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YankRI
06-22-2006, 10:32 PM
Marc Hallacker posted this essay by Jonah Begone over on the A/C. I figure it's worth posting here given its subject matter. It certainly struck a chord with me. I enlisted in the Army Reserve at the age of 37 last year and no small part of my motivation to do is expressed in the words below.

Michael Jolin
__________________

We are All Private Ryans by Jonah Begone

"Every man thinks meanly of himself for not having been a soldier." - Samuel Johnson

During a recent exchange of e-mails about political beliefs with a former reenactor, I had cause to mention and describe my service in the United States Marine Corps. It wasn’t defensive and I wasn’t bragging; I was merely responding to a suggestion that the current commander-in-chief, George W. Bush, expects that servicemen ought not to think for themselves. I responded by stating that when I was in the Marines (1974-1978 ) I was an MOS 2813, Cable Systems Repairman, who was responsible for troubleshooting and repairing damaged telephone lines. I mentioned that I attended six months of communications-electronics schooling that encouraged and required me to think for myself.

In the course of our well-mannered little debate, my correspondent privately admitted to me that he had never served in the military and that this was a matter of embarrassment for him. I then remembered the Samuel Johnson quote above.

When I was a reenactor I had occasional interesting conversations with various reenactment leaders who had never served in the real United Stated armed forces. Most of them were sheepish about the fact. One fellow – at the time a prominent East Coast leader – admitted that his service career was all of two days in a military hospital in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. I replied that at least he had an impressive locality going for him! It often seemed that the more bombastic and military the reenactment leader, the more likely it was that he never served in the real military.

When I was a junior in high school I knew that I wanted to enlist upon graduation. Which branch of the service was the question… I assumed Army, but the Air Force looked attractive. Being intrigued by the Marine recruiter during a senior “Career Day,” I signed up to listen to a presentation by the Marine recruiter. It was about that time that I read a newspaper article about some woman being threatened by a gang of some sort; I forget why this was happening. But what stood out in the article was the statement that her son, a former Marine, was standing watch over her in her home and that he owned a shotgun. A formidable obstacle indeed! It was then that I knew that in thirty years or more hence, I would want to be able to describe myself as a former Marine rather than a ex-soldier, sailor or airman. (In case you didn’t know, there is no such thing as an ex-Marine - Semper Fidelis.) So I enlisted in the Marine Corps upon graduation and served four years, getting an honorable discharge as a Sergeant (E-5). As I spent more than 180 days of consecutive service before May 1975, the government officially considers me a Vietnam Era Veteran – a flattering and somewhat embarrassing designation.

I never saw any time in Vietnam, let alone combat. The closest I ever got to Vietnam or, indeed, any Vietnamese, was in helping to tear down the telephone network put together in a Camp Pendleton refugee camp after the refugees left. My four Carter Era years in the military were much more like civilian work than truly being in the military. After all, I spent three years at the same base in California only two hours from home, working with a civilian in a civilian industry. I recall seeing a sign outside of the Base Telephone headquarters showing a big yellow Seventies happy face with the slogan, “Relax and Have a Happy Day, America – Your Marine Corps is On Duty.” I hated that thing, mainly because it seemed so emblematic of my mid-Seventies experience. And the only hostile fire I ever endured was when I once fired a .22 at an iron object on base and got a small bit of the bullet back at my leg, causing a slight scratch. I don’t even have a scar to brag about!

What’s funny to me are memories of some reenactors I still know. One fellow was one of the teenage unit “Young’uns,” and I can well recall him in my mind’s eye, running into formation late during our epochal “125th Anniversary Appomattox Confederate Surrender March” in April 1990. He has since served a long and credible service in the Marines and the Army and is a Gulf War veteran, awarded with an impressive collection of medals. These days he sends e-mails with the following quote appended at the bottom: "At ease was never that easy to me. I don't relax by parting my legs slightly and putting my hands behind my back. That does not equal ease. At ease is not being in the military. I am at ease, bro, because I am not in the military." - Mitch Hedberg. I also recall tenting with my pard Mal Stylo, a Vietnam War veteran - a real one, that is, who saw some combat in the Navy. Despite the fact that both have been in combat, modestly, neither has any pompous notions about the respect due them from service. They’ve earned that attitude as far as I’m concerned.

I also recall a story told by another reenacting friend, a man who had a truly fascinating and longtime history with reenacting with, however, no time spent in the real military. He was at his mother’s house, and she was entertaining a man who had been in combat and was telling some exceptionally gripping war-related stories. His mother then said, “Bob, tell him about some of your experiences when you did reenacting.” He hastily declined and described to me a bout of extreme embarrassment, which we both found hilarious.

So… what about my disappointed correspondent who has never been in the military? What could I say to him?

I presume you have seen Saving Private Ryan. It’s an excellent film because it’s so articulate about describing our indebtedness to the veterans who fought in World War II. (My all-time favorite war film is the superlative Band of Brothers, which I describe here.)

The message of the film is contained in a short sequence at the end of the film: Private Ryan, now an old man, is surrounded by his wife, children and grandchildren and is looking at the headstone of Captain Miller (Tom Hanks). Recalling the sacrifices on his behalf more than fifty years ago, he tearfully tells his wife, "Tell me I have led a good life." His wife is puzzled by this and asks, “What?” Ryan again says, “Tell me I’m a good man.” His wife replies, with finality, “You are.” I have never seen such a profound and moving concept expressed so simply.

That’s the important matter regarding military service. Not whether you have served, what you did, with whom, or whether or not you have been in combat. The important thing is, what sort of a person have you been? Has your life justified the sacrifice of blood by the combat veterans? Do you dishonor them with your precious life with all of its squandered freedoms and opportunities? Or have you lived your life in such a way as to bring credit to the nation they fought for, your family they have defended and yourself? We are all Privates Ryan, you see, even the warriors of today, who I’m sure would be the first to admit it. Each generation is deeply in debt to the previous generations.

I was first made aware of this notion by another reenactor – a Vietnam veteran - who asked in a newsletter article I was editing how the self-indulgent and self-destroying entertainment celebrities of today were honoring men who had given their lives for them. At the time I thought he was misplaced or a little over the top in his sentiment, but with the passing of the years I have come to agree with his argument.

We are indeed all Privates Ryan. This idea is expressed very well by a fellow Marine:

It is the soldier, not the reporter, who has given us freedom of the press.
It is the soldier, not the poet, who has given us freedom of speech.
It is the soldier, not the campus organizer, who has given us the freedom to demonstrate.
It is the soldier, who salutes the flag, who serves beneath the flag, and whose coffin is draped by the flag, who allows the protester to burn the flag.
- Father Dennis Edward O'Brien, USMC*

________________
*From the "For What It's Worth Dept.": There is some question of the true authorship of this poem. Most attribute it to Father Dennis Edward O'Brien, Sergeant, USMC, a Guadalcanal Veteran of World War II, 11th Marines, as Mr. Begone does here. However, some attribute it to General of the Armies Douglas MacArthur from a Veterans' Day speech he gave (year unknown).
- Mike Jolin

indguard
06-22-2006, 10:50 PM
Interesting post.

But, what idiot said this...?

... the current commander-in-chief, George W. Bush, expects that servicemen ought not to think for themselves

And I agree with you that past service or no is not really the point of being an American. Beign worthy of those who served is.

tompritchett
06-22-2006, 11:45 PM
Interesting post.

But, what idiot said this...?


... the current commander-in-chief, George W. Bush, expects that servicemen ought not to think for themselves

I can think of several two star generals and one three star general who commanded troops in Iraq that have publically raised similar questions sbout this current administration.

indguard
06-23-2006, 12:14 AM
.... and were they appointees of the previous administration?

So far, most of the detractor generals have been Clinton's Pals!

Rusty
06-23-2006, 07:45 AM
At forty years of age, being involved in Civil War and WWII reenacting for about 10 years, having such an interest in military history and having such a deep respect for those that have served in any branch, peacetime or wartime, I have but one regret. I never served and I am the first to say it. I personally believe that a stint in the service can do every young person some good and a part of me does feel hardened since I ever did spend time as a soldier. Good post.

indguard
06-23-2006, 06:16 PM
I do not regret not going into the military when I would have done it.

My military would have been Jimmy Carter's military and there couldn't have been a WORSE era to be in the US military in modern times.

I almost went in. Took the Marine's placement tests and scored very high. But, in the end, I decided it was not the best thing to do and went to college instead. If I was younger or older, I am sure I would have served as has most of my family (including my son on his way to Iraq as we speak) but the times were just not right for "my day".

But, I do not look sideways at anyone who did or did not serve. We created this Republic on civilian control, not military. And, past service does not equate to automatic correctness on things, either. Past service should be honored, but not cannonized. Remember, we have had some nefarious people who were in the military, but many more who were honerable men, but wrong on certain issues.

jda3rd
06-23-2006, 08:58 PM
All during my youth, I planned on joining the military. I had no other career in mind right through high school and into my first year of college. However, because of a childhood accident that left me with only one eye, I was flatly refused the opportunity to serve. Although I have relatives who were fairly highly ranked career officers, who tried to obtain wavers, I was not even able to enroll in advanced ROTC classes.
In addition, I was not considered physically fit for any uniform service in government, even NPS, local police, or fire dept. It boiled down to an unwillingness on the part of gov't to risk the loss of my only eye while on the job. My otherwise good physical condition was not a factor. Academics were not a factor. Talents or abilities or interests were not a factor. Only the fact that I have only one eye. I'm considered a high risk of injury. Heck, I can't even obtain a commercial driver's license.
Was I disappointed at not being able to serve? ******************** right. Am I still disappointed? Yep.
Is re-enacting a way to compensate for not being in the military? I've had 25 years to think about that question. I like to think it was not.
I knew at the beginning that "military" re-enacting has absolutley nothing to do with real-world military or naval service, and I never tried to pass myself off as anything but a Civil War re-enactor, which, when accompanied with some loose change, might get you a cup of coffee. Re-enacting, no matter how authentic, no matter how immersed you may be, despite the fact that we have the rare opportunity to mess around with cannons, horses, and harness, and occasionaly live shoot a field-piece, reenacting isn't even as real as Cub Scouts. Re-enactors are only due the respect and credit that attains from their real world lives and careers, and how they treat those around them. Re-enacting officers are only officers in make-believe, and any show of respect or military courtesy is role-playing. I may salute an "officer" in blue or grey because they are wearing the trappings of their "rank", not because they hold any authority. I know it ain't real, and I don't go much for the "willful suspension of dis-belief." But I love it. It's just so much fun, and for the most part the people involved are great.

I never miss an opportunity to thank veterans for their service.Do I feel I deserve any respect for my "service" as a "re-enactor"? Not one bit and I don't envy the respect due veterans. It's a hobby, due no more respect from anyone than hunting or fishing (but deserving of a good bit more respect than sports (amateur or pro) that invovle skill with balls).

MDConfederate
06-23-2006, 10:00 PM
I've always been interested in the military and often wonder what it would have been like for me if I had joined the military. I guess it just wasn't my destiny to serve in the military. My education did not gear me for military service. I attended a Quaker High School which really made me consider other ways of serving my country. I went to college and majored in history, but the school did not have an ROTC program. During my junior year I considered the military. I went to a recruiter in 1992, took the ASVAB and had my physical. I did very well and was in great shape at the time, but the Army recruiter was just horribly incompetent. He forgot to arrange transportation for me to come home after the ASVAB and again after my physical. Both times, I had to catch a ride with the Navy. Looking back, I should have joined the Navy. I just wasn't impressed and the Army did not really need many new recruits in 1992 like they do now.

At the same time that I was considering the military I was dating a very attractive and intelligent woman. I thought about the National Guard but decide to join a reenacting group instead. Leaving my girl friend for real basic training just wasn't a very logical decision. I would have been stupid to let her go, so I decided to look into law enforcement. With the State of Maryland in recession and large budget cuts going on it was tough to find a job in that area, so I decided to stay in school an extra year to become a public school teacher. By 1995 I had a job at a local high school and in 1997 I married that same attractive and intelligent woman that I had been dating since 1991. I saw teaching as my patriotic duty and service to my country. I did the best I could and was proud of my work for 8 years. Now I stay home with my two, soon to be three kids and help my wife with her career. My hope is that I'm a good person, that my marriage remains stable and happy, that my kids learn what it means to be a good American, and eventually it would be nice to return to some form of teaching. I volunteer for local things when I can and try to be a good citizen.

I'll always wonder what it would have been like had I joined the Army. My fantasy was to be a tank commander. I think I could have been good, but that was not the road I chose. If I had joined the military I would not have my wonderful wife and my children. I'm glad that I never had to serve, but I respect all that do. It is not an easy decision and for many it is not a choice. Reenacting has taught me that I would not wish real war on anyone. I really enjoyed this post, and many times I feel like a Private Ryan. I hope I am living a good life as it is an honor to live in the United States.

John Wyman
Chesapeake Volunteer Guard

sbl
06-24-2006, 06:19 AM
It is the soldier, not the reporter, who has given us freedom of the press.
It is the soldier, not the poet, who has given us freedom of speech.
It is the soldier, not the campus organizer, who has given us the freedom to demonstrate.
It is the soldier, who salutes the flag, who serves beneath the flag, and whose coffin is draped by the flag, who allows the protester to burn the flag.
- Father Dennis Edward O'Brien, USMC*

I thought Zell Miller said that or it's a quote from Starship Troopers (the book)
Sounds good at 1st reading but the professions noted have served as soldiers. Most Soldiers don't exist as soldiers all their lives.

sbl
06-24-2006, 06:24 AM
"Every man thinks meanly of himself for not having been a soldier." - Samuel Johnson

I wonder if Johnson was joking about non-veterans who try to suck up to veterans in their presence?

reb64
06-24-2006, 02:47 PM
[QUOTE=YankRI]Marc Hallacker posted this essay by Jonah Begone over on the A/C. I figure it's worth posting here given its subject matter. It certainly struck a chord with me. I enlisted in the Army Reserve at the age of 37 last year and no small part of my motivation to do is expressed in the words below.

Michael Jolin
__________________

We are All Private Ryans by Jonah Begone

responding to a suggestion that the current commander-in-chief, George W. Bush, expects that servicemen ought not to think for themselves. I

MStuart
06-24-2006, 04:00 PM
So you get what you pay for on this one. The reasons for serving are as many and diverse as those for not doing it. Each to his own. That being said, I was a USAF recruiter from 1978-82. During that period, depending on where you were located as a recruiter, the pickin's could have been mighty slim, or pretty good. I had the opportunity to speak with young folks of all races, backgrounds, social status....you name it, and a majority of the time with their parents. I had the honor of starting more than a few folks in their journey of service, and, looking back, it was a pretty rewarding experience. Military service isn't for everyone, I was quick to learn back then. The regimentation, percieved loss of personal freedoms, low pay, and danger of the profession were very real concerns of both applicants and parents and I'll take a chance and say they still are, especially nowadays.

A couple of things rankled me during that time, and still do. And that's the perception by some citizens in our great nation that military service is the last chance for some guys and girls that can't get a job "on the outside". Or, "the military is the only hope for this guy, he's a loser". My personal favorite that I still remember to this day was the statement by one parent of an upper-middle class student that the military was "just not an option" for their child. I asked what that meant and she told me that the military just wasn't for their "kind of people".

It was a sign of the times, I guess, being after the Vietanese war and all that went with it. But I still cringe when folks see military service as a last resort or something less than any other profession. Even back then, the technology was developing a great rates, and one had to have more then a little brains to succeed. Even more so now, no matter what your MOS, AFSC, or Rate is.

I have a special place in my heart and respect for those that have taken the plunge and served in the armed forces. Not everyone has done it, and those that have are, at least, somewhat of a "band of brothers" who have served in the U.S. military. It's they who have, and are now, fighting our country's battles. Peace time being no different than war time, it's still the same service to the nation. As I said in the beginning of this long-winded rant, I don't look down or have any less resepct for those that haven't served, unless that person happens to be one of those that see's service as something less than professional and honorable (like the lady in paragraph 2)

On the reenactor issue, I don't think it makes a whole lot of difference if you've had service or not. After all, we're "playing army" for the most part. Though, I'll go out on a limb and say that those who have had active service have somewhat of a leg up on those that don't. They know the "in's and outs" of military life and the mind-set of soldiers having experienced it first-hand. I'll bet that the everyday U.S. soldier and his attitudes haven't changed all that much since 1776. As they say "a bitchin' soldier is a happy soldier".........The "experience" doesn't make them any better of a reenactor, or worse, but they've got an experience of actually have done (although in a modern setting) what they're reenacting.

Mark

indguard
06-24-2006, 04:32 PM
A couple of things rankled me during that time, and still do. And that's the perception by some citizens in our great nation that military service is the last chance for some guys and girls that can't get a job "on the outside".

HEAR, HEAR!!!

tompritchett
06-24-2006, 09:51 PM
On the reenactor issue, I don't think it makes a whole lot of difference if you've had service or not. After all, we're "playing army" for the most part. Though, I'll go out on a limb and say that those who have had active service have somewhat of a leg up on those that don't. They know the "in's and outs" of military life and the mind-set of soldiers having experienced it first-hand. I'll bet that the everyday U.S. soldier and his attitudes haven't changed all that much since 1776. As they say "a bitchin' soldier is a happy soldier".........The "experience" doesn't make them any better of a reenactor, or worse, but they've got an experience of actually have done (although in a modern setting) what they're reenacting.

I am assuming that you are talking about the poll in this paragraph. The purpose of the poll was to determine whether or not prior military service affected whether or not the veteran tended more towards one side of the hobby or the other. Numerous times I have heard prior military mainstreamers mention that they really saw no need to always campaign to understand the lot of the common civil war soldier because the veteran had already experienced similar hardships during their tours and did not see the need to repeat the experiences in their entirety. I not saying that I agree or disagree with this sentiment but was curious to see if it indeed was an operative factor in the hobby.

MStuart
06-24-2006, 10:43 PM
Tom:

Actually, the poll never entered into it. Just an observation on my part.

Mark

tompritchett
06-25-2006, 12:28 AM
No problem. Wasn't sure. Have a good season reenacting.

madisontigers
06-29-2006, 11:55 AM
I've always held our veterans in high regard. However, let's remember that the army of the 19th century differed from the military of today. Let's not also forget about law enforcement officers, and other first responder jobs. These guys face danger on a daily basis. They are also usually working under a military style supervision.


David Long

tompritchett
06-29-2006, 12:05 PM
Let's not also forget about law enforcement officers, and other first responder jobs.

Definitely. One of my closest freinds, who is also a member of my unit and ex-military, is a volunteer fire-fighter. I respect all of them.

Shortround
07-07-2006, 10:57 AM
I can think of several two star generals and one three star general who commanded troops in Iraq that have publically raised similar questions sbout this current administration.

Yep, with the exception of religious hatred in the Middle East there are few things as fun as politics in America.

One side can say Cheney avoided military service. The other side can post Bill Clinton's letter to ROTC "I loathe the military" to the web.

One side can say Bush isn't doing Iraq correctly. The real terrorist threat is in Iran. The other side can show that Bill Clinton's White House staff denied the use of Armor in Somalia. That result was about 20 dead Americans and it led to an old American military ruse, cut and run.

Cindy Sheehan can call Bush a coward for not meeting her in 2005. No mention is made of the father of the dead medal-of-honor winning soldier in "Blackhawk Down" who called Clinton a draft dodger and was nearly arrested by the Secret Service. There was really no web and thus no story in 1994. Such is life.

I'm not here to point fingers. There is lots of blame to go around.

My old Guard infantry unit came back from Iraq with 4 dead and about a dozen injured, it was the 1st of the 125th Infantry out of Michigan. Since 1945 the only combat they saw was in the '67 Detroit riots. That has changed.

My son is in BCT and his unit, A Battery of the 1st of the 119th out of Michigan, may get mobilized for Iraq or Afghanistan in either 2007 or '08. The 1st of the 119th got off mobilization in 2005.

I'm still cooling my heels and waiting for the (possible) recall orders. I was asked to join the new MTTs that are assigned to Iraqi army units. It's amazing how upset the wife will get when you're stupid enough to volunteer for service.

But, I'm just waiting and nothing more. The hardest thing I had to do was go on a diet and start running for PT again.

Yep, I voted for Bush. So, that's why I sent in my paperwork to St. Louis. A man should be adult enough to clean up their mess.

Some generals don't like Bush. That's nothing new. Some really good General called McClelland didn't like Lincoln. He wanted to do an American military trick called "Cut and Run" in the American Civil War. Was McClelland right? Well, it would have saved on the dead. The slaves would not have liked it but their lot really didn't inprove until the civil rights era of the '50s and '60s. Perhaps McClelland was right in the long run.

But what do I know? All the people in our military volunteered. Most of the people in the Civil War volunteered.

Yep, you can write that you dislike the president. You served and earned it. Even if you didn't serve it's your right.

We will have the right to call the president any name we want until Hillary come to power in '08 ;).

Enjoy the second half of the reenacting summer.

georgia
07-08-2006, 11:11 PM
i am currently in high school and wanting to join the army. i come from a small town and me and my freinds are going to enlist with each other. we have known each other all of are lives and cant wait to join. just about everyone in my family has served but my father. my mother doesnt like the idea but i believe its the right thing to do. reenacting is a great hobby. when i first started it was because i love history and anything to do with military. i have always wanted to join but didnt know what service. the marines looked interesting but something just drove me to the army. i love reenacting and belive that the only way i am able to enjoy this hobby is because of our ancesters and the men and women serving right now fighting for my rights and everybody elses.

tompritchett
07-08-2006, 11:44 PM
Understand where you are coming from. Even though I personally opposed the war in Vietnam and thought Nixon was one of the worst abusers of presidental power ever, I still joined ROTC before it was clear that Nixon was going to find his "peace with honor" and before I had received any draft lottery number. From the very beginning I was planning on a combat arms branch, even though that would have almost guaranteed a tour in Nam had the war still been going when I would have received my commission.

LParsons
07-16-2006, 06:14 PM
I can say the military was/is a last option for me, im am pursuing a career in education, why? because i believe that eduvators are the source that can solve many problems in the country, i just dont think the military is the right option for a lot of people, just like college is not. (dont get me started on education funding either.......) :-)
The thing that get me mad more than when other people i know dont respect veterans is when they are ignorant about what they did. For example i know someone that seriously didnt believe me when i said the Soviet Union, Canada, and the UK were in WW2, and it wasnt just "the US kicked Germany's ass" as he said.

peace
LP

LParsons
07-16-2006, 07:08 PM
excuse the grammar/typos, i type rather quickly, and i have the problem of not proofreading carefully (or at all):oops:

I just meant to say i think education is the most vital service a government provides, it is the catalyst for everything else.

Frenchie
07-16-2006, 08:35 PM
There's no time like the present to start improving your spelling and grammar skills. It will pay big dividends, and the sooner you get started, the better.

I think the most important service a government provides is national defense, followed by international relations (i.e., treaties) and providing a reasonable level of control over interstate commerce. These are, in fact, exactly what the Constitution requires the Federal government to do - and nothing else. Education, for instance, is a State-level function and the Federal government has no business interfering with it.

Shortround
07-17-2006, 12:34 PM
To the moderator,

Ok, you don't like Nixon in 'Nam. I was trying to keep the thing on an even keel. However, you make no mention of LBJ and that little incident with a few NVN torpedo boats and a couple American destroyers. When you have a president brag "They can't bomb an outhouse with out my approval" then you know the commander's initiative in the field is pretty much gone. LBJ blew that war and Nixon took the blame. I highly encourage the typical reenactor to read "Devil's Guard". Terrorism can be defeated. The rub is you have to act like the Waffen SS to win.

To the future school teacher:

American spend more aggregate money on education than defense. It's not even close. Defense only gets about 3% GPD. Aggregate education is much more than than that number. Indeed, all of America spends almost as much on pet food and supplies than defense. The B-52 bombers are about 50 years old. The USS Enterprise, a carrier, is well over 40 years old. The average M-1 tank is over 12 years old. My kids local high school is less than five years old and cost over $70 million dollars. That is one high school.

Anyway, I was a computer programmer for the state of Ohio. One job was to reconcile the number of open teacher positions against the number of graduates from the colleges. Guess what? There are some open positions in the sciences. However, we figured Ohio could shut down the teachers colleges for four years before there would be a real shortage of licensed teachers. There is a staggering surplus of History and Grammar teachers. Indeed, for some reason 20% of all new teachers quit in five years. Our guess is getting lip from "Dewaine" and the homies was the bottom line of the problem of the quitting the profession.

Anyway, that report was quickly buried.

The dead fact of life is the modern teaching profession is a guild and a monopoly. A teacher has to be an NEA (or allied union) to be hired at a school. If you think a union monopoly of a labor supply is good for a business then I encourage you to look at Ford, General Motors, Chrysler, and AMC. Oh, that's right! AMC is gone and GM has near junk bond status.

And this poster worked as a teacher for the intercity Columbus, Ohio schools. Columbus is like Detroit which is like Chicago which is like... well you get the idea.

Good luck, kid. You'll need it. Just take this bit of advise, get a minor degree you can use, like welding.

I will return to teaching in a few years. However, it will be in the Lutheran school system where if a kid tells you to **** off the parents will not say "he was exercising his free speech rights!" BTW, Catholic and Lutheran schools crush most public schools in testing. Caring Parents and Teachers make good students, not endless government spending.


What has any of this to do with reenacting? Not a thing.

Indyguy
07-17-2006, 01:55 PM
OOH RAH, Semper Fi

Cpl. W.P. Snyder
1st Marine Div. 1st ANGLICO
Camp Pendleton,Ca.
1986-1992

Darn Outstanding Marine Just Darn Outstanding!

Sgt_Pepper
07-17-2006, 09:33 PM
This thread is now closed.

I will not delete or edit Mr. Hensler's post, but I wish to make it clear that in the future I prefer he restrain himself from making statements that could be taken (and most certainly will be taken by some) to be racist in tone. Further, my own personal experience tells me that teachers are as likely as not to get "back talk" from students who aren't named "Dewaine" and don't really fit the appellation of "homie". Disrespect and disobedience from students is far more a function of parental influence than race or socio-economic status.