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NoahBriggs
02-06-2008, 08:42 AM
It looks like several people are interested in how to set up the paperwork for a field hospital. I'll tell you - I made an educated SWAG, based on the US Army Regs, the Steward's Manual, a couple of original patient registers from Confederate general hospitals, and my own method for keeping track of the data. My goal was to create a simple, easily-modified-to-your-style method which was convenient and portable to have with you at living histories. It's been field tested at Paynes Farm and the Wilderness LH a year or so back.

Disclaimer - You Southern boys are SOL. I have no idea how to do it Confederate style. My educated guess would be that the Confederate Medical Department did not feel like wasting resources reinventing the wheel, and simply adapted their methods from the US Army.

The Revised Regs suggest the regimental hospital keep their data in ledgers, as books are easier to transport than reams of paper. Copies were to be made out on a regular basis on patients, supplies expended and received, orders, and the myriad inventory forms you may see, usually on a monthly or quarterly basis. The ultimate goalwas to crunch numbers so the Surgeon-General could make a daily report to Mr. Lincoln on the number of troops available for service.

Somehow this dead-tree mayhem was supposed to fit into the non-standardized Army departmental paperwork, and blended together in a number-crunching stew. Schaffner observed the majority of the supply and accounting and inventory forms were designed for a hospital on an isolated frontier post, where it would have to do a lot of haggling with the local populace for food and fuel and the like. Thus a lot of the forms in the Regs are irrelevant to a direct field hospital application.

Before we get into the nitty-gritty I suggest tiptoeing to the AC Forum and looking up Michael Schaffner's latest iteration of "School of the Clerk" so you may orient yourself to further instruction on this thread. It covers writing supplies, attitudes, and a glimpse into a bureaucracy unthinkable in our time, yet necessary to have in the back of our mind to understand the general context.

I'll post pictures of what I have done when I can. I'm posting from work, so access to research materials is not happening right now.

fred franze
02-06-2008, 09:13 AM
To all who post on this topic you have my thanks for all the good information you provide. Special thanks to Noah, you are a wealth of information. To date I have been just a lurker here but visit often and learn a lot from all of you. I do a medical impression at Fort Delaware on Pea Patch Island in the Delaware river, the only CW site in the state of Delaware. I portray a Union Army/contract doctor by the name of Washington Nugent whose character I have carefully researched through his great granddaughter. Hopefully I will have available to me this season his original surgical set to display to the public as well as other original items that belonged to Dr. Nugent. My impression is for the most part medicine as opposed to surgery. I like to talk about and display the different medicines and compounds used during the 19th century and will not display anything that I cannot talk intellegently about.

My intention this season at the fort (April-September) is to present these things from the perspective of Dr. Nugent. The man is a facinating study and I wish I could have known him.

Fort Delaware was a prison camp for Confederate prisioners. It had a 600 bed hospital and a medical department that consisted of Union and Confederate medical personnel, surgeons and hospital stewards and contract surgeons. These folks provided medical care for all on the island, prisoners, garrison troops, union army prisoners (deserters and such) and the many civilians who lived on the island. I could tell you much more about the place but I have been too long winded as is. BTW, I am a reenactor in the 18th Virginia Infantry Regiment with the rank of Captain (asst. surgeon) quite a mix would you say.

NoahBriggs
02-06-2008, 09:46 AM
Mr. Franze, congratulations. I have heard a lot of "no sh*t, there I was" stories about things that happened at the fort on the island - civilian stuff, and military mayhem. You give me yet one more excuse to go out there at some point in the near future. If I recall it's also the location of the Don Hubbard School of Music Instruction. Don was a good medical reenactor as well.

We posted a biblio a ways back which included a link to Beasley's 2900 Prescriptions and Edward Parrish's Introduction to Practical Pharmacy. Both of those are good starting points for learning medicines, writing prescriptions and other routine pharmaceutical work. Civil War Pharmacy by Michael Flannery can be read concurrently as a sort of "Cliff's Notes".

hanktrent
02-06-2008, 10:46 AM
I do a medical impression at Fort Delaware on Pea Patch Island in the Delaware river, the only CW site in the state of Delaware.

Sorta off topic, but not really for medical paperwork, do you know if any medical records from Fort Delaware survive, concerning medical treatment of prisoners from mid June to mid August 1864? I'm looking for information on George B. Fitzgerald (alias J.B. Fitzgerald) who may have been a frequent visitor to the surgeon then.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

fred franze
02-06-2008, 01:54 PM
Hank,
medical records for Fort Delaware do still exist and one of these days soon I'm going to take the time to research them. They are kept in a repository and not readily accessable to the general public. Not sure of the time frame or the name but its worth a look. When I find more information I'll post it. At this time I'm dealing with the State Parks Historian and intend to pick his brain about many things.

fred franze
02-06-2008, 02:08 PM
Noah,
You are Correct about the Don Hubard school of music. They still conduct it annually, devote an entire weekend to it. Don is sorely missed by the folks at the fort and parks system. Had the pleasure of meeting him once at the fort.

Any time you would like to tour the fort feel welcome. They have done wonders with it in the last few years as funding would permit. Some of the rooms in the fort have been restored to what the original was like, right down to the paint colors, carpet patterns, etc. They have built a reproduction of one segment of the prisoners barrack from the original plans, the only one of it's kind in the country, or so they say. There are two operational period correct kitchens (officer & enlisted), an enlisted mess hall, a working laundry, an ordinance room, issue room, all period correct and stocked and even a small room called the "infirmary" where I hang my hat. Think I'll recommend that they change the name to dispensary. That way I can set it up to look like one.

If you are serious about visiting the fort then grarison weekend would be a good bet, lot of activity then. Just check the web site for dates.
Fred Franze

hanktrent
02-06-2008, 04:06 PM
Hank,
medical records for Fort Delaware do still exist and one of these days soon I'm going to take the time to research them.

That's good to know they still exist. If you or anyone in that neck of the woods has a chance to look at them I'd appreciate any information on that particular prisoner. I'm in Ohio, so it's not like I can hop over there in a few hours to check no them myself. No hurry, but I'd definitely be interested in any records about him.

Now back to our regularly scheduled program. :)

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

NoahBriggs
02-07-2008, 03:24 PM
Update:

I have written a rough draft of my paperwork article. It starts with the three ledgers I created, and from there I'll explore things like surgeons call, recruit exams, and some other advanced paperwork as time and research allow it.

I am up to my eyeballs in Winter of 64 prep - creating little envelopes and paper folders for dispensing medications, preparing surgeon's morning report forms, preparing prescriptions, preparing medicines to be used, and prepping Hank Trent and a couple of other volunteers as my patients for four days. I need to write a couple of letters, too. It's been promised that it will be a busy four days, and the organizers are not kidding. Charles Heath remarked to me that he wished he had five years to prepare for W64 instead of two. I know how he feels.

I'm also creating a few extra Skinny Annes Finest Kind products (http://www.authentic-campaigner.com/forum/blog.php?u=3023)on the chance I might make a sale. If you are interested please contact me at bluemasscat at yahoo.com, with "SAFK" in the subject line so you don't get deleted as spam.

Jas. Cox
02-07-2008, 04:03 PM
Update:

.... I am up to my eyeballs in Winter of 64 prep - creating little envelopes and paper folders for dispensing medications, preparing surgeon's morning report forms, preparing prescriptions, preparing medicines to be used, and prepping Hank Trent and a couple of other volunteers as my patients for four days. I need to write a couple of letters, too. It's been promised that it will be a busy four days, and the organizers are not kidding. Charles Heath remarked to me that he wished he had five years to prepare for W64 instead of two. I know how he feels.....

If there is a way you think I can help you create these things, let me know and I will give it a try.

NoahBriggs
02-07-2008, 09:14 PM
If there is a way you think I can help you create these things, let me know and I will give it a try.

Thanks! The majority of it I am going to scan and have onhand should anyone ask anyway. I have a pattern made up for the little envelopes that allow one to make four at a time with scissors and glue.

Jas. Cox
02-07-2008, 09:37 PM
You have my offer.

TJ6
02-24-2008, 11:21 AM
Hello. I am a new member although not new to the forum. I have been following this thread and variations on it since at least last summer. I suspect my story is much the same as others--I've been drawn out of lurking with questions no one else has asked. Hopefully that doesn't mean the answers are obvious. I've been developing a CSA steward impression for approximately a year and have learned a great deal from this forum. I have a number of questions, many having to do with paperwork, some having to do with meds. If I may, I will post several of each in this message rather than going to several different threads. If I may not, you will let me know and I will go to the other threads. First, paperwork questions, since that is this thread:

1. Noah, I would really like to see your article and scans of your ledgers. In a previous post, you mentioned that you got your books at Office Depot. Are you using the ones that are blue and maroon (I think) with the title in gilt on the front? What is the design of the labels you are pasting on the front?

2. On the monthly report, there appear to be several forms to be submitted. In looking at copies of some original documents, it appears that all of these were of 1 piece and were folded accordion-style from top to bottom and then tri-folded the other direction much like a modern map, so that it was a neat packet with a front that gives the month, says "Report of Sick and Wounded" and has an area to list the companies being reported. I am basing my assumption on the apparent creases in the forms. Is anyone familiar with this method of completing and submitting a monthly report? Any idea how to get it printed in large enough format that the print is legible? Could this have been done on the 16 x 21" double-size paper?

3. What is the difference in use of form 11, the Register, and form 15, Morning report? The title of the latter includes "for a regiment, post, or garrison." Perhaps form 15 was not used in the field?

4. Is there a particular form for reporting casualties after a battle?

Re: meds:

1. It appears that tinctures would be mixed in water, alcohol, etc. How would powders be taken?

2. When the surgeon prescribes meds several times a day, i.e.
From Repairing the March of Mars:

Rx Comp Syr ScillZi
x 30 drops every 4 hours in water

or

Rx Pulv 2vv Gms xxx
X One every 4 hours
Y Castor Oil

Would a day's dosage be dispensed to the patient, or would he be required to return to the hosp. for each dose? If dispensed, how would they be dispensed? For that matter, the above are liquid and powder; how would pills be dispensed?

More than enough for now. Any help will be appreciated.

TJ, Steward
6th KY
CSA

NoahBriggs
02-25-2008, 06:34 AM
1. Noah, I would really like to see your article and scans of your ledgers. In a previous post, you mentioned that you got your books at Office Depot. Are you using the ones that are blue and maroon (I think) with the title in gilt on the front? What is the design of the labels you are pasting on the front?

Yes, that's what I used. Scans to come in the future. I just got back from Winter of 64 and still need to unpack.

2. On the monthly report, there appear to be several forms to be submitted. In looking at copies of some original documents, it appears that all of these were of 1 piece and were folded accordion-style from top to bottom and then tri-folded the other direction much like a modern map, so that it was a neat packet with a front that gives the month, says "Report of Sick and Wounded" and has an area to list the companies being reported. I am basing my assumption on the apparent creases in the forms. Is anyone familiar with this method of completing and submitting a monthly report? Any idea how to get it printed in large enough format that the print is legible? Could this have been done on the 16 x 21" double-size paper?

At an event you won't need to waste your time with a monthly report. For my supply request at W-64 I copied the form 1 onto a piece of paper 8x10, tri-folded it and wrote on theoutside what it was. It got returned to me with "signed and approved" by the the battalion clerk. I would have written a copy of the same into a ledger as my copy, and had another copy to send to the surgeon general.

3. What is the difference in use of form 11, the Register, and form 15, Morning report? The title of the latter includes "for a regiment, post, or garrison." Perhaps form 15 was not used in the field?

Form 11 is copied into your ledger and used to keep track of who visited your dispensary. form 15 is what you turn in to the battalion's clerks to help them reconcile the morning reports from the companies. Contrary to medical reenactor fantasy the forms themselves are not on huge sheets of paper.

Go to the AC Forum and read up on the School of the Clerk for more infor on Army paperwork.

4. Is there a particular form for reporting casualties after a battle?

There is a form from Kautz which lists the number of killed, wounded and missing from an engagement. It may be found in the aforementioned School of the clerk.

Re: meds:

1. It appears that tinctures would be mixed in water, alcohol, etc. How would powders be taken?

Tinctures are pre-mixed with alcohol. The alcohol is a preservative. Powders could be issued in a folded paper and dumped right on the tongue, dropped into a glass of water, or they could be administered via a trochar - a digestible, thin, pastry-like paper, which was then folded over and the edge sealed by moistening it. It was a proto- "time-release gelcap" and helped to make nasty-tasting medicines more palatable.

2. When the surgeon prescribes meds several times a day, i.e.
From Repairing the March of Mars: . . .

Would a day's dosage be dispensed to the patient, or would he be required to return to the hosp. for each dose? If dispensed, how would they be dispensed? For that matter, the above are liquid and powder; how would pills be dispensed?[/I]

Depends on the med. At W-64 I asked the patients to return at [insert time] for a follow-up, and noted it in my notes in the treatment register. I administered "opium pills", and decided not to trust the patients to take them at the prescribed time. Pills could be dispensed for the "bid" and "tid" prescriptions; you just write it out on the little envelope they are in, and load it up with the proper amount.

I guess more detail once I get around to writing my W-64 AAR. That'll come later in the week.

funhistory
02-25-2008, 02:31 PM
Thanks to Noah's recent mention that he got his ledgers at an office supply store in their accounting aisle, I took a trip to Staples and began to browse. I found their bound ledgers and ultimately bought at Wilson -Jones product with a stock number of "S 300 15-J".

It's a 150-page, two column financial journal, and there's also a 300-page option. There were also ledgers marked: "Record", which would also work, but if I recall correctly, they lacked ruled columns for financial entries, making them more like diaries. Even though the page length of the S 300 is slightly shorter, the thirty-five lines and two-column format matches an original embalmers field journal that we have in the collection. The page width was a match.

Because the off-the-shelf journal had the corporate name, stock numbers and a prominent OCR label on the front flyleaf, I corrected the problem by pasting "new" flyleaves in the journal. Harkening back to a bit of prior experience with old store ledgers, I opted to apply a piece of reproduction ca 1855 wallpaper that I had lying around from another project at the Museum to both the front and end papers. I've opted to paste a business-card sized label that I've made up using Word over the gilt stamped "Journal" on the cover, which looked too modern to my eye. There's a ghost of the printing that shows on the reverse of the former flyleaf; so, I'm on the hunt for appropriate news clips or other items that could be pasted opposite the first page of entries.

I hope that this description is helpful.

TJ6
02-26-2008, 11:50 AM
Contrary to medical reenactor fantasy the forms themselves are not on huge sheets of paper.

Actually, I wasn't fantasizing about huge sheets of paperwork (that would fall more in the category of nightmare) but was basing my thoughts on copies of original documents, particularly some I saw in Letters from the Fieldand from the sample in the back of the 1861 edition of the Manual for Military Surgery. The copies in the former were actually filled out and submitted, and
some of them bear creases that give the impression they were perhaps on 8 x 10 1/2 sheets folded in the middle and then tri-folded the other way. Others look like several forms were submitted along with the Report of Sick and Wounded, and the whole shebang was folded accordion style and then trifolded. I tried printing 1 page of the Report of Sick and Wounded on an 8 1/2 x 11 sheet and the print was very small and the blanks too small to write in. These do, however, have a line at the bottom to subtotal the columns to "carry forward, so perhaps they were printed on individual sheets and then folded together. I would have to look again to be sure, but it seems that the sample in the back of the Manual for Military Surgery was one long sheet.

Go to the AC Forum and read up on the School of the Clerk for more infor on Army paperwork.

There is a form from Kautz which lists the number of killed, wounded and missing from an engagement. It may be found in the aforementioned School of the clerk.

I have been reading it while trying to figure this out. I have not been able to access the 2007 revision you referred to but do have the 2005 version. I believe the form would be Form 21?


Tinctures are pre-mixed with alcohol. The alcohol is a preservative. Powders could be issued in a folded paper and dumped right on the tongue, dropped into a glass of water, or they could be administered via a trochar - a digestible, thin, pastry-like paper, which was then folded over and the edge sealed by moistening it. It was a proto- "time-release gelcap" and helped to make nasty-tasting medicines more palatable.

Are you referring to the making of the tincture with alcohol? I agree, tinctures would be alcohol based or some combination of alcohol and water (Intro to Practical Pharmacy), and decoctions and extracts would be water based, but I think all 3 would be given in small doses, i.e. drops and would be very foul tasting, as they are so concentrated. I was wondering if they would be mixed with some liquid to help disguise the taste (modern herbalists often mix them with orange juice) or if the victim--ehrr, patient--would have these dropped on his tongue.

Would a day's dosage be dispensed to the patient, or would he be required to return to the hosp. for each dose? If dispensed, how would they be dispensed? For that matter, the above are liquid and powder; how would pills be dispensed?[/I]

Depends on the med. At W-64 I asked the patients to return at [insert time] for a follow-up, and noted it in my notes in the treatment register. I administered "opium pills", and decided not to trust the patients to take them at the prescribed time. Pills could be dispensed for the "bid" and "tid" prescriptions; you just write it out on the little envelope they are in, and load it up with the proper amount.

And what you write on the envelope--the Rx or directions in plain English for the patient to read?

Thanks for your help.

TJ

TJ6
02-26-2008, 11:52 AM
Oops. Did not do that post correctly so it's hard to tell what is a quote from Noah's post and what my response is. Sorry. Will have to figure out how to do that properly.

TJ6
02-26-2008, 12:08 PM
Yes, this is helpful. I have not yet bought a blank book so don't recall exactly what they have on them. Is there nothing on the outside that needs to be covered other than the word Journal? No ISBN or anything? On the card with which you covered the gilt lettering on the front, did you label the book according to its use? If so, is there a particular font that should be used? What sort of "news clips will you use to cover the visible label on the reverse side of the flyleaf?

TJ

NoahBriggs
02-26-2008, 12:21 PM
There is a form from Kautz which lists the number of killed, wounded and missing from an engagement. It may be found in the aforementioned School of the clerk.

I have been reading it while trying to figure this out. I have not been able to access the 2007 revision you referred to but do have the 2005 version. I believe the form would be Form 21?

Yes. It prints out on a regular 8.5 x 11, but I have found it's better to cut it down around the edges.

The 2007 edition should be in the Articles section on the AC Forum. You might try looking up "Pvt. Schnapps" on the user profiles, and running through his most recent posts. If that fails, gimme a shout at my e-mail address, which has been printed here several times. I think I can send a copy to you.

Are you referring to the making of the tincture with alcohol? I agree, tinctures would be alcohol based or some combination of alcohol and water (Intro to Practical Pharmacy), and decoctions and extracts would be water based, but I think all 3 would be given in small doses, i.e. drops and would be very foul tasting, as they are so concentrated. I was wondering if they would be mixed with some liquid to help disguise the taste (modern herbalists often mix them with orange juice) or if the victim--ehrr, patient--would have these dropped on his tongue.

Laudanum was supposed to be very stuffy tasting, and my repro has a anise flavor that makes it "off" somehow. I think it was prescribed in x number of drops throughout the day, typically as needed (PRN in doctor notes). The drops were dropped into a glass of water, stirred, and drunk. I don't know if other beverages were used to camouflage the taste.

And what you write on the [pill] envelope--the Rx or directions in plain English for the patient to read?

Good question. The prescription itself would be in either Latin or English, depending on the apothecary and/or the physician. Big debate on whether Latin was really that necessary anymore. If I were writing instructions for patient use, it would make the most sense to write them out in plain English, and that seems to be borne out on the sample patient instruction slips in Parrish. (To be taken _________ a day as per Dr. _______.)

For distinguishing between previous quotes and mine own answers -

I copy the previous post, hit "Reply", paste the whole post, and highlight what I want to italicize. I then click on the I symbol on the top of the message composition window, and the highlighted text will appear bracketed between the symbols "[ I ] [ /I ]", with no spaces or quotation marks in the symbols. You have to have the "fully-featured" option activated in your user profile to do this.

This week is going to be busy, so I don't know when I'll be able to post pictures of how I do my work. Same thing with scanning; it may require something more sophisiticated than my regular scanner. Funhistory described the exact ledgers I use. I have placed labels over my ledger titles, much as funhistory has done, but I did not plaster the inside with marblelike wallpaper per the period books, because I have not taken the time to look for any. I removed the first farby page and started on page 1.

Edited to Add:

Is there nothing on the outside that needs to be covered other than the word Journal? No ISBN or anything?

Nope. This is not a published book, so no need for an ISBN.

On the card with which you covered the gilt lettering on the front, did you label the book according to its use?

Yes.
Patient Register. US Hosp. Dept.
Treatment Register. US Hosp. Dept.
Prescription Register. US Hosp. Dept.

If so, is there a particular font that should be used?

I used Times New Roman, Bold at 72 for the names, and underneath the "US Army Hosp. Dept." was Times New Roman, Bold, at about 16 or 20.

What sort of "news clips will you use to cover the visible label on the reverse side of the flyleaf?

None, cause I cut it out of the book. Newspaper lining should only be for pasteboard boxes and trunks.

funhistory
02-26-2008, 02:44 PM
TJ,

My Wilson-Jones product does have an annoying gold-stamped stock number on the tail of the ledger's spine. Because this was a project tackled last Saturday, I haven't yet experimented to remove it. A bit of isopropyl alcohol should be the most effective treatment to break the bond between the gold foil and the vinyl. Failing that, acetone will be the next step. Failing that, a Pink Pearl eraser (probably the safest and most effective especially if you don't have either of the two solvents lying around).

Like, Noah, I've applied a label over the gold-stamped "Journal" on the cover because the gilding looked too farby. Because my journal is for recording field embalming cases and memoranda regarding charges and payments received (as reflected in the original in the Museum's collection that I've patterned my reproduction from), the cover is simply marked "Journal" in a font that I received with a cd full of CW era fonts. I'd concur with Noah that Times New Roman bold would be appropriate. I've printed mine on an ivory stock (not to make it look "old" but to avoid the bleached, intense white of modern copier papers). I opted for a smaller font (48pt). If you e-mail me (funeralmuseum@ifda.org), I'll set the titles in one of my CW fonts and send them to you to re-space and print.

The news clips that I'm seeking to camoflage the "ghosts" will be appropriate articles copied from issues of "Harper's", "Leslie's", the NY Times (archives is on-line ans should be searchable), the Brooklyn Eagle (now on-line and searchable), etc., in an effort to present the right coverage but also preserve the concept of a field journal where memos, vendors, stock, notes on shipping, contacts, etc., might have been included for safekeeping.

Keep in mind that my impression is civilian as an "embalming surgeon" who was not military. My guess is that it would be inappropriate to make unofficial additions to a "government" ledger. As an alternative to the documentary wallpaper trimmings that I used, you will be able to locate sheets of hand-marbled paper on-line. I tried to pursue that option first, but I've not been satisfied with the options that I've seen, and laziness (as well as the time and materials factor) kept me from marbling my own paper. If you opt for marbled paper, you'll want a comb-marbled pattern (tiny, repetitive feather (or fan) pattern) probably in a color way of maroon, navy, ivory, brown, and/or black.

Again, I hope that this is helpful (and a bit instructive).

fred franze
02-28-2008, 07:18 AM
Hank,
Fort Delaware records show a George B. Fitzgerald, 2nd Lt. 15th Va Cav., CoE. He was hospitalized from 6/16 - 6/18 1864. He died on 11/13/1864 at Fort Pulaski of chronic diarrhea. This might be your man although there are several Fitzgeralds in the card index. There are patient records from that time frame but they are copies and very hard to read. Some are completely illegible. Hope this helps but if this is not your man let me know and I'LL DO SOME MORE LOOKING.
fRED fRANZE

hanktrent
02-28-2008, 10:51 AM
Hank,
Fort Delaware records show a George B. Fitzgerald, 2nd Lt. 15th Va Cav., CoE. He was hospitalized from 6/16 - 6/18 1864. He died on 11/13/1864 at Fort Pulaski of chronic diarrhea. This might be your man although there are several Fitzgeralds in the card index.
fRED fRANZE

THANK YOU! THANK YOU!

That's him, no doubt about it! He must have been hospitalized immediately upon his arrival, since records indicate he was transferred from Ft. McHenry to Ft. Delaware either June 15 or 19. I wonder if he was transferred on the 15th to the hospital, then to the regular prison population on the 19th, thus explaining how both dates could be correct, in a sense.

And his claim to be a 2nd Lieut in the 15th Va. Cav. adds a new alias, since he usually claimed to be either a captain in that company or a lieutenant in the 12th Virginia. He was slightly insane, and so far I've got him identified to six different military positions, none of which he actually held, as far as I can tell. He was really an interesting guy.

Is there any more information on his hospitalization in June 16-18, 1864, like what he was treated for?

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

fred franze
02-28-2008, 10:56 AM
Hank,
I looked at the hospital records yesterday and some of them are very hard to make out. When I get the chance, I'll go back and see if the records for those dates are legible enough to get some more information for you.
Fred Franze

hanktrent
02-28-2008, 11:22 AM
Hank,
I looked at the hospital records yesterday and some of them are very hard to make out. When I get the chance, I'll go back and see if the records for those dates are legible enough to get some more information for you.
Fred Franze

If you can, I would greatly appreciate it! Thanks again,

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

Lightningslinger
06-18-2008, 01:41 PM
Hank,... medical records for Fort Delaware do still exist and one of these days soon I'm going to take the time to research them. They are kept in a repository and not readily accessible to the general public.

Fred, Are you sure you aren't speaking about re-enactor records. Wait! That can't be so can it? There is no central re-enactor repository. Is there? And what does exist don't appear to be accessible to the general re-enactment community.

I really love the title of this thread --- "Around here we do precision guesswork." Was this an original Noahnotatable? Ought to be copyrighted Noah. 8)

And yes... the title actually reflects the state of the re-enacting community.

Walt