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harley_davis
06-23-2006, 11:31 AM
Gentlemen.
Apparantly I did not get the beeswax seal in my tin canteen to seal as well as it should have. Now, two years later, the entire layer of beeswax has detached itself from the sides of the canteen and is floating about inside, rendering it fairly useless. The question I put forth for consideration is, has anyone else had to deal with the headache of removing all the beeswax from inside the canteen? The chunks are large enough that they dont just fall out as one would hope. I fear it is going to be a project of determination to fish the pieces out, one by one. It would be somewhat humorous if it wasnt such a good canteen. I suppose it is a long shot to hope that someone has a "silver bullet"? I thank you in advance.
Respectfully,

Sgt_Pepper
06-23-2006, 02:00 PM
I assume you lined the canteen with beeswax by heating it until the beeswax melted, then rolled it about until the interior was coated. Why not try removing it by heating it until the beeswax melts, then let it run out the spout?

MStuart
06-23-2006, 03:26 PM
The good Sgt may have the only option short of driving yourself nuts trying to make the pieces small enough to fall out. Then re-beeswax it to keep the rust from forming.

Mark

harley_davis
06-24-2006, 03:26 PM
Sgt.,
That would explain why I have yet to aquire any stripes. Obviously, I thought I needed some long winded complicated solution when the simplier thing was right there. Goes to show the K.I.S.S. theory transcends all time!! I may never achieve status beyond rank and file. Thank you Sergeant.
Repectfully,

Sgt_Pepper
06-24-2006, 09:22 PM
You're quite welcome, Private Davis. Keeping an eye on the men isn't nearly the trouble it is to take care of the junior officers. The stories I could tell... :rolleyes:

Rob
06-28-2006, 03:51 PM
I received a tin canteen for Christmas 2004. No beeswax, and the only rust is an approximately 1/4" "stripe" where the two halves meet. All that's needed is a little care.

Keep the canteen as nearly full as possible - no oxygen, no rust.

When you get home from an outing:

1. Dump most of the water out, leaving about half a cup inside. Using a small spoon or funnel, put about a tablespoon of baking soda in. Slosh this mixture around and pour it out. Shake out as much of the water as you can. (Make sure you hold the cork securely - if it hits you in the face, it will hurt.)

2. Pull the sling through the bottom keepers and hang the canteen upside-down to drain out any standing water. A cotton towel jammed into the spout will help to wick the water away.

3. After an hour or so, remove the wick and let the canteen air-dry. Hanging it by an open window will help.

4. If you live in an area where there are a lot of wasps or hornets, don't hang the canteen outside the house, or you may find some unwanted guests inside of it. (They will frown very heavily upon being disturbed.)

Mark Wadsworth
07-15-2006, 06:10 PM
CARE AND CLEANING OF CANTEENS

Lets face it we all have been to a hot event before. At such of an event have you ever got a mouth full of rusty water? Itís not a pleasant thing to drink the brown water. There are ways to prevent your canteen from rusting.

You should always drain and let dry your canteens after an event. A quick rinse of hot water will help it dry faster. Then stick in a paper towel to wick dry it.

Buying a Hot tin dipped canteen. The hot tin dipped canteens have much a stronger resistance to rust. Plus it does make your canteen more authentic. But who wants to have to buy another canteen when they already have one?

Some reenactors say the coat their canteens with olive oil after each event. This will help your canteen stay rust free. But leads to greasy water.

Last, but what suggest is to cure the canteen with melted bees wax

It is strongly suggest that you to clean out the rust before being curing. To clean out the rust use a warm water and backing soda solution let soak for a few min then shake the canteen hard. Then rinse canteen with very hot water.

I take about 1 and a half tablespoons worth of bees was put it in a cup that I don't mind throwing away. I melt it in the microwave. While I am doing that I have my canteen in the oven on a low setting. The object is to heat up the canteen. Not too much that you can't hold. But hot to touch. This opens up the pours in the steel. Be careful not to let the strap touch the bottom of the oven. That could start a fire. I then I pour the hot melted bees wax in to the hot canteen. I put the cork on and roll it around for a min. Once I think I got it all, I do it for a few more seconds. I then dump the rest of the bees wax in to the trash not the sink. You will be surprised how much of it drains out. Let the canteen cool. Note the canteen will have a slight honey flavor the first time or two of using it.

It is strongly suggest that you to clean out the rust before being curing. To clean out the rust use a warm water and backing soda solution let soak for a few min then shake the canteen hard. Then rinse with very hot water.

After use drain out the canteen let set upside down

MStuart
07-16-2006, 12:30 PM
CARE AND CLEANING OF CANTEENS

I take about 1 and a half tablespoons worth of bees was put it in a cup that I don't mind throwing away.

Then dump the rest of the bees wax in to the trash not the sink.

Pay careful attention to these two items.............I have bruises yet to heal from not doing it this way. I melted my beeswax in one of my lovely brides' pots. Enough said.

On a more serious note, I beeswaxed mine about 6 years ago, do anywhere from 6-9 events per year, and haven't had one problem. It's well worth the trouble.

Mark

Rob Weaver
07-20-2006, 05:23 PM
You can heat wax, beeswax included, in a pan of water on the stove. I use a tin food can; that way I can just throw it away when I'm done. In fact, your canteen can be recoated just by melting the wax that's in it already and sloshing it around again. Prop it up between a couple bricks in a pan of water on the stove and let it heat.

Sgt. Rob Weaver
Pine River Boys
Co I 7th Wisconsin Volunteers

HighPrvt
07-20-2006, 09:51 PM
4. If you live in an area where there are a lot of wasps or hornets, don't hang the canteen outside the house, or you may find some unwanted guests inside of it. (They will frown very heavily upon being disturbed.)

OK,
Let's here the story behind #4, there's got to be one!!!

tompritchett
07-21-2006, 04:35 AM
While this is not the story you are looking for, recently one of my unit members, who is a volunteer firefighter, was called out for a swarm of bees on a bridge over I-78. Fortunately, the exterminator company had a member who was also an amatuer beekeeper. The beekeeper brought out a hivebox which already had honeycombs in them. The queen caught scent of the beeswax and readily moved her whole swarm into the box. Imagine if that had been someone's canteen instead.