PDA

View Full Version : What's yer favorite monument?



Che
02-04-2008, 07:24 PM
Here's mine. Simple, humble and incredibly unique. It speaks volumes without saying much:

http://www.nps.gov/anti/historyculture/images/PA-90-Inf-sm-2.jpg

Here fought the 90th Penna. (Phila)
Sept. 17, 1862
A Hot Place

This monument is a reconstruction of an original monument that was built by the veterans of the regiment. The original monument was made from three original Civil War rifles and survived from sometime in the 1880s to about 1930. The original monument fell into disrepair and with the threat of being stolen it was dismantled.

The replacement monument was planned and funded by Descendants of the 90th Pennsylvania Volunteers. They contracted with Gary Casteel of Four Winds Studio to design and sculpt the monument which was installed and dedicated on the anniversary of the battle in 2004.

Doug Cooper
02-04-2008, 07:34 PM
1st Minnesota Urn, Gettysburg National Cemetery. Dedicated in 1869 by the survivors of the regiment. It was the first monument of any kind placed at Gettysburg.

huntdaw
02-04-2008, 08:28 PM
The Missouri monument at Vicksburg. Truly a 'brother against brother' situation and some of the best troops on either side fighting each other. Kind of sad I think.

sbl
02-05-2008, 06:35 AM
The Twelvth Massachusetts. Local men. I like the carved empty cartidge box at the base.

http://www.anothersoftwaremiracle.com/vgExhibit/monuments/images/monThumbsT/sr136.jpg

Rob Weaver
02-05-2008, 07:02 AM
The 54th Mass monument designed by St Gaudins in Boston. Wonderful detail and motion in the figures. Busts are soldiers from the 54th. The artist's study is in Washington in the Mational Gallery, allowing the viewer to get up close and personal. Magnificent work by one of America's greatest sculptors. (And the inspiration for one of Charles Ives' works.)

90thOHCoG
02-05-2008, 09:10 AM
90th Ohio at Chickamauga. It features a cartridge box and canteen hanging from two crossed muskets, and faces a line of Georgia regiments across the road.

My g-g-grandfather (a private in the regiment) wrote of a trip he took soon after the park opened. He and his daughter sat on the monument on a sunny October day to eat their lunch, and I've done the same.

Doug Cooper
02-05-2008, 11:02 AM
The 54th Mass monument designed by St Gaudins in Boston. Wonderful detail and motion in the figures. Busts are soldiers from the 54th. The artist's study is in Washington in the Mational Gallery, allowing the viewer to get up close and personal. Magnificent work by one of America's greatest sculptors. (And the inspiration for one of Charles Ives' works.)

Good call - that monument is worth the trip to Boston even if you see nothing else. Goosebumps, misty eyes, the whole deal - the single most beautiful rendering of soldiers ever.

pistolpete1863
02-05-2008, 01:08 PM
"Friend to Friend" Monument Gettysburg PA.


1005

lt83
02-05-2008, 01:54 PM
Amen Brother,

I agree with the Friend to Friend monument. The story behind it is amazing.

sbl
02-05-2008, 02:17 PM
I do like the William McKinley Statue at Antietam too.


http://www.nps.gov/archive/anti/monuments/mon_images/McKinley.jpg

ILYankee5
02-05-2008, 02:39 PM
I would have to say mine is a toss up between the Illinois State monument at Vicksburg http://www.nps.gov/archive/vick/il/il_stm.htm and the newer (erected in2005) Confederate Monument at Shiloh http://www.answers.com/topic/shiloh-national-military-park-1

tenfed1861
02-05-2008, 03:29 PM
Mine would have to be the monument to Richard Kirkland at Fredricksburg.Just the message is want gets me.I also like the Kentucky monument at Chickamauga.To be the only state that will have sons on both sides in this massive bloodbath gets me emotional.

Fenian
02-05-2008, 05:51 PM
I love to visit that reclining Wolfhound!

sbl
02-05-2008, 05:54 PM
The kids like that that one.

CheeseBoxRaft
02-05-2008, 06:25 PM
It's hard for me to pick a favorite CW monument, there are so many. But much easier for me to pick the ones I loath. I'd like to see the one's below uprooted from the ground and cast into the sea with the "artist" chained to them.

My 5 LEAST favorites are:

1. Stonewall "Superman" Jackson at Manassas (Is it Stonewall or is it Swartzenegger?) http://cache.eb.com/eb/image?id=2296&rendTypeId=4

2. Maryland Monument at Gettysubrg (I like the subject... I just hate the rendition. It reminds me of two hobos staggering back to their boxcar after a night of binge drinking). http://www.sos.state.md.us/MMMC/pixs/gettysburg6.gif

3. Kansas Monument at Vicksburg (What the heck IS that thing?) http://www.fruitcakecity.net/Vicksburg_Military_Park_044_-_Kansas_Memorial.jpg

4. Longstreet Monument at Gettysburg. (LOVE the General... HATE that iddy-biddy horse he's riding. Yeah, I know why it's like that. Lesson Learned: Never assume the sponsors can cough up the cash for a decent pedistal.) http://www.usa-civil-war.com/GPhotos/g_lngstrt.jpg

5. Tennesse Monument at Gettysburg. (Looks like a modern, computer-etched tombstone. It's so plain and unispiring no one has posted a picture of it on the web that I can find.)

Poor Private
02-05-2008, 06:39 PM
Since you didn't state what period of time?
The Lincoln memorial, Grants tomb, John Paul Jones tomb in Annapolis.

Civil war memorial/statue? The standard M.O.H headstone of our local recepiant.... 1st Lt Charles Barrell 102nd Colored Infantry. I stop often on the way home from work just to say hi and to show he isn't forgotten. No relation, no personal significance. Just to show that he is remembered. Small country cemetary (Hooker), on a little used road.

BlacknBlue1864
02-05-2008, 07:15 PM
My favorite monument is one that no longer exists in the form the veterans wanted it: Burnside's Bridge.

Most folks don't know this but the four small monuments now in a line on the east side of Antietam Creek were originally placed at the ends of the rock walls of the bridge itself. In the 20th century the NPS removed them to the ground during bridge restoration and didn't put them back because it was felt that the they detracted from the bridge's 19th century appearence. Yet they were so unobtrusive you can barely see one of them in this photograph:
http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/glimpses3/images/glimpses4l.jpg

I can understand that reasoning for removing them, but I don't totally agree with it. The modern visitor now looks down at the small monuments on the ground instead of up at them where they were originally located on the bridge. That was where the veterans placed them and expected them to stay forever.

http://www.franklin.ma.us/auto/upload/general/civilwar/456-ma_35_inf.jpg This is one of the removed monuments. Relocating it to the gound made it more accessible to vandals, hence the reason there is no cannonball stacked on top of the others.

There are people bending over backwards to prevent any new monuments being erected at Antietam and I completely agree with them. However, I wish they were as passionate about restoring Burnside's Bridge to it's post-war monumental appearance as the veterans who bled trying to take that bridge intended it.

firstmdes
02-05-2008, 08:11 PM
I do like the William McKinley Statue at Antietam too.

While I recognize the bravery exhibited by Sgt. McKinley in delivering rations to Union troops under fire, I question the purpose of the monument. If Sgt. McKinley had not become President of the United States, would there be a monument commemorating his actions? Are there similar monuments for other Commissary Sergeants? Of course, the first time I visited it was on a hot summer's afternoon after a long day of touring Antietam and I was very disappointed at what I found there. That might be why I don't like it so much! :)

My favorite monument is the MD monument at Antietam:

http://www.nps.gov/archive/anti/monuments/mon_images/MD_Mon.jpg

It lists MD units present at Antietam from both sides. The monument committee included both US and CS representatives. That in itself makes it an interesting one to see! Besides, you can actually go inside the monument, a cool treat on a hot Maryland summer's day!

reb64
02-05-2008, 08:21 PM
thats the one!

sbl
02-05-2008, 08:32 PM
"...If Sgt. McKinley had not become President of the United States, would there be a monument commemorating his actions?.."

No probably not. I really like the female figure on the monument plus I admire McKinley for trying to stay out of the Spanish American War. Roosevelt (who I also admire) thought McKinley had the spine of a "Chocolate Eclare." I don't think Roosevelt knew what McKinley had been through until after San Juan Hill.

sbl
02-05-2008, 08:34 PM
http://www.russfinley.com/d/10878-1/064-04-015.jpg

Toes.

Parault
02-05-2008, 10:03 PM
My favorite monument is the 3rd Arkansas at Gettysburg

http://www.gettysburgguide.com/mon/mark.jpg

6thkentucky
02-06-2008, 02:56 PM
The Kentucky Monument at Vicksburg is very nice. The Jefferson Davis Monument at his birthplace has to be one of the biggest. (Even if it is a smaller version of the Washington Monument.) Don't forget the Confederate Monument at Arlington. It will get you. Look it up and read, "Not for fame or reward..." I wonder how long it took them to find the tiny battle flag I hid there? ;)

Che
02-06-2008, 05:13 PM
Toes.

The Louisiana Monument has the avant-garde toe thing going on too. Same artist as Mississippi.

http://www.your-rv-lifestyle.com/images/DSCN8836small.jpg

"...that was the boot that had a couple of his toes leaking out of the front end of it..."
- Mark Twain; Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

sbl
02-06-2008, 05:32 PM
Unfortunately some newer monuments look like they were from the rubble of the Third Reich or bought at the USSR's going out of business sale.

No reflection on those memorialized of course.

Filthy_Confederate_Scum
02-06-2008, 05:53 PM
Oh, man...

Pardon me for sayin' so, but some of y'all have absolutely no idea of what is pleasing to the eye and what's just ugly modernistic garbage.

Just about all the Victorian era monuments built in the 19th century are superb:

http://www.nysun.com/pics/43041_main_large.jpg

Some of the early 20th century images are equally superb...

http://tigernet.princeton.edu/~cl1972/Images/Gettysburg%20Tour/Gettysburg%20Hoster%20017.jpg

... but by the time we get to mid-20th century we start to see ugly Depression-Era monoliths showing a distinct de-humanistic Soviet style such as the odious Peace Monument at Gettysburg:

http://www.hyperbear.com/acw/gettysburg/photos/acw-getty-peace-mem.jpg

And the mid-20th century monuments are often just thoughtless knock-offs done on the cheap:

http://www.russfinley.com/d/10821-5/064-03-022.jpg

There seems to be a recent attempt to return to Victorian styles with realistic human images, but the overall effect often suffers from clunky compostion of the figures:

http://www.shilohtours.com/navigation/tn.jpg

I am an advocate of NO MORE CIVIL WAR MONUMENTS... Period. What the veterans erected themselves or pre-approved for erection by future generations is all we need. Let the LAND WE PRESERVE be their monument and stop sucking up to "artists" with a self-aggrandizing agenda.

sbl
02-06-2008, 09:26 PM
http://www.shilohtours.com/navigation/tn.jpg

That's the biggest toy soldier diorama I've ever seen.


The Boston Irish Potato Famine Memorial. Before and After.


http://cache.virtualtourist.com/2371551-Downtown_Financial_District-Boston.jpg

Mojo1842
02-06-2008, 10:23 PM
Maybe I'm biased, but...The Regular Brigade monument at Stone's River.

http://www.nps.gov/ser/pgallerycontent/p/l/20070128140944.JPG



What more can be said? The wings of the grateful eagle protecting the eternal sleep of his loyal sons.

rebelyell62
02-07-2008, 01:52 PM
One of THE most stirring of monuments (IMHO) is not a monument by defination.

It is merely a large mound mound of earth found near what remains of the "Zolicoffer" tree in Nancy Kentucky.

Beneath the mound are the remains of over one hundred Confderate boys.
This small, sacred mound brought me to tears. Not only for the boys who rest there, but for the mothers, fathers, wives and sweethearts left behind to wonder where "he" is.

YMHS
Wendell Brown

redleggeddevil
02-07-2008, 03:17 PM
The Louisiana Monument has the avant-garde toe thing going on too. Same artist as Mississippi.

I lived in Gettysburg for about 5 years and I never failed to marvel at just how awful these two monuments truly are. The giant, prehensile toes of Mississippi freak me out, but the Louisiana Monument is in a class all its own. I refer to it as "The Ghost Of Rambo In Drag Arising From Several Stalks Of Asparagus".

Horrible.

As for monuments I like, I have always been partial to the 124th NYSV monument atop Devil's Den. Simple, dignified, and all extremities in proportion.

sbl
02-07-2008, 05:05 PM
124th NYSV monument

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e1/Ellisstaute.jpg

Andrew, Is this it?

redleggeddevil
02-07-2008, 05:20 PM
124th NYSV monument

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e1/Ellisstaute.jpg

Andrew, Is this it?

Yep, that's the one. Many a time I have leaned against it to catch my breath for the long walk back to town.

Company C, 9th KY
02-07-2008, 05:34 PM
Mine would have to be the Zollie Tree. For Confederate General Felix Zollicoffer.

http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/Quarters/1864/zolltree.jpg

Pvt. Kirk

Che
02-07-2008, 07:01 PM
I lived in Gettysburg for about 5 years and I never failed to marvel at just how awful these two monuments truly are. The giant, prehensile toes of Mississippi freak me out, but the Louisiana Monument is in a class all its own. I refer to it as "The Ghost Of Rambo In Drag Arising From Several Stalks Of Asparagus".Horrible. I call that horn being blown by Rambo's ghost the "hash pipe."

sbl
02-07-2008, 07:42 PM
I did not know about this..

"...The Legend of the Zollie Tree

The large oak tree beneath which Confederate General Zollicoffer was killed served as an unofficial monument to the battle.

In 1902 Dorotha Burton began the tradition of placing an evergreen wreath around its trunk. A Union veteran named Henry Trimble donated one acre of land which contained both the "Zollie Tree" and a mass grave containing over 100 unknown Confederate soldiers.

In 1910 Zollicoffer Park was dedicated. Monuments were erected in honor of Zollicoffer and those in the burial trench. The tradition of decorating the tree was continued by subsequent generations, and most recently was carried on by Boy Scouts in the area. On June 6, 1995, the "Zollie Tree" was felled in a thunder storm. Its age, determined by rings, was estimated to be between 250 and 300 years old. A seedling, descended from the original tree, was planted on May 27, 1996..."

sbl
02-07-2008, 07:50 PM
Forgot I had a photo of the CW monument in Topsfield, Mass.


http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u100/sbl1952/Civil%20War%20sites/TopsfieldMa3.jpg

WestTN_reb
02-08-2008, 01:28 AM
One of my favorites is the equestrian statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest in Forrest park in Memphis. The fact that the general and his wife are buried there just adds to it.

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://home.earthlink.net/~azirkle/SH70.jpg&imgrefurl=http://home.earthlink.net/~azirkle/ZSH70.html&h=360&w=504&sz=40&hl=en&start=9&um=1&tbnid=VSK83PVEzM7RdM:&tbnh=93&tbnw=130&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dforrest%2Bpark%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26r lz%3D1T4GGLR_enUS241US241%26sa%3DN

Rob Weaver
02-08-2008, 06:57 AM
I call that horn being blown by Rambo's ghost the "hash pipe."
Those are the two most grotesque monuments on any field, any where I have ever visited. The artwork, however, says some rather unflattering things about the state of historic monuments in the late 1950s- early 1960s. The only thing that was worse than the Miss monument was the purple prose of the audio program which was accessible at the site. "Fences melted before them..." (Good thing Lee invaded Pennsylvania to war upon fences.) Fortunately, that program has gone the way of the buffalo.

sbl
02-08-2008, 09:58 AM
Was that the "Iron Ranger" that NPS Rangers have told me about?

Che
02-08-2008, 06:49 PM
Those are the two most grotesque monuments on any field, any where I have ever visited. Your forgeting the third most grotesque which is also at Gettysburg. Its frequently overlooked because it's not on a tour stop (thank God). It's the so-called Monument to the Soldiers and Sailors (and space aliens) of the Confederacy. And guess what? The artist was the same visionary who did the LA and MS statues! :shock:

http://www.gdg.org/Images/Research/Authored%20Items/Memorials/Confederate/sol.jpg

Using his flag as an umbrella, the big-toed
"space alien" is holding out his deformed
hand to see how hard it's raining.




.

BlacknBlue1864
02-08-2008, 07:11 PM
Your forgeting the third most grotesque which is also at Gettysburg. Its frequently overlooked because it's not on a tour stop (thank God). It's the so-called Monument to the Soldiers and Sailors (and space aliens) of the Confederacy. And guess what? The artist was the same visionary who did the LA and MS statues!
.

I have fequently puzzled over those three monstrosities. How is it that the so-called Christain and conservative South managed to erect avant-garde statues that distort the human form in such hidious ways? Even more bizarre is that Donald De Lue, the sculpter, was from Massachusetts. What were they thinking?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/c/c6/CSA---MS.jpg/408px-CSA---MS.jpg

Ugh... look at those fingers... (shudder).

sbl
02-08-2008, 07:21 PM
"...Even more bizarre is that Donald De Lue, the sculpter, was from Massachusetts..."

FY,

Why?


Donald De Lue

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_De_Lue

ThumbStall
02-08-2008, 07:34 PM
"...Even more bizarre is that Donald De Lue, the sculpter, was from Massachusetts..."

FY,

Why?


Donald De Lue

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_De_Lue
Public relations. Maybe they wanted to make sure they didn't hire another card-carrying Klansman like Gustave Borglum who did Mount Rushmore and the North Carolina Monument at Gettysburg. Pickin' a Paris-taught arteste from "up Nawth" like De Lue may have been an attempt to seem less provincial and more artsy-fawrtsy.

What eyesores. Those monuments aren't just ugly... they are downright creepy. Depending on the angle your standing at, the Mississippi statue looks like he's clubbing the flag bearer to death instead defending him.

redleggeddevil
02-08-2008, 07:45 PM
What eyesores. Those monuments aren't just ugly... they are downright creepy. Depending on the angle your standing at, the Mississippi statue looks like he's clubbing the flag bearer to death instead defending him.

Yes, it always seemed to me as if the man with the giant toes was locked in a death struggle with the man with the hideously extended fingers. I can only guess that the sculptor was frightened by a lanky, double-jointed classmate in art school and spent his entire career seeking artist revenge.

BlacknBlue1864
02-08-2008, 07:58 PM
"...Even more bizarre is that Donald De Lue, the sculpter, was from Massachusetts..."

FY,

Why? I refer to the irony of Southerners hiring a New England Yankee to sculpt statues memorializing Confederates from the deep South.

sbl
02-09-2008, 01:08 AM
FY,

Yes, but he had the resume at the time.


Public monuments

* Triton Fountain, Federal Reserve Bank Building, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1941
* Harvey Firestone Memorial, Akron, Ohio, 1950

* Spirit of American Youth, figures of France and America and urns, U.S. Battle Monument, St. Laurent, Normandy, France, 1953-1956
* George Washington as a Mason, New Orleans, Louisiana 1960, Wallingford, Connecticut 1965, Detroit, Michigan 1966, Alexandria, Virginia 1966, Lansing, Michigan 1982, Indianapolis, Indiana 1987, Flushing, New York
* Boy Scout Memorial, Washington, DC, 1963
* The Mountaineer,West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, 1971
* Louisiana State Monument, Gettysburg Battlefield, 1971
* Mississippi State Monument, Gettysburg Battlefield, 1973
* Rocket Thrower, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park Queens, New York City

Rob Weaver
02-09-2008, 06:25 AM
I'd forgotten the name of that soldier's and sailors monument but I was thinking of it when I posted, too. You see that stylised representation of the human form in print media at the time, too. Maybe an early nuclear-age statement on humanity. I remember one night back in the early 80s, several of us were discussing the artistic merits of the new sculpture just installed on the Gettysburg College campus, celebrating the 150th anniversary of the college. I didn't like it, neither did several of my comrades. Another student asked, "What do you want - another guy on a horse?" To which we answered quickly and honestly, in unison "Yes. I'd be fine with that." :D
PS: The "thumb" has weathered better than I thought it would and looks much better now than it did upon installation.

redleggeddevil
02-09-2008, 07:54 AM
I'd forgotten the name of that soldier's and sailors monument but I was thinking of it when I posted, too. You see that stylised representation of the human form in print media at the time, too. Maybe an early nuclear-age statement on humanity. I remember one night back in the early 80s, several of us were discussing the artistic merits of the new sculpture just installed on the Gettysburg College campus, celebrating the 150th anniversary of the college. I didn't like it, neither did several of my comrades. Another student asked, "What do you want - another guy on a horse?" To which we answered quickly and honestly, in unison "Yes. I'd be fine with that." :D
PS: The "thumb" has weathered better than I thought it would and looks much better now than it did upon installation.

Rob--

You neglected to mention that the "sculpture" in question on the Gettysburg College campus does serve one important function. It has been a convenient stopping point for late-night, inebriated ramblers to stop and "lighten the load". Heck, I even made a long drive there with some co-workers once just so we could re-christen the monument.

Who says I don't appreciate modern art?

Ross L. Lamoreaux
02-09-2008, 08:34 AM
My favorites are tied between the monsterous and the simplistic - the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in downtown Indianapolis always impressed me as a kid going to "the big city" and the impressive Irish brigade monument with the Irish wolfhound was always special since my parents raised woldfhounds in their kennel.

EasySam
02-09-2008, 08:56 AM
1. Missouri at Vicksburg. Dedicated to men of both sides.
2. Tennessee at Shiloh. Realism.
3. Confederate wounded lion at Higginsville, MO. Symbolism.

Gary
02-09-2008, 02:07 PM
Most fun has to be one atop Little Round top. Forgot which unit, but you get an excellent view of Devil's Den from it. The George Rogers Clark Monument in Vincennes is about the best I've seen for the American Revolution. I couldn't go up Wilder's Brigade monument at Chickamauga. It was locked off.

Rob Weaver
02-09-2008, 05:59 PM
You know, the Sherman monument in DC is an impressive sight, especially the side where "war" is personified as a wild-haired fury despoiling the land. An interesting commentary on a "heroic" bronze. Also, the motion on the horses pulling the guns on the Grant statue in Washington are impressive, too.

Shermans_Neckties
02-09-2008, 09:24 PM
Also, the motion on the horses pulling the guns on the Grant statue in Washington are impressive, too. I was wondering when someone would mention the U.S. Grant Memorial. Definately one of the great military statue groupings in the world.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5a/032110_Art_USGAndArt_FmSSW.jpg

Check out the link below for a great pic:

http://static.flickr.com/51/138658704_93f977bee1_o.jpg

Che
02-09-2008, 09:52 PM
Check out the link below for a great pic:

http://static.flickr.com/51/138658704_93f977bee1_o.jpg That pic has suddenly found itself as my desktop wallpaper. :D

Oh, by the way.... I looked this feller in
the eye this very afternoon. I give you the
Private Soldier Memorial at Antietam. Known as
Old Simon, he's the biggest Union soldier on earth:

http://www.nps.gov/anti/historyculture/images/Pvt-Soldier-sm.jpg

sbl
02-10-2008, 07:40 AM
The scale is impressive.


http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Mythology/Images/TalosJason1963.jpg

Impressive but it scared me. I thought "Ray Harryhausen."

No_Know_Nothings
02-11-2008, 07:05 PM
My favorite CW monument is both a memorial and a building; the old Pension Building in Washington DC. An architectural wonder, this gigantic red-brick "barn" was designed by Montgomery C. Meigs and is today home to the National Building Museum which celebrates the architectural arts. It's vast interior has been chosen several times to hold the U.S. Presidential Inaugural Ball.

http://www.nps.gov/history/nr/travel/wash/buildings/dtn37.jpg

As the name implies, the Pension Building was built to house offices used to process and dispence the pensions of the Union wounded, maimed, widowed and orphaned of the Civil War. Many veterans, some of them disabled from war wounds, served as pension clerks there.

Thousand of Union soldiers, sailors and marines endlessly march around the exterior of the building in a awe-inspiring terra cotta frieze that has to be seen in person to fully appreciate:

http://www.nps.gov/history/nr/travel/wash/buildings/dtn38.jpg

http://www.nps.gov/history/hps/tps/clocks/pension.jpg

http://www.goethe.de/ins/us/was/pro/vtour/dc1/images/27/frez3.jpg

sbl
02-11-2008, 08:57 PM
William,

Thanks. Looks like a Roman frieze of their campaigns.

reb64
02-12-2008, 10:35 AM
[QUOTE=Che]Here's mine. Simple, humble and incredibly unique. It speaks volumes without saying much:


I may be mistaken and apologize if so, but your profile pic looks like that marxist terrorist che.

buzzkiller23
02-12-2008, 11:39 AM
Most fun has to be one atop Little Round top. Forgot which unit, but you get an excellent view of Devil's Den from it. The George Rogers Clark Monument in Vincennes is about the best I've seen for the American Revolution. I couldn't go up Wilder's Brigade monument at Chickamauga. It was locked off.

I think you're referring to the 44thNY monument atop Little Round Top. That's a personal favorite of mine as well. What a view.

sbl
02-12-2008, 12:06 PM
http://www.wolfrunstudio.com/PX_MEM/10310_MM_FS.jpg

My daughter (7 at the time) was afraid of several rides at Disney World like the Muppet 3D show, and the raft ride to Tom Sawyer Island. She was afraid of "Snow White's Scarey Adventure. (It's in the name.) The Mayflower at Plimouth...no way.
Surprisingly she was NOT afraid to go up in "the castle."

Che
02-12-2008, 03:39 PM
Surprisingly she was NOT afraid to go up in "the castle." How 'bout the "temple"?

http://www.usa-civil-war.com/GPhotos/g_us_o.jpg

CheeseBoxRaft
02-12-2008, 05:16 PM
Andersonville National Cemetery has one of my favorite monuments...

The Iowa memorial:

http://www.worldofstock.com/slides/PHI2146.jpg

Ironically, ANC also contains one of my least favorite monuments; the super-ugly,
modernistic, Jimmy Carter-era Georgia "sculpture":

http://www.americusgardeninn.com/2003pictures/acf9f.jpg

sbl
02-12-2008, 06:51 PM
You know, she wasn't afraid to up into that one either! Her GGG Grandfather's name is on it.

sbl
02-12-2008, 06:52 PM
reb64, you have to understand irony.

Motown
02-12-2008, 07:12 PM
I may be mistaken and apologize if so, but your profile pic looks like that marxist terrorist che.

Terrorist, freedom fighter, its all perspective

Che
02-13-2008, 08:28 PM
Terrorist, freedom fighter, its all perspective I am a farb revoltionary fighting for the return of polyester uniforms and other glaring anachronisms into reenacting. Coolers in camp. Wristwatches. Modern eyeglasses. Parking allowed next to tents. Lots and LOTS of canvas at every event. Hardcore/Progressive/Campaigners are the enemy! VIVA THE FARB REVOLUTION!

Pssst... buy my T-shirts.
http://www.che-mart.com/images/che_Africa.gif

http://www.che-mart.com/

BlacknBlue1864
02-13-2008, 08:47 PM
That web site is hilarious!

andysmith1989
02-14-2008, 07:00 AM
My family and I have visited Chickamauga many times. So my favorite monuments are at this battlefield. The best include the Ga. Monument, Fl. Monument, the Wilder Tower, and the monuments to units with sculptures of troops in the laying down position. A monument that is not at Chickamauga that is a personal favorite is the UDC Monument at Shilo.

eugene
03-01-2008, 04:07 PM
Farb revolution! Keep up the fight!

crhenderson
03-06-2008, 06:25 PM
Mine has to be the 125th Ohio's monument at Chickamauga. That tiger is rather menacing.
http://home.earthlink.net/%7Enhaldane/pic00036.jpg

6th Alabama
03-06-2008, 07:10 PM
My favorite is a small monument at Shiloh called the Putnam Stump. I am more fascinated with the story than the monument itself The explanation goes something along these lines: A Federal soldier named Putnum was killed. His buddies carved his name in a tree at the spot where he was killed. This carving took place right where the tree came out of the ground. Years later there was disagreement about the exact location of Putnum’s unit. Those veterans went back to the Shiloh battlefield searching for the tree where they carved Putnam’s name. Their intention was to use that tree as evidence of them having advanced to at least that location. After a long, long time spent looking they finally found it. The reason it took so long was the tree had been cut and only the stump remained. The carving was so low to the ground it was still on the stump. A bronze monument in the shape of that stump was made, complete with Putnam‘s name carved on it. It’s easy to miss because it looks just like a stump sitting off on the side of the road.

BlacknBlue1864
03-06-2008, 07:27 PM
Mine has to be the 125th Ohio's monument at Chickamauga. That tiger is rather menacing.
http://home.earthlink.net/%7Enhaldane/pic00036.jpgYes, indeed. Opdycke's Tigers!

Tigers and wildcats seem to be a frequent motif on monumnets.

The First Vermont Brigade has a nice one at Gettysburg:

http://www.horsesoldier.com/catalog/p11902.JPEG

BlacknBlue1864
03-06-2008, 07:30 PM
My favorite is a small monument at Shiloh called the Putnam Stump. I am more fascinated with the story than the monument itself The explanation goes something along these lines: A Federal soldier named Putnum was killed. His buddies carved his name in a tree at the spot where he was killed. This carving took place right where the tree came out of the ground. Years later there was disagreement about the exact location of Putnum’s unit. Those veterans went back to the Shiloh battlefield searching for the tree where they carved Putnam’s name. Their intention was to use that tree as evidence of them having advanced to at least that location. After a long, long time spent looking they finally found it. The reason it took so long was the tree had been cut and only the stump remained. The carving was so low to the ground it was still on the stump. A bronze monument in the shape of that stump was made, complete with Putnam‘s name carved on it. It’s easy to miss because it looks just like a stump sitting off on the side of the road.

Good choice! I remember seeing it on my trip to Shiloh last year. It's off the main tour route but sits almost at the heart of the battlefield. Worth a look:

http://www.flame.org/~cdoswell/shiloh_vburg/ConcreteStumpS_DC17.JPG

Zourab
03-06-2008, 07:39 PM
I've always liked the monument to Co's E & H, 2nd USSS (Berdan's Sharpshooters) at Gettysburg. The hornet's nest carved into it is excellent testimate to the hot place they found themselves in.

http://www.goellnitz.org/summer07g2c/images/090307_015.jpg

crhenderson
03-19-2008, 09:12 AM
My other favorite is the Lion of Atlanta at Oakland Cemetery in Atlanta. This is one moving monument to the confederate dead.
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Pines/3093/lion.jpg

sbl
03-19-2008, 09:56 AM
That is kind of neat.

FloridaConfederate
03-19-2008, 10:12 AM
http://www.eg.bucknell.edu/~hyde/jackson/StonewallsArm-web.jpg

Bummer
03-24-2008, 08:48 AM
One monument that has always gotten to me isn't so special, just a Confederate soldier on top...but he's facing wrong way, looking south not north as most do.
And it's what is carved on back--front--back that always gets me....

"At Appomattox God said to the Confederate soldier
'About face.'
In obedience to that celstial command there was a change of front--
And the grey line faced the future, unashamed and unafraid."

Now can you get better than that?

Charles Weathers
03-25-2008, 02:55 AM
One of my favorites is the equestrian statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest in Forrest park in Memphis. The fact that the general and his wife are buried there just adds to it.

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://home.earthlink.net/~azirkle/SH70.jpg&imgrefurl=http://home.earthlink.net/~azirkle/ZSH70.html&h=360&w=504&sz=40&hl=en&start=9&um=1&tbnid=VSK83PVEzM7RdM:&tbnh=93&tbnw=130&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dforrest%2Bpark%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26r lz%3D1T4GGLR_enUS241US241%26sa%3DN

Just a bit of trivia. Forrest and his wife were originally buried in Elmwood Cemetery (very famous OLD cemetery here in Memphis). In anticipation of a monument he specifically told his family and friends that he did not want to be moved after burial. Years later they did it anyway.

Abrams
03-25-2008, 07:53 AM
I'll say the Confederate memorial at Shiloh had the most impact on me at the moment of seeing it the first time. It still does.

http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/hh/10/hh10f.htm

Number 3 on the list.

Ozark Iron John
03-25-2008, 02:23 PM
http://tennesseeguy.files.wordpress.com/2006/11/forrest.jpg

Isn't this about the most awful monument?

The Forrest Equestrian Statue and Memorial Park is located on Interstate 65 two miles north of Brentwood, Tennessee and seven miles south of Nashville.

hendrickms24
03-26-2008, 12:07 AM
My Favorite one is Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

http://www.copacabana.info/images/rio.jpg

:D

plankmaker
03-26-2008, 12:40 AM
This is my favorite.

Mark Campbell
Piney Flats, TN

The 53rd Pennsylvania Infantry Monument at Gettysburg
from "Gettysburg:Stories of Men and Monuments" by Frederick W. Hawthorne


53rd Pennsylvania Monument, Gettysburg, PA

"…our work here is indeed complete… the Fifty-Third Pennsylvania, vigilant in its country's cause, will hereafter, even when we may all be sleeping the long sleep, still maintain on permanent post a sentinel … and by his silent presence keep alive the same self-sacrificing patriotism [the 53rd] displayed."

With these words, the monument to the 53rd Pennsylvania Infantry was dedicated on a rainy September morning in 1889. The unit was part of Caldwell's Division of the 2nd Corps. Driving the Confederates across the Wheatfield along with other regiments of Brooke's Brigade, the 53rd Pennsylvania advanced to this position, which they held until the Union line in the Wheatfield began to crumble.

When the regimental survivors formed a Veteran's Association in 1880, one of the first projects undertaken was the erection of a monument on the field. They raised $1,500 towards the project which was matched when Pennsylvania appropriated an additional $1,500. The available money was still not enough to hire a name sculptor so company artists employed by contractor H. Oursler and Sons undertook the task of designing a suitable monument. The design ultimately chosen, "The Sentinel," consists of a bronze statue in the complete winter uniform of a Union soldier. He stands watch over the position where the 53rd fought July 2, 1863.

LOCATION: BROOKE AVENUE
DEDICATED: SEPTEMBER 11, 1889
COST: $2,700
SCULPTER: G. WAGNER
CONTRACTOR: GRANITE - H. OURSLER & SONS
BRONZE - HENRY BONNARD BRONZE CO.
MATERIAL: BARRE GRANITE
SPECIFICATIONS: 1ST BASE - 6'0"SQ X 1'8'H
2ND BASE - 4'3"SQ X 1'3"h
DIE - 3'3"SQ X 4'H
CAP - 4'0"SQ X 3'0"h
STATUE - 7'6"
TOTAL HEIGHT - 17'6"

sbl
03-26-2008, 01:30 AM
My Favorite one is Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

http://www.copacabana.info/images/rio.jpg

:D



That statue is only the second or third thing I'd look at if I got to Brazil!

http://www.travel-images.com/brazil196.jpg

sbl
03-26-2008, 09:46 AM
John,

It looks like a female circus rider! Kitsch!

Bitter_Bierce
07-09-2008, 08:03 PM
Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, Cleveland, OH is nothing short of stunning:

http://www.soldiersandsailors.com/

http://www.soldiersandsailors.com/images/colors.jpg

http://www.soldiersandsailors.com/images/advance.jpg

http://www.soldiersandsailors.com/images/shortrangefull.jpg

http://www.soldiersandsailors.com/images/mortor.jpg

More info: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yy4q37zM-R8

GaWildcat
07-09-2008, 08:40 PM
Clement,

WOW that is impressive...would love to see that with my own eyes!

sbl
07-09-2008, 09:05 PM
Wow! I saved those photos. Thank you.

Poor Private
07-09-2008, 10:06 PM
OK, now that was impressive (the youtube video) Everyone in Cleveland should be proud. If I ever get down there I will for sure stop and wander thru there.
Is there a kinda drop in bucket for those who wish to donate, even tho the admission is free?
I have shown the photos to other family members.

3rd_PA_Artillery
07-10-2008, 10:15 AM
Here's mine. Simple, humble and incredibly unique. It speaks volumes without saying much:

http://www.nps.gov/anti/historyculture/images/PA-90-Inf-sm-2.jpg

Here fought the 90th Penna. (Phila)
Sept. 17, 1862
A Hot Place

This monument is a reconstruction of an original monument that was built by the veterans of the regiment. The original monument was made from three original Civil War rifles and survived from sometime in the 1880s to about 1930. The original monument fell into disrepair and with the threat of being stolen it was dismantled.


The replacement monument was planned and funded by Descendants of the 90th Pennsylvania Volunteers. They contracted with Gary Casteel of Four Winds Studio to design and sculpt the monument which was installed and dedicated on the anniversary of the battle in 2004.

Yes, I saw that one at Antietam, I especially liked that one. My favorites are as follows:

The Pennsylvania Memorial, Gettysburg
http://www.littlereview.com/picsmore/05gett58.jpg


The Longstreet Monument, Gettysburg
http://www.keystoneparanormal.com/Longstreet.jpg


151st PA Monument, Gettysburg
http://s3.amazonaws.com/findagrave/photos/2001/222/151stpennsylvan.jpg

Brian Wolle
07-10-2008, 11:46 AM
So funny; there are no Lincolns in Maryland, except for maybe one in the DC fort/parks.

firstmdes
07-10-2008, 05:03 PM
So funny; there are no Lincolns in Maryland, except for maybe one in the DC fort/parks.
Not a statue, but a Maryland cemetery named in his honor:

http://lincolnmd.prepurchaseonline.com/

and

http://www.dpw-archives.org/lincolnmem.html

Also a bust of Lincoln at the National Agricultural Library in Beltsville, MD:

http://www.nal.usda.gov/pubs_dbs/ann_rpts/1993/images/imag11b.jpg

Bitter_Bierce
07-10-2008, 05:34 PM
Is there a kinda drop in bucket for those who wish to donate, even tho the admission is free? Yes, they take donations. They also take donations and memberships here:

http://www.soldiersandsailors.com/Support_Group.htm

nast t
07-11-2008, 02:35 PM
My favorite is the Correspondent's Monument atop of South Mountain at Crampton's Gap, see whole page for detail in monument.


http://www.bohemianbrigade.com/alfred17.html

USMRR
07-11-2008, 02:43 PM
My favorite is the Correspondent's Monument atop of South Mountain at Crampton's Gap, see whole page for detail in monument.

http://www.bohemianbrigade.com/alfred17.htmlI like that one too! How did the makers of "The Blair Witch Project" fail to even get it in the background of the early scenes is beyond me.

firstmdes
07-11-2008, 02:47 PM
My favorite is the Correspondent's Monument atop of South Mountain at Crampton's Gap, see whole page for detail in monument.


http://www.bohemianbrigade.com/alfred17.html
Nice monument in a wonderfully under-visited park, even if it seems a bit out of place! Besides, when you are done enjoying the Correspondents's arch you can go to Burkittsville, Maryland at the bottom of the mountain and look for the Blair Witch! Will they ever find her?

firstmdes
07-11-2008, 02:50 PM
I like that one too! How did the makers of "The Blair Witch Project" fail to even get it in the background of the early scenes is beyond me.
Most of the movie was filmed in Seneca Creek State Park in Montgomery County, Maryland. Only a few town scenes were filmed in Burkittsville.

Sgt_Pepper
07-11-2008, 07:50 PM
The thread has been cleared of off-topic posts. Please continue the positive exchanges. Thank you.

USMRR
07-11-2008, 07:59 PM
Most of the movie was filmed in Seneca Creek State Park in Montgomery County, Maryland. Only a few town scenes were filmed in Burkittsville. Hmmmm.... I never knew that. Thanks for the info.

And thanks to Sgt. Pepper for tidying things up! ;)

hendrickms24
07-13-2008, 08:58 AM
Here is another cool monument that honors one of the finest field commanders the US had in 1777.

http://www.donparrish.com/SaratogaWeb/BootMonument.jpg

5 th Alabama Infantry
07-13-2008, 10:10 AM
Here is another cool monument that honors one of the finest field commanders the US had in 1777.

http://www.donparrish.com/SaratogaWeb/BootMonument.jpg


Who is Benedict Arnold ?

I'll take History for $500.

USMRR
07-13-2008, 11:33 AM
Lincoln's tomb in Springfield, IL has some really nice bronze work of soldiers in combat:

http://www.theroadwanderer.net/66Illinois/images/ILLincolnTomb.JPG

5 th Alabama Infantry
07-16-2008, 05:44 PM
Lincoln's tomb in Springfield, IL has some really nice bronze work of soldiers in combat:

http://www.theroadwanderer.net/66Illinois/images/ILLincolnTomb.JPG


This is my favorite too.

Zourab
07-19-2008, 10:34 PM
This is my favorite too.Let me guess. It's not your favorite because of its artistic merits. It's your favorite because you hate Lincoln and are glad he lies dead below it. Do not think that we have forgotten how you recently trashed this very topic with another gratuitous smack at Old Abe which has since been deleted. You are not fooling anyone.

Bitter_Bierce
07-20-2008, 11:32 AM
My favorite, the oldest intact monument: Hazen's Brigade monument at Stones River. You can hardly read the inscriptions anymore. Erected by the soldiers themselves. I find the misspellings to be particularly wonderful:

HAZEN'S BRIGADE
TO
THE MEMORY OF ITS SOLDIERS
WHO FELL AT
STONE RIVER DEC. 31, 1862
"THEIR FACES TOWARD HEAVEN, THEIR FEET TO THE FOE."
INSCRIBED AT THE CLOSE OF THE WAR

CHICAMAUGA

CHATANOOGA

http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/hazen-monument01.jpg

"In answer to the challenge of this ambitious structure
Time had laid his destroying hand upon it, and it would
soon be "one with Nineveh and Tyre."
- Ambrose Bierce, A Resumed Identity

Just outside the enclosure near the railroad lies the grave of a USCT. Why he is not buried in the nearby National Cemetery may seem strange, but he once owned that land and wanted to buried upon it: http://www.murfreesboropost.com/news.php?viewStory=2421

Dunn Browne
07-29-2008, 03:23 PM
Who is Benedict Arnold ?

I'll take History for $500.


Where is this monument located?

5 th Alabama Infantry
07-29-2008, 04:22 PM
Where is this monument located?


What is Saratoga Battlefield?

Huck
07-30-2008, 10:20 AM
The nice little one on top of Henry Hill at Manassas, that was placed there in 1865.

TheColorBearer
08-13-2008, 12:44 AM
My vote for favorite

http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/JadgTankker/0000toddmonument.jpg

http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/JadgTankker/0000monument2.jpg

TheSignalCorpsGuy
08-13-2008, 11:15 AM
I like the Pennsylvania Memorial at Gettysburg.

yes - it's a big big and gaudy - but it's cool nonetheless - and my GGG-Grandfather's name is on there (105th PA Company D - Sgt Ebenezer Bullers)

Micah Trent
08-13-2008, 02:44 PM
My favorite monument would be the grave sites of my great-great granfathers George H. Harrington and Thomas Wardrip who both fought in the 12th KY Cavalry Co. C US at the Bethel United Methodist Church in Weldon, KY located in Meade County, KY.