheumatism, gout, scrofula, syphilis, cancer; L: vanilla extract with yellow food color

    48 Extractum Colchici Seminis Fluidum Extract of Colchicine-3 Fl Oz
    D: Reddish-brown liquid; A: sedative, pain relief, gout; L: vanilla extract with red food color

    49 Extractum Ipecacuanhae Fluidum Extract of Ipecac
    D: Yellowish liquid-3 Fl Oz; A: emetic, expectorant; L: Ipecac syrup

    50 Tinctura Ferri Chloridi Tincture of Ferric Chloride-2 Fl Oz
    D: Brown liquid; A: tonic & diuretic; L: vanilla extract

    51 Plumbi Acetas Lead Acetate Sugar of Lead-3 Oz
    D: White crystal; A: astringent & sedative; L: Coarse white sugar

    52 Zinci Sulphas Zinc Sulphate-3 Oz
    D: colorless, transparent salt; A: tonic, astringent, emetic
    Last edited by "Doc" Nelson; 09-01-2006 at 05:15 PM.
    I Remain, Your Obedient Servant,
    Jimmy "Doc" Nelson
    Moderator (well, sometimes . . hehehe )
    ** We have Rules here! **

    Daylight Lodge # 760 F&AM
    Honorable Order of Kentucky Colonels


    In honor of my 3rd Great Grandfather: "John Daniel Nelson", Surgeon, 4th Georgia Infantry, CSA


  3. #33
    Join Date
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    Default Moulages

    Trauma and medical emergency "simulations" using wound moulages and makeup are the most effective "hands-on" experiential learning scenarios that Scouts can have, and will challenge their decision making and judgment abilities to deal with simulated life threatening emergencies. Studies have shown that retention of skills and knowledge
    learned through simulations is higher than any other form of education for such training.

    Most of all the youth really enjoy simulations and will want to create their own scenarios using the makeup techniques. After such experiences, it is highly likely that they will be far better prepared to deal with real life safety emergencies if they have participated in well designed and realistic practical simulations of trauma and
    medical scenarios. Here are some methods and techniques for creating such scenarios.

    Theatrical "Blood"
    Our "Formulas" for Simulated Blood:
    A. Thicker Theatrical Type Blood (Stays in Place on Extremities, Clothing)
    1 bottle Karo corn syrup
    2 bottles red food coloring
    1 or 2 drops of blue food coloring
    (mix well)
    A small amount of chocolate syrup can also be added to provide a more translucent appearance for the Karo Syrup.
    (Note: empty out some of the corn syrup before adding the food coloring and chocolate syrup to allow for proper \ mixing in the original container to avoid "overflow.")

    B. Flowing Simulated Blood
    (Works Well in Blood Pumps for Moulages and "Coagulates" When it Dries)
    1 bottle Sta-Flo liquid starch
    2 bottles red food coloring
    1 or 2 drops of blue food coloring
    (mix well)
    A little chocolate syrup also works in this mix for realism as well.

    Blood Pumps
    If you have a local hospital supply contact, try to get some IV blood pumps and 1000 ml bags of normal saline. Empty the saline from the bag and then use a large 60 cc syringe to load and fill the bag with your "sta-flo starch" theatrical blood mix. Hook up the blood pump to the bag and route the end of the tubing into your simulated wound.

    The pump can be held in the palm of the "victim" and the tubing routed inside their shirt from the bag to the "wound." Tape tubing and the bag in place as needed for the scenario. You can pump the blood through the tubing and into simulated wounds to create the appearance of "arterial" spurting blood. Very realistic and very scary for first aid students, but they remember what an "arterial bleeder" looks like and what to do for it!

    Burns
    1 bottle theatrical "Liquid Latex"
    1 bottle glycerin
    1 tube theatrical grease paint in black, red clothing to "char" or scorch with small torch

    -paint on and smooth out liquid latex to a thin film on skin; allow to dry. Be sure "victims" don't have latex allergy before applying to skin

    -when dry, with a finger, pinch or pull up spots on the film to simulate the appearance of 'broken' blisters and "loose" skin.

    -for 3rd degree burns, take some small pieces of charred cotton fabric and glue them down with liquid latex near the burned area.

    - You can also *carefully* char or "scorch" the portion of the garment(s) that the victim will be wearing for the practical exercise. Scorch or burn the clothing (shirt or pants) that will be nearest the burned area with a small propane torch, then extinguish the flame with water and let it dry.

    -apply thin layer of red grease paint inside "blister" area and around burned area to simulate "reddening" of skin due to thermal injury.

    -apply some thin black for effect to simulate charred skin or clothing for third degree burns. Alternatively, use a thin layer of white clown makeup/grease paint and apply over liquid latex to simulate third degree burn, surrounded by reddened and blistered second degree burns

    -apply glycerin inside "blister" and allow it to run out on the extremity to simulate oozing lymphatic fluid.

    Scar Wax
    Theatrical "scar wax" can be used to mold simulated open wounds. Work it like modeling clay until it is warm and pliable, then apply to skin. Use a blunt table knife to create the "open wound" or laceration. If you are using a blood pump (see below) insert the clear plastic tubing into the simulated wax wound. Color the inside of the "wound" with dark red grease paint for "subcutaneous tissue" appearances.

    If you are using commercial moulages or theatrical moulage wax, to simulate lacerations, fractures, etc., also use some neutral pancake or liquid skin-colored makeup to blend edges into normal skin for realism. Attach small moulages with "spirit gum" or surgical adhesive used for prosthetic devices.

    Internal Bleeding
    To simulate blunt trauma to the chest or abdomen, create "bruising" by using dark red and blue mix (to make purple discoloration) grease paint and create a "site" injury (e.g. a steering wheel impression on the chest, or for abdominal trauma from an impact with a blunt object, create a large bruised area on the abdomen. Have the victim simulate
    rigidity and severe pain of the abdomen to indicate internal bleeding. A classic sign of a ruptured spleen with abdominal bleeding and shock, is "referred pain" in the area of the collar bone, when there is no apparent injury to the collar bone (clavicle) which is sometimes missed by rescuers, but is a potentially life threatening condition.

    Shock
    Be sure to make your victims look "shocky" by applying a THIN film of clown white makeup or grease paint and blend in well, to give them a very pale effect. lips can be made to appear "cyanotic" by applying a THIN film of blue grease paint. Blend everything well so it doesn't appear to be artificial. Apply glycerin droplets with a small spray
    bottle with a glycerin and water mix around the mouth and nose to simulate "diaphoresis" or perspiration due to shock.

    Coaching "Injured Victim" Actors
    For "inexperienced victims," with "traumatic injuries (e.g., fractures, internal injuries, lacerations) coach them to exhibit "pain" by moaning or occasionally gasping (be sure they don't hyperventilate by doing this too often or they will actually pass out). (e.g., Victims should respond to the rescuers attempting to help them, by moaning if the rescuer touches or moves an injured extremity).

    Remember that very severely injured victims in shock are often very "quiet" so that is a good indicator of the severity of the injuries (possible internal and/or head). For medical (non-trauma) simulations (e.g. anaphylactic shock, diabetic hypoglycemia), altered mentation is often a good way to convey that the victim has a medical life threatening condition (victim acts intoxicated or irrational for hypoglycemia, or becomes lethargic and incoherent for anaphylaxis
    (e.g., allergic reaction to a bee sting or food allergy such as peanuts).

    Heart Attack
    Have the victim complain of a dull "pressure" type pain in the area of the sternum ("it feels like someone is standing on my chest" is an accurate and classic response to a rescuer when assessing a possible heart attack with chest pain). Also simulate radiating pain to the upper arm, elbow, and jaw or back, combined with nausea. . Simulate "diaphoresis" or sweating around the mouth and forehead with glycerin and water mix applied with a small spray bottle. This often
    accompanies a heart attack. Denial is a classic response of first time heart attack victims who may attribute the nausea and chest pain to "bad food."

    Cleaning Up After The Exercise
    Cleanup latex with cold cream or Vaseline or "goop" waterless hand cleaner rubbed into moulage, then wash off with soap and water.

    Stains on clothing from food coloring used in burns can be cleaned up by soaking in cool water overnight, then laundering.

    If stain persists, use a small amount of chlorine bleach to remove the pink stain. Wear old clothes that you don't mind getting messed up for these practicals.
    I Remain, Your Obedient Servant,
    Jimmy "Doc" Nelson
    Moderator (well, sometimes . . hehehe )
    ** We have Rules here! **

    Daylight Lodge # 760 F&AM
    Honorable Order of Kentucky Colonels


    In honor of my 3rd Great Grandfather: "John Daniel Nelson", Surgeon, 4th Georgia Infantry, CSA


  4. #34

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by "Doc" Nelson
    Items are listed by Latin name, common name, amount in the pannier, (D) description, (A) action, and (L) look-alike.
    I assume many of these are meant for display only, and not for living history use.

    In general, in medical reenacting, what safeguards are in place to prevent the accidental confusion of look-alikes for display that are unsafe to consume, with look-alikes meant to be given safely to any reenactor?

    Like using a pistol for live fire and then taking it into a reenactment, it seems too easy to confuse real medicines or poisons with harmless ingredients, especially if several reenactors are pooling their items or taking turns doing presentations. Will everyone really remember what can be used and what can't?

    Not good for a patient to show up with a fake ailment and be expecting fake medicine, and be given real ipecac or real ether or rubbing alcohol to swallow.

    Hank Trent
    hanktrent@voyager.net

    4 Iodinium Iodine-1 Oz
    D: Blue-Black crystal; A: Corrosive, diuretic, mixed with alcohol makes tincture of iodine; L: Iodine crystals (available at chemical supply house)

    12 Spiritus Aetheris Nitrici Spirit of Nitrous Ether-8 Fl Oz
    D: Colorless or yellowish liquid; A: Diuretic, carminative; L: Ether (starting fluid) or yellowed alcohol

    13 Alcohol Fortius Strong Alcohol-12 Fl Oz
    A: Used to dissolve solid medications; L: Rubbing alcohol

    14 Cough Mixture Cough Mixture-12 Fl Oz
    D: Red, yellow, or clear syrup; A: Expectorant, antitussive; L: Cough Syrup (Robitussin)

    19 Aqua Ammoniae Spirits of Hartshorn-8 Fl Oz
    D: Clear liquid; A: Stimulant; L: Household ammonia

    20 Spiritus Aetheris Compositus Hoffman's Anodyne
    D: Yellowish liquid; A: Stimulant and carminative-4 Fl Oz; L: Ether (starting fluid) or yellowed alcohol

    26 Oleum Terebinthinae Oil of Turpentine-6 Fl Oz
    D: Colorless liquid; A: stimulant, diuretic; L: Turpentine

    28 Tincture Opii Camphorata Paregoric Elixir-6 Fl Oz
    D: Brownish-green liquid; A: antispasmodic, diarrhea, nausea; L: Campho-phenique mixed with vanilla

    30 Spiritus Ammoniae Aromaticus Aromatic Spirits of Ammonia-4 Fl Oz
    D: Yellowish liquid; A: stimulant, antispasmodic; L: ammonia with iodine and Campho-phenique

    44 Alumen Alum-3 Oz
    D: White powder; A: diarrhea, astringent, whooping cough; L: Alum

    46 Creasotum Creasote-2 Fl Oz
    D: oleaginous yellowish liquid; A: wounds, ulcers, consumption, diabetes; L: Lysol cleaner (be careful!)

    49 Extractum Ipecacuanhae Fluidum Extract of Ipecac
    D: Yellowish liquid-3 Fl Oz; A: emetic, expectorant; L: Ipecac syrup

  5. #35
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Bath, Maine
    Posts
    463

    Default

    Comrades,

    Hank, that's a darned good point. I go to great lengths to ensure the neutrality of the items I carry with me, not only because i am concerned with reenactors, etc, but i don;t want some kid stealing some bottle from me and trying it out for kicks, and ending up sick or worse for the experience.

    I use items like powdered sugar, powdered instant coffee (gotta love the period mortar and pestle) cinnamon, all spice, baking soda, simple syrup, etc. with added food colorings and flavouring oils to create inert but realistic copies of actual meds. I would challenge anyone to a comparison testing of my fakes against the real item, regarding consitancy, color, aroma and flavour.

    As far as the hobby goes, it's caveat emptor. Mostly, i view it from a litiginous viewpoint. I work hard, and then some, to temper my displays and talks with the idea that someone might steal something, hurt themselves and/or another, and try and sue me. I document my work and recipes, etc, with that in mind and go from there.

    Doc, I still refuse to use fake blood, bloody aprons, and many moulages in my displays. the operating area was kept seperate from the patient recovery area, and rarely visible to passing soldiers, etc, for morale reasons. it was bad enough what went on there, but there was no use in exposing everyone else to it. My prsentations center around minor wounds, disease, and initial triage prior to shipping off to the Division Hospital area.

    My concerns are two-fold. First, it's hard to do it right qith out appearing hokey and Hollywoodish. Yeah, trauma surgery is messy. there's no getting around that, and yes, it was a very real part of war (and still is). But Hollywood and less than scrupulous writers have bent things out of all concern regarding the hospital, and it will take a long time to undo that damge.

    Second, there's a real war going on, and I don't need to remind anyone about what those costs entail. I simply refuse to immerse myself in fake blood and secinbd-rate moulage and hollywoood chicanery to appease some sicko's sense of theatre.

    I'll leave it at that for now, but i will add this, i suppose: The Medical aspect of the hobby has a d*mned long way to go to catch up to the rest of the impressions. It's suffered for many years from both complacency and a lack of actual interpretation based upon facts. Hopefully that will be changing, but it will take time.

    Respects,
    Tim Kindred
    Medical Mess

  6. #36
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    Default

    I use items like powdered sugar, powdered instant coffee (gotta love the period mortar and pestle) cinnamon, all spice, baking soda, simple syrup, etc. with added food colorings and flavouring oils to create inert but realistic copies of actual meds. I would challenge anyone to a comparison testing of my fakes against the real item, regarding consitancy, color, aroma and flavour.

    This is one HUGE reason I was hoping for a Thread/Folder or something where those of us that portray Medical Officers and Staff, could share ideas and such. I welcome any and all suggestions, comments, ideas and the like. If there are better ways that myself, or anyone else could use, by all means let us know.

    I assume many of these are meant for display only, and not for living history use.

    Yes, they are. I only use items that can be consumed. I will never have anything on display, nor use any “simulated” medicine that could not be safely consumed. I guess this is something that we, as individuals, would have to be disciplined to do.

    Doc, I still refuse to use fake blood, bloody aprons, and many moulages in my displays. the operating area was kept seperate from the patient recovery area, and rarely visible to passing soldiers, etc, for morale reasons. it was bad enough what went on there, but there was no use in exposing everyone else to it. My prsentations center around minor wounds, disease, and initial triage prior to shipping off to the Division Hospital area.

    My impression is based on that of an Assistant Surgeon of the Regiment. So, personally, I don't "do" the fake blood and such. I know that there are quite a few that do. My presentations have only been, pretty much on the field (as an Assistant Surgeon would have done his work, if you will, for lack of a better description), during Living Histories. What I focus on is, setting up a forward aid station, or as it's sometimes called, a "Field Dressing Station", and triage the wounded. And, I have also do a few "speeches" on Civil War Medicine and Surgeons. I travel lightly. I only use what I can carry, which is an "Ed Archer Pocket Surgeon's Kit", "Roll-Up Kit", some bandages, a small medicine case that holds 10 medicine bottles (I alternate the types of medicines, but mainly the common ones are what I use the most of). As stated above, I only use ingredients that can be consumed, safely. I am also looking to "pickup" a stethoscope, here in the near future.

    I welcome any and/or suggestions, ideas and such. I would rather "hear" it from those that are 'veterans' and have experience, then to "go it alone". This is the main reason I was hoping for a thread like this.

    Thanks for all of your ideas and such. And, please, by all means, feel free to reply, email or whatever you'd like to do. Again, thank you.
    I Remain, Your Obedient Servant,
    Jimmy "Doc" Nelson
    Moderator (well, sometimes . . hehehe )
    ** We have Rules here! **

    Daylight Lodge # 760 F&AM
    Honorable Order of Kentucky Colonels


    In honor of my 3rd Great Grandfather: "John Daniel Nelson", Surgeon, 4th Georgia Infantry, CSA


  7. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Wherever the Navy sends hubby
    Posts
    139

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by "Doc" Nelson
    I welcome any and/or suggestions, ideas and such. I would rather "hear" it from those that are 'veterans' and have experience, then to "go it alone". This is the main reason I was hoping for a thread like this.
    You might want to try and meet up with Trevor Steinbach if he makes it to Perryville. I worked with him for quite a while as one of his nurses. He's the medical director for the 1st Federal Division. If you're not already a member, you also might want to consider joining the Society of Civil War Surgeons (which reminds me, hubby and I need to renew our membership).

    Thanks for the tips on stage blood. I had to mix up a batch in a hurry today for DH. Wasn't about to spend the cash for the top quality stuff since I wasn't going with him to the event to do moulage for him.

    Regarding using latex--try experimenting with gelatin

    http://www.makeup-fx.com/gelatine.html
    http://www.makeup-fx.com/gelatinefoam.html

    I haven't had the chance to experiment with it yet--some things can be a bit difficult to find in my neck of the woods. I'm doubting I'll be able to locate glycerin or sorbitol here.
    Last edited by celtfiddler; 09-01-2006 at 09:49 PM.
    Kimberly Schwatka

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Wherever the Navy sends hubby
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    Default Possible substitution

    44 Alumen Alum-3 Oz
    D: White powder; A: diarrhea, astringent, whooping cough; L: Alum
    I've never seen alum, but I wonder if cornstarch or baking powder might pass in it's place. Both are relatively cheap and harmless.
    Last edited by celtfiddler; 09-01-2006 at 09:56 PM.
    Kimberly Schwatka

  9. #39

    Default

    There are so many ways to integrate medical roles into reenacting, maybe it would help to look at some of the different visions for what's expected of medical staff. Here are some types that I've noticed:

    --Living history display with lectures to the public, maybe a brief demonstration after the battle or at specific times. Main goal is to offer displays and talk to the public about historic medicine in a general sense; after hours is free time. This fits in well with mainstream events and EBUFU public-interpretation living histories, and was about all I could find when I was into military medical roles in the 1990s.

    --Functional living history role, acting as a period doctor throughout the event, performing duties in real time, adapted to the specific situation being reenacted. May include interpretation to the public or not. This is harder to fit into an event, due to lack of willing patients and more strain on the logistics of organizers who are already stretching things thin. I've seen this done at Payne's Farm (non-public), at Burkittsville 2001 (public), and I could picture it fitting into events like Immortal 600. But where it doesn't fit, one common compromise is...

    --Modern medical care. Main goal is to be there for reenactors with modern health problems. At mainstream events, doctors carry modern first aid kits and women act as ice angels and the medical tent is the modern first aid station. Medical participants interested in historic medicine only are strongly discouraged or not allowed. At campaign events, doctors carry modern items and treat real-life sore feet or similar health problems not bad enough to require dropping out but not able to be treated with period methods. This was the other only option I could find back in the day.

    Hank Trent
    hanktrent@voyager.net

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    You might want to try and meet up with Trevor Steinbach if he makes it to Perryville.

    Kimberly,
    I have been talking with Trevor about Perryville. My "role" for Perryville will be that of the Indiana Brigade's Surgeon. So, hopefully, I'll have an opportunity to get together with Trevor. I know I'll be pretty busy, but Trevor hopes that I can "break away" at some point to be able to 'hang out' at Division HQ for a bit.

    Thanks for the tips on stage blood.

    Well, no problem, as far as the suggestions I had posted about symptoms, medicines & substitutes and moulages. These were from another colleague. He asked if I would post them here, because he accidently deleted them from his saved file. Thanks.
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