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cwmed
04-02-2008, 10:34 PM
Dear Friends,

I recently purchased a US medical pannier. It is in beautiful condition and is mostly complete. I have posted the photos on the web cause of the number if you have any questions feel free to ask. Also if you have any info at all on it I would like it.

Luke Castleberry

http://s291.photobucket.com/albums/ll281/cwmed/?start=20

funhistory
04-03-2008, 03:30 PM
Hello Luke,

Based upon the photos that you've shared, it's difficult to tell whether you've purchased a pannier or simply a collection of medical items. I'll defer to our colleagues for additional information on the objects that they recognize. What you may have purchased is an individual's collection of medical items that were not part of a set. Lists of what a complete pannier should contain can be found in several locations, and I'll defer to Noah to provide links to them if he'd be so kind.

While I'm not expert in the subject, I recognize many of the items as post Civil War. For example, the Allaire & Woodward package contains botanicals that were put up by a company of that name in Peoria, Illinois. As a native of that city, I believe that the company was active from the mid-1870s onward, and I was responsible for processing a collection of identical product packages presented by the Woodward family to the local historical society. I believe that the donors claimed a date from the late 1880s. The glass hypodermic syringe might be accurate, but the case that contains it appears to be late.

The small case containing individual phials, was popular in the 19th century with those who practiced homeopathy, which called for the use of botanicals and natural remedies for the treatment of disease. I believe that the quantities contained in the individual phials would have been in too small a quantity to be used to treat a sufficient number of patients in the field.

Based upon my research and material that I've received from the collection at Bristol-Meyers Squibb regarding Dr. Squibb's medical pannier, the items that you show, while nice medical objects, wouldn't have been found in the Squibb pannier. having examined a Squibb pannier, the quantities of medicines were in far larger quantities. I don't believe that it contained a suppository mold or a pill tile. Perhaps other pannier makers included these items, and I will certainly stand corrected. Also present should be a graduated measuring glass, glass irrigating syringes, tin bottles for those chemicals such as Aether and Chloroform that would be sensitive to the light and couldn't be placed in glass bottles.

I'm not sure of the significance of the traveler's guide to DC as it relates to the collection. I was also disappointed to see that the last two digits on the London document are missing.

I will be anxious to learn what the others might be able to share and contribute to the discussion and identification.

cwmed
04-03-2008, 05:45 PM
Dear Sir,

Thank you for your coments but if you go to the first page you can see th 14 tins that came in it as well as the box itself and the interior label. The books and other things came in it as well as Day spints and a real bone foot. As for info I need mainly records or accounts of the use. I already have alot of generic info on it. Anyway it is a Pannier it just wants to start you on page 2 of the photos insted of page 1. Sorry about that.

Thanks,

Luke Castleberry

Jas. Cox
04-03-2008, 07:40 PM
I don't know what all you have, but it's a cool looking collection.

hta1970
04-03-2008, 11:15 PM
Luke,

Any chance of getting measurements of the tins and labels especially the white sugar tin?

Were there any labels on the tins other than quinine pills and white sugar?

Thanks!

funhistory
04-04-2008, 11:31 AM
Hello Luke,

Thanks for the clarification; I stand corrected. While the label on the inside of the lid appears to identify it as a Squibb pannier, I will stand by my original statement that many of the items don't appear to be original to the pannier or to the period even though they may have come with it.

While the tins are wonderful and probably are the original components, many other items appear to have been added, which is reflected by the variations in the paper labels and the types of tins (some square, some round, etc). The label on the inside of the box lid provides a detailed list of what should be contained in the pannier as a sort of checklist for the surgeon, and it should be your guide to indicate whether the pannier is complete. You should also have a removable wooden tray. There appears to be too few glass bottles. According to Squibb, they should have glass stoppers, and they should also be of a consistent size.

It is an interesting collection as Jim commented, and it bears further examination.

cwmed
04-04-2008, 06:52 PM
Dear Sir,

I am sorry about coming off in the manner of correcting you. The photos were in reverse order. It does have a lift out shelf and underneth is what held the books splints and foot which I will upload sometime soon. As for the measurements I will try however the label on the tin does not read sugar it is a latin label but it may still be. Ill try to get the measurements for you ASAP.

Luke Castleberry

cwmed
04-04-2008, 06:55 PM
Also is the large round tin round tin a Chloraphorm tin??

Thanks,

Luke Castleberry

hanktrent
04-04-2008, 08:21 PM
As for the measurements I will try however the label on the tin does not read sugar it is a latin label but it may still be. Ill try to get the measurements for you ASAP.

Are you-all talking about the tin labelled "---charum album"? Can't imagine what that would be other than white sugar.

By the way, here's a slightly later edition online, of the book whose title page is pictured: http://books.google.com/books?printsec=frontcover&dq=inauthor:edward+inauthor:foote+intitle:%22commo n+sense%22&lr=&id=AfsebE9PRd4C&as_brr=0&output=html I notice the author bills himself as a "Medical and electrical therapeutist at Saratoga Springs." That should make for some... interesting... reading. *cough*hydropathic quack*cough* :)

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

hta1970
04-04-2008, 10:15 PM
Luke,

If you look at the tin, it has the number 15 printed upon it.

#15 in the Squibb Pannier was WHITE SUGAR. Ten ounces.

Saccharum Album is latin for white sugar.

"Doc" Nelson
04-05-2008, 12:56 AM
Luke, I have to say . . very nice find!!!
:mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

funhistory
04-05-2008, 02:10 PM
Dear Friends,

I recently purchased a US medical pannier. It is in beautiful condition and is mostly complete. I have posted the photos on the web cause of the number if you have any questions feel free to ask. Also if you have any info at all on it I would like it.

Luke Castleberry

http://s291.photobucket.com/albums/ll281/cwmed/?start=20

Hello Luke,

No offense taken, and I humbly ask that you not misinterpret my comment as pouring cold water on your find. It is important and exciting, and I believe that we in the field have an opportunity to learn from it.

However, in your initial post as quoted above, I was trying to caution you and others that the pannier that you have isn't "mostly complete" and that many of the items that you've kindly photographed are neither original to the pannier or to the period. As I indicated in another message, the label on the inside of the lid will provide you with a list of the contents of the pannier. Because the medicines were produced and packaged by one company and sold as a "kit" or "set", the interior containers would be labeled by the producer, which was "Edward R. Squibb, MD, Brooklyn, NY".

During his service as a US Naval surgeon, Edward Robinson Squibb became alarmed by the inconsistent quality of medicines that were being sold in the US and prescribed by physicians, and as a result, he resigned his commission to create a chemical laboratory in the later 1850s. At his laboratory, he developed medicines of consistent quality and composition. Throughout his career, Squibb fought for quality, and his products were reknowned because they were consistent from batch to batch so that the efficacy of the product would be uniform. He was most known for the purity of his aether and cholorform, and he led the charge for what became the Pure Food and Drug Act after his death. During the War Squibb's laboratory served as a contractor to the US Army, and he assembled, packaged, and sold the pannier for $111 each. When full, the pannier weighed 88 pounds, and it was designed to be carried by a pack mule or in a medical wagon. It was from the pannier that the surgeon's medical haversack was replenished for use in the field.

I'll look forward to the additional photos that you've promised to post, and if you'd like, I'd be happy to try to identify what is "period" and what is not. I will await your assent.

cwmed
04-06-2008, 09:22 AM
Dear Sir,

I dont believe that you were putting anything down Im just glad that you knew what some of it was and you knowledge on the subject is great. Thanks alot for the last bit of info. As for the label, I am only 17 so my latin is a bit rusty but Ill get some better photos of it ASAP. As for the tin itself what is it is has a screw top? Also what about the big round one?

Thanks,

Luke Castleberry

funhistory
04-06-2008, 07:00 PM
Hello Luke,

I'm not certain which tin you're trying to identify because I can tell scale in the individual photos; however, from those with labels that I've looked at, it appears that there are several images of a tin or tins that held quinine pills "Pilulae Quinae". I'm not sure what would have been in the round tins because I believe that weren't standard to Squibb's production.

If you want to shoot more photos and send them to my e-mail address, I believe that I can identify them for you. The other poster was correct in that one of the tins held white sugar. I believe that it is marked "15".