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Thread: 1842 springfield

  1. #1
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    Default 1842 springfield

    Is there any way you can tell if a 2 band 1842 is legit or has been altered from a three band, such as barrel lenght etc, going to look at a original and its a 2 band, thought someone would know! Thanks

  2. #2

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    The 1842 was a musket, meaning by definition that it was a "3-band." The terms 3-band and 2-band are modern anachronisms. The 1842 smoothbore was intended as a general infantry arm. The short arm of the day, the "2-bander," was the 1841 "Mississippi" rifle. I would say almost without exception that any 2-band 1842 has been cut down. Which raises another question: is 1842 a proper identification for the piece?
    Rob Weaver
    Pine River Boys, Co I, 7th Wisconsin
    "We're... Christians, what read the Bible and foller what it says about lovin' your enemies and carin' for them what despitefully use you -- that is, after you've downed 'em good and hard."
    -Si Klegg and His Pard Shorty

  3. #3
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    Bill,

    The Standard M-1842 Musket will be a .69 cal smooth bore barrel 42 inches long. A stock length of 55 1/4 inches and an Overall finished length of 57 3/4
    You may find some that are rifled. This will not cause these other measurements to change. The only difference with be the use of a rear sight. Not all Rifled Musket will have a rear sight added.

    There is a Rifle length firearm made at Springfield Armory in 1847. These are in effect two band versions of the standard M-1842. They are not, however, cut down Muskets. These are made as Rifle length firearms with 33 inch barrels and a 46 1/4 stocks at Springfield.
    Blair Taylor

  4. #4
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    Bill,

    One more thing I almost forgot to mention These '42 Rifles will only be marked Springfield and the date of 1847 to the rear of the hammer. No other makings are correct. Forward of the hammer where there would normally be stamped the Springfield Eagle over U. S., These firearms will NOT have the Eagle Over U. S. to be correct and they will have a long range rear sight that is unique to the M-1842 rifled firearm.
    Blair Taylor

  5. #5

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    Hallo!

    "Which raises another question: is 1842 a proper identification for the piece?"

    Kinda, sorta, mostly.

    It is the Musket, Model of 1842.

    However, the Ordnance Manual refers to it as "Musket of 1842" as well.

    And the 1861 U.S. Ordnance Manual and its clone the 1863 Confederate Ordnance Manual also refers to the "rifle musket model 1842" (which can drive moderns crazy for not followng the technical musket, rifle musket, and rifled musket appelations).

    There is one exception to the "3 band" configuration, and that was the 3,200 made in 1847 for the Fremont Expedition being not only sighted and rifled, but reduced to a 33 inch barrel length and a 48 1/2 inch overall length.

    The basic M1842 design was also used for the "musketoon" series of the Model 1847 Artillery Musketoon, the Model 1847 Cavalry Musketoon, and the Model 1847 Sappers Musketoon (aka Sappers and Miners) with "2 bands" and a 26 inch barrel.
    Some lads mistake the musketoons for "cut down" muskets.

    CHS
    In gleichem Schritt und Tritt, Curt Schmidt

    Not a real Civil War reenactor, I only portray one on boards and fora.
    I do not portray a Civil War soldier, I merely interpret one.

  6. #6
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    "Some lads mistake the musketoons for "cut down" muskets."

    Some do indeed.
    It is however very important to note here that the lock and bolster section on the standard M-1842 Musket is entirely too large for the M-1847 series of Musketoons as made at Springfield. These '47 series of arms will more closely match the size variation of the M-1841 (Mississippi) Rifle.
    Blair Taylor

  7. #7
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    Default

    And you also have the M-1842's that were cut down by the Cornfeds, for use by their cavalry.
    Bill Rodman, If you need a really bad example.
    King of Prussia, PA
    wrodman1@aol.com

  8. #8
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    Default re

    thanks guys for all the info. next question what would be a "ballpark" figure for value for a cut down in very nice shape and complete?

  9. #9

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    Hallo!

    Correct..

    As done by Richmond, the M1842 cut-downs scrapped the double loop front band/nose cap, cut off the stock ahead of the middle band spring and simply tapered and rounded off the stock sans nosecap.

    CHS
    In gleichem Schritt und Tritt, Curt Schmidt

    Not a real Civil War reenactor, I only portray one on boards and fora.
    I do not portray a Civil War soldier, I merely interpret one.

  10. #10
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    Default It is worth...

    less than an unaltered 1842 full length. It is technically worth what somebody is willing to pay for it. I have seen these for $500 to $700.
    Craig L Barry

    Author: The Civil War Musket: A Handbook for Historical Accuracy

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