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AP Hill
07-29-2008, 03:03 PM
Because most folk interested in history read a lot, this is just a quick thread,asking everyone : what are you reading at this time?

I currently am reading...

A Terrible Glory-Custer and The Little Big Horn by James Donavan...and,

Red Clay to Richmond,Trail of The 35th Georgia Infantry Regiment CSA by John Jay Fox lll


AP

sbl
07-29-2008, 03:31 PM
My Brave Boys to War With Colonel Cross & the Fighting Fifth by Mike And Mark Travis.

About time too as I've marched with the 5th NHV for about 15 years.

Ross L. Lamoreaux
07-29-2008, 03:54 PM
I'm currently rereading "The Truth About Chickamauga" by Archibald Gracie.

Tom Scoufalos
07-29-2008, 04:05 PM
"The Green Dragoon"...a 50-some-year-old piece on Banastre Tareton.

ejazzyjeff
07-29-2008, 04:22 PM
"The Slaves' War: The Civil War in the Words of Former Slaves" by Andrew Ward.

And James M. McPherson's book called "Hallowed Ground: A Walk at Gettysburg".

Abrams
07-29-2008, 05:26 PM
'Gettysburg Requiem' by Glenn LaFantasie Its about Col. William Oates life. He was a very interesting fellow according to this book.

I just finished 'General Lee's Army' by Joseph T Glatthaar Well documented and an interesting read.

bizzilizzit
07-29-2008, 05:36 PM
Because most folk interested in history read a lot, this is just a quick thread,asking everyone : what are you reading at this time?

AP


Women Who Kill by Ann Jones 1996

Drygoods
07-29-2008, 05:36 PM
At the moment, "Genteel Rebel - The Life of Mary Greenhow Lee" but am on the lookout for something about Kate Chase, Varina Davis, or even Jeff Davis. Any suggestions? Plus, has anyone read that book about Mary Lincoln's clothing?

sbl
07-29-2008, 05:36 PM
"Colonel Gracie was a keen amateur historian and was especially fascinated by the Battle of Chickamauga at which his father had served. He spent a number of years collecting facts about the battle and eventually wrote a book called The Truth about Chickamauga. He found the experience rewarding but exhausting; in early 1912 he decided to visit Europe without his wife Constance (née Schack) and their daughter in order to recharge his batteries. He traveled to Europe on RMS Oceanic and eventually decided to return to the United States aboard RMS Titanic."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archibald_Gracie#Legacy

He was known as kind of a long winded speaker and in the US Senate investigation of the Titanic sinking he was asked to be brief. Luckily he wasn't and his testimony has a lot of details.

I haven't read his book but I portrayed him at a Titanic party.

paul hadley
07-29-2008, 05:53 PM
Before At High Tide, I picked up "Generals in Bronze: Interviewing the Commanders of the Civil War" and editor William Styple autographed at the visitor's center.

The illustrator/sculptor who's the book's author kept extensive notes of his post-war interviews with the officers he was commissioned to represent. He has a definite bias toward Sheridan so it's interesting to read his comments on those he perceived as threats to his boyhood idol.

Anyway, I'm enjoying this light reading. Styple adds some notes for clarity.

Paul

sbl
07-29-2008, 07:03 PM
Not bad if you've read about Sergeant Roger Lamb..,,

Fusiliers: The Saga of a British Redcoat Regiment in the American Revolution by Mark Urban

I'm still working on this one along with the 5th NHV/Colonel Cross book noted above.

sbl
07-29-2008, 07:07 PM
At the moment, "Genteel Rebel - The Life of Mary Greenhow Lee" but am on the lookout for something about Kate Chase, Varina Davis, or even Jeff Davis. Any suggestions? Plus, has anyone read that book about Mary Lincoln's clothing?


Is this it?


McCreary, Donna. FASHIONABLE FIRST LADY: THE VICTORIAN WARDROBE OF MARY LINCOLN: Charlestown, IN: 2007. 1st ed., 182p., Acknowledgements, bibliography, endnotes, glossary, index, photographs, illus., dj.
Price: $26.95

"

Drygoods
07-29-2008, 07:14 PM
Is this it? McCreary, Donna. FASHIONABLE FIRST LADY: THE VICTORIAN WARDROBE OF MARY LINCOLN: Charlestown, IN: 2007. 1st ed., 182p., Acknowledgements, bibliography, endnotes, glossary, index, photographs, illus., dj.
Price: $26.95"

Yes, that is the book. Has anyone read it, and what are your thoughts? I'm wondering if it has examples of her clothing through photographs or just descriptions with modern replicas?????

Brian Wolle
07-29-2008, 07:14 PM
A great book on the Fox sisters -who had "rappings" in their family's house in the 1840s that would answer questions et cet. The author is not convinced of the authenticity of it, but there were just too many creditable people there, including Horace Greeley, who checked it out everywhich way. Some ladies even took the girls in the backroom and stripped them.

Plus an american heritage book on G-burg. Sorry to be such a broken record...

Sgt_Pepper
07-29-2008, 07:26 PM
... but there were just too many creditable people there, including Horace Greeley, who checked it out every which way.

:lol: Horace Greeley... creditable... :lol:

No offense, Mr. Wolle, it just struck my funny bone.

andysmith1989
07-29-2008, 07:30 PM
I am reading Gone For Soilders. This is a book by Jeff Shaara. It follows Capt. Lee and Gen. Scott during the war with Mexico in the 1840's.

Brian Wolle
07-29-2008, 09:53 PM
Greeley may have been many things, but a liar, he was not. Unless you know better, Mr Lennon.

Sgt_Pepper
07-29-2008, 10:01 PM
Greeley may have been many things, but a liar, he was not. Unless you know better, Mr Lennon.

Sir, I protest! I've never thought for a moment he was a liar and I certainly intended no such meaning. Lying is intentional, a willing prevarication of the truth. Horace Greeley was a man of passionate convictions, but it must be noted that his convictions changed nearly as often as the weather. That was what amused me. :cool:

netnet81
07-29-2008, 10:12 PM
"The Slaves' War: The Civil War in the Words of Former Slaves" by Andrew Ward.

I'm reading that too; are you enjoying it? I expected more of a civilian slant and less explanations of troop movements, etc. but I'm still getting a lot out of it.

jurgitemvaletem
07-29-2008, 10:23 PM
Now I kinda feel bad! Seems like ages since I read anything Civil War. Been reading a bunch of WWII stuff. I am currently reading "Brothers in Battle 'Best of Friends" By Bill Guarnere and 'Babe' Heffron on their experience with "Band of Brothers"

Next up is "Call of Duty" by Lynn "Buck" Compton about his experience with "Band of Brothers".

Yep, I got a full shelf of "BoB" books. :)

I just finished "Island of the Lost", a book about 2 shipwrecks on the Auckland Islands taking place in 1864-65, right time period I guess but wrong side of the world!

Brian Wolle
07-29-2008, 10:43 PM
That was one of his most endearing qualities, sir. He "explored" new things that were coming out and reported back as to how and what it was. The country at large learned as he did. The weekly Trib went as far west as possible and everyone knew him. His opinions DID change. I see no prob there. There's good and bad in everything including our befuddled brains ("speak for yourself, Mr Wolle").

Just a Procol Harum quote, Mr Lennon.

Sgt_Pepper
07-29-2008, 11:15 PM
Just a Procol Harum quote, Mr Lennon.

Oh, now there's a blast from the past! :mrgreen:

Texasbutternut
07-29-2008, 11:29 PM
Now reading Clive Cussler's "Deep Six", which features some Louisiana reenactors who help Pitt save the day by engaging the enemy from the deck of a steamboat with Enfields and two cannon.
Also reading Cussler's "The Navigator", Brian Wolle's "Lincoln's Hope", and "Fourteen Hundred And 91 Days" by William Heartsill, which is a day to day account of life with the W.P. Lane Rangers during the WBTS.

Hank Van Slyke
3rd Texas Lt. Artillery
Battle Of Selma (http://www.flatfenders.com/scv/selma88.htm)

ejazzyjeff
07-30-2008, 08:27 AM
I'm reading that too; are you enjoying it? I expected more of a civilian slant and less explanations of troop movements, etc. but I'm still getting a lot out of it.


It is okay. Like you, I expected more of a slave's point of view of what happened, but I think he spent more time on the troop movements. I am about the half way point of the book, and it seems that it is finally getting more about the slaves reaction about what was happening around them.

Micah Trent
07-30-2008, 08:54 AM
An autographed edition of Gene Hackman's "Escape From Andersonville". Just another typical novel.

Huck
07-30-2008, 10:02 AM
Currently I have re-started to read Lee's Miserables again. I purchased it more than a few years ago and never got really into it (at the time). Now that I am stuck in Colorado, I find myself with nothing but time. Now on a sad note I was in Borders right off Manassas, and I wasn't impressed with the very small (in my humble opinion) selection of books there on the War Between the States.

Steve Blancard
07-30-2008, 10:55 AM
"The Journal of Jane Howison Beale"

This is perhaps the best civilian account of the Civil War years in Fredericksburg. Beale was born in Fredericksburg in 1815, one of twelve children. Jane married William Churchill Beale in 1834, at the age of nineteen.
Her journal cover the years of 1850-1862. Her descriptions of events leading up to and including the battle of Fredericksburg in December of 1862 are refreshing and reveal a very different perspective.

Since I live in Fredericksburg, it is especially interesting to walk by her home and the downtown area and imagine what it was like in 1862. Her descriptions are vivid and facinating. The original Jane Howison Beale Journal is on display at the Fredericksburg Area Museum and Cultural Center.

ejazzyjeff
07-30-2008, 12:51 PM
I just started Did Lincoln Own Slaves? And Other Frequently Asked Questions by Gerald J. Prokopowicz. The author has collected about every questioned asked about Abe and made it into a book.

I like the book so far, it's not dry reading and the author does add some humor.

netnet81
07-30-2008, 02:09 PM
It is okay. Like you, I expected more of a slave's point of view of what happened, but I think he spent more time on the troop movements. I am about the half way point of the book, and it seems that it is finally getting more about the slaves reaction about what was happening around them.

Oh good. I really didn't want to be disappointed with it.

Radar
07-30-2008, 03:20 PM
Andrew Ward's River Run Red about the Fort Pillow disagreement with NB Forrest.

goatgirl
07-30-2008, 06:28 PM
The Women of the Confederacy by J. L. Underwood and War Songs and Poems of the Southern Confederacy by H. M. Wharton

3rd_PA_Artillery
07-30-2008, 07:11 PM
Allegiance: Fort Sumter, Charleston, and the Beginning of the Civil War by David Detzer as well as An Imperishable Fame: The Civil War Experience of George Fisher McFarland by Michael Dreese.

GaWildcat
07-30-2008, 08:09 PM
Just cracked open Decision In The West after GAC I needed something Western Theatre

Spinster
07-31-2008, 01:14 AM
Memoirs of Life In and Out of the Army in Virginia During the War Between the States
Susan Leigh Blackford /Charles Minor Blackford 1894

Meditations
Marcus Aurelius 170

An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of The Wealth of Nations
Adam Smith 1776

And there are a couple of dusty volumes of Cowpers around here that have lost their covers and half their bindings, so I have no idea which book I'm reading or when it was published.

ejazzyjeff
07-31-2008, 08:17 AM
Oh good. I really didn't want to be disappointed with it.


Don't know were you are at on the book, but once you get 1864, it starts to get more into the slave's accounts and avoids a lot of the battle details, which I think is how the whole book should have been.

DColeman
07-31-2008, 12:52 PM
Rereading the history of the 138th

Gettysburg (Newt Gingrich/Forstchen) version

Columbia Rifles Research Compendium II

The Haunted Painting - Plus 5 Other Stories of Horror. Great short story about Cedar Creek....Sorry Shameless plug, that's my book. :cool:

hoosiersojer
08-01-2008, 04:06 PM
Just finished The Iron Brigade, a Military History, by Alan T.Nolan. It's a classic and I can never read enough about those "Black Hats".;-)

I am just now starting The 4th Ohio, by William Kepler. This one was out of print and HARD to find...,I'll say. Had to read this one, for obvious reasons, (if not,see signature below) not to mention the there doesn't seem to be a heck of a lot of documentation on the Regt. that just so happens to be my alder mater.:D

Si Klegg and his Pard is on the back burner, but at the rate I am given to enjoy a good read it may be in the next decade before I get to that one...:(

Brian Wolle
08-02-2008, 02:00 AM
Wasn't there a "Wealth of Nations" by Harry Carey that the Republicans, including Abraham Lincoln, adhered to?

5 th Alabama Infantry
08-02-2008, 04:51 AM
Biography of George C. Marshall

madisontigers
08-02-2008, 12:09 PM
I'm tearing through my "interlinear Bible," as well as devouring "Corporal Si Klegg and His Pard." I am also dabbling a bit in "Rabbi Jesus."


Books that I just finished include: "Washington Artillery", the one about the AOT battery. I also recently finished reading "The Complete Roman Army."

Dave Long

Remise
08-15-2008, 05:07 PM
I just completed "Reveille in Washington," by Margaret Leech, which is about life in our nation's capital during the war. She won a Pulitzer Prize for the book, but that may have had something to do with the fact that she also married a, or maybe the, Pulitzer.

Inasmuch as I work in D.C., change Metro trains at Fort Totten and get off at the Farragut North stop, I found this book quite entertaining and informative. The author was able to draw me back to 1861, and she clearly knew her subject, as well as the personalities of the era, quite well, and could in one phrase sum them up quite concisely (if sometimes in an acerbic manner).

For example, I loved this sentence, describing the atmosphere in Washington following Early's withdrawal in 1864: "From the Seventh Street Road, the alarms of war had vanished overnight, leaving a scene as empty of initiative as the brain of General Halleck."

I am now on the verge of starting Donald McCaig's novel, "Jacob's Ladder," which comes highly recommended by a friend. When somebody tells me he has read a book he liked better than "The Black Flower," I pay attention.

B.C. Milligan
Company K, First Penna. Reserves

Longbranch 1
08-16-2008, 08:19 AM
Just re-reading "Reveille In Washington " myself. The intrigue, particularly concerning the "abolishment" of habeus corpus and the Old Capitol Prison is both sad and funny.

Regards,
Kevin Ellis,
26th NC

Abrams
08-16-2008, 12:07 PM
Hardtack and Coffee

Again, heh. :)

Curt-Heinrich Schmidt
08-16-2008, 12:14 PM
Hallo!

"Von Achten der Letzte: Amerikanische Kriegsbilder
aus der Südarmee des Generals Robert E. Lee, von einem ehemaligen königl. preuß. Einjährig-Freiwilligen."

;)

CHS