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Slickrick214
01-31-2008, 12:53 AM
I've been re-enacting for a few years now and I love reading about the history and culture of the south during the 1860's. As a Confederate re-enactor I must have heard the song Dixie a million times and I always wondered about a few parts of the song.

Smiled as fierce as a forty-pounder!
Look away! Look away! Look away, Dixie's Land!--CHORUS

Forty pounder?? Forty pounder of what?

And what is buckwheat cakes and Injin batter?

GaWildcat
01-31-2008, 03:52 AM
THink man ;)

I believe Mr. Emmet is talking about an Artillery Piece of the Seacost or Seige variety

the other part is food.

flattop32355
01-31-2008, 09:10 AM
Let's put it into context:

Old Missus marry Will, the weaver,
William was a gay deceiver
Look away! Look away!
Look away! Dixie Land.

But when he put his arm around her
He smiled as fierce as a forty pounder
Look away! Look away!
Look away! Dixie Land.

I'd say his grin was as dangerous to women as a fourty pounder siege gun, a rather large gun compared to the 10 and 12 pounder field guns of the time.

Couldn't find anything on "Injin batter", except in relation to India. Buckwheat is a grain often used in pancake batter today, but much more used in CW time frame than modern times for other things.

Spinster
01-31-2008, 09:19 AM
;) Not from around here, are you son? :p

Injun batter--a loose mixture of coarsely ground cornmeal, salt, water, and grease (wild game grease preferred), stirred up, fried up, or boiled up in a real pinch, if you are trying to stretch to feed a bunch of folks.

Both this and buckwheat were a coarser, poorer food than the more refined white flour cakes. Stuck with you better on a hungry hard working day too.


Give the song the rest of its due here "Old Missus" by title, implies a woman of some means and wealth (land not necessarily cash money), and above the age of around 45. By marrying Will, she ceeded certain legal rights to him, unless her late first husband or father had tied up dower rights properly in his will, and the land could be used, but not sold or pledged for debt. Essentially, she's being romanced out of her monetary assets.

Not mentioned in the song, but if there is an "Old Missus" around the place, there is also "Young Missus"--her daughter or daughter-in-law in her 20's, and "Little Miss" --the granddaughter too young to put her hair up. There may also be "Young Miss",--a girl child above 16, wearing her hair up, marriage eligible, but not yet married.

hanktrent
01-31-2008, 10:01 AM
;) Not from around here, are you son? :p

Injun batter--a loose mixture of coarsely ground cornmeal, salt, water, and grease (wild game grease preferred), stirred up, fried up, or boiled up in a real pinch, if you are trying to stretch to feed a bunch of folks.

To add to what she said, "Indian" was a typical synonym for what we'd call "corn." So you had "rye and injun" which was bread made with a mix of rye and cornmeal, or "injun cakes"=corn cakes, or "injun meal"=cornmeal, or "injun pudding"=pudding made of cornmeal, etc.

"Corn" in British usage means whatever the common grain of the country is, so it's wheat in Britain. When British folks arrived here and saw the primary grain of the Indians was maize, they called it "Indian corn." Somehow modern Americans have shortened it to just "corn," but in the period, it was as likely to be shortened to "Indian/injun."

It's not just a southern thing; you see it all over the country in the period.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

sbl
01-31-2008, 10:05 AM
"William was a gay deceiver"


...and of course "gay" ment happy back then.

Slickrick214
01-31-2008, 10:31 AM
THink man ;)

I believe Mr. Emmet is talking about an Artillery Piece of the Seacost or Seige variety

the other part is food.

O yea...had a brain fart I didn't think of that. I should have waited to post instead of doing it 3:30 in the morning.:oops:


;) Not from around here, are you son? :p

Injun batter--a loose mixture of coarsely ground cornmeal, salt, water, and grease (wild game grease preferred), stirred up, fried up, or boiled up in a real pinch, if you are trying to stretch to feed a bunch of folks.

Both this and buckwheat were a coarser, poorer food than the more refined white flour cakes. Stuck with you better on a hungry hard working day too.

No not at all. I pictured some kind of pancake mixture when I heard the song. I just wanted to know what was in it and how these buckweat cakes were made.


"William was a gay deceiver"


...and of course "gay" ment happy back then.

Yes I know what they meant.

FloridaConfederate
01-31-2008, 10:55 AM
Thomas R. Lounsbury, ed. (18381915). Yale Book of American Verse. 1912.

Albert Pike. 18091891

Dixie


SOUTHRONS, hear your Country call you!
Up, lest worse than death befall you!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Lo! all the beacon-fires are lighted,
Let all hearts be now united!
To arms! To arms! To arms! in Dixie!
Advance the flag of Dixie!
Hurrah! hurrah!
For Dixie's land we 'll take our stand,
To live or die for Dixie!
To arms! To arms!
And conquer peace for Dixie!
To arms! To arms!
And conquer peace for Dixie!

Hear the Northern thunders mutter!
Northern flags in South winds flutter!
Send them back your fierce defiance!
Stamp upon the accursed alliance!

Fear no danger! Shun no labor!
Lift up rifle, pike, and sabre!
Shoulder pressing close to shoulder,
Let the odds make each heart bolder!

How the South's great heart rejoices
At your cannons' ringing voices!
For faith betrayed and pledges broken,
Wrongs inflicted, insults spoken.

Strong as lions, swift as eagles,
Back to their kennels hunt these beagles!
Cut the unequal bonds asunder!
Let them hence each other plunder!

Swear upon your Country's altar
Never to submit or falter,
Till the spoilers are defeated,
Till the Lord's work is completed.

Halt not till our Federation
Secures among earth's Powers its station!
Then at peace, and crowned with glory,
Hear your children tell the story!

If the loved ones weep in sadness,
Victory soon shall bring them gladness;
To arms!
Exultant pride soon banish sorrow,
Smiles chase tears away to-morrow.
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Advance the flag of Dixie!
Hurrah! hurrah!
For Dixie's land we take our stand,
And live or die for Dixie!
To arms! To arms!
And conquer peace for Dixie!
To arms! To arms!
And conquer peace for Dixie!

Any grayback warfighter knows this is the proper Dixie.

CheeseBoxRaft
01-31-2008, 12:04 PM
Nice wiki article; very detailed and includes some alternate lyrics:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dixie_(song)

hanktrent
01-31-2008, 12:12 PM
Yet another version. :p

Away down South in the land of traitors,
Rattlesnakes and alligators,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
Where cotton's king and men are chattels,
Union boys will win the battles,

Right away, come away, right away, come away.
Then we'll all go down to Dixie,
Away, away,
Each Dixie boy must understand,
That he must mind his Uncle Sam,
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.
I wish I was in Baltimore,
I'd make Secession traitors roar,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
We'll put the traitors all to rout,
I'll bet my boots we'll whip them out,

Right away, come away, right away, come away.
Then they'll wish they were in Dixie,
Away, away,
Each Dixie boy must understand,
That he must mind his Uncle Sam,
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.
Oh, may our Stars and Stripes still wave
Forever o'er the free and brave,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
And let our motto ever be -
"For Union and for Liberty!"

Right away, come away, right away, come away.
Then we'll all go down to Dixie,
Away, away,
Each Dixie boy must understand,
That he must mind his Uncle Sam,
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.


Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

Spinster
01-31-2008, 12:31 PM
Interestingly, Mr. Rideout quotes the 'political' version that I learned as a child in kindergarten "and conquer peace for Dixie" , rather than the more well-known version made popular in minstrel shows.

The version Hank found, well......yet another "ain't from around hyar are ye?" :p

As for the popular version--lets give it a look too. Will the Weaver---weaving is hard physical labor, despite all the pretty pictures. When full at my loom, and in hand production, I will loose up to 2 pounds a day, weaving a 10-12 hour day. Not liquid, pounds, and I'm just about funneling water and carbs down my throat on the hour.

Will is most definitly a working man--and may have traveled from place to place, with a warped loom, ready to weave off rugs and other household necessities from weft made on the place. May or may not have been good looking, but he was likely quite muscular in legs and arms--a fine figure of a man, and one with plenty of news to share, as he moves from place to place.

And now a lady of some means has up and married him. What a scandal!

sbl
01-31-2008, 02:11 PM
http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=17110

"Definition of Weaver's bottom"

"Weaver's bottom: Inflammation of the bursa that separates the gluteus maximus muscle of the buttocks from the underlying bony prominence of the bone that we sit on, the ischial tuberosity. Weaver's bottom is a form of bursitis that is usually caused by prolonged sitting on hard surfaces that press against the bones of the bottom or mid-buttocks. In proper medical parlance, Weaver's bottom is called ischial bursitis."

and then there is Bottom the Weaver a "rude mechanical"

tompritchett
01-31-2008, 04:47 PM
some alternate lyrics

And for us military types, there is Blood on the Risers. (If you have no clue what I am talking about, consider yourself a "Leg".)

Ky1sgt
01-31-2008, 05:26 PM
And for us military types, there is Blood on the Risers. (If you have no clue what I am talking about, consider yourself a "Leg".)

What a **** of a way to die! :-)

GaWildcat
01-31-2008, 06:27 PM
What a **** of a way to die! :-)

Even us straightleg RedLeg, D@mn Engineers know that one... AirBorne!

hanktrent
01-31-2008, 08:01 PM
And for us military types, there is Blood on the Risers. (If you have no clue what I am talking about, consider yourself a "Leg".)

I'm trying to figure out a connection to Dixie...

Still trying...

Okay, maybe, it was sung to the tune of another song that was also sung during the same war as Dixie?

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

toptimlrd
01-31-2008, 11:46 PM
Ok a bit of a tangent here but Hank and a few others brought up some good points. Often the same song had different lyrics dependent upon whih side you were on. I recently did a short series of songs for my company newsletter talking aout the history and printing the lyrics in hopes some of the folks would take the time to learn a few for their impression. As an example I give you these two very different choruses to "Rally Round the Flag"

Federal:

The Union forever
hurrah boys hurrah
Down with the traitor and up with the star

As we rally round the flag boys
rally once again
Shouting the battle cry of freedom

Confederate:

Our Dixie forever
she's never at a loss
Down with the eagle and up with the cross

As we rally round the bonnie flag
we'll rally once again
shout, shout the battle cry of freedom

tompritchett
02-01-2008, 06:17 AM
Okay, maybe, it was sung to the tune of another song that was also sung during the same war as Dixie?

You were right. For some reason, I had a brain f**t and merged the two in my head. I guess old age really is creeping up on me.

peedeeguard
02-01-2008, 08:19 AM
Also this sure isn't the first time a rabbit has been chased in a different direction from the original post. But I did learn something new, I have never heard the Northern or Southern versions of Dixie. I always heard the minstrel version.


Dewey McRae

flattop32355
02-01-2008, 11:22 AM
Also this sure isn't the first time a rabbit has been chased in a different direction from the original post. But I did learn something new, I have never heard the Northern or Southern versions of Dixie. I always heard the minstrel version.

Putting your own lyrics (to serve your own purpose) is nothing new.

Half of the songs in the United Methodist hymnal done by John and Charles Wesley were popular drinking song tunes set to "more appropriate" lyrics. That way, those of the congregation only had to learn the new words with the already familiar tunes.

I been driving my children crazy for years by making up new lyrics on the spot to whatever songs are playing at the time, usually related to whatever we are talking about at the time. It's particularly fun if you don't like the song, anyway.

FloridaConfederate
02-01-2008, 12:35 PM
THE SOUTHERN WAGON
as sung to Wait for the Wagon

Come, all ye sons of freedom, and join our Southern band,
We are going to fight the Yankees and drive them from our land.
Justice is our motto and providence our guide,
So jump into the wagon, and we'll all take a ride.

CHORUS: Wait for the wagon! The dissolution wagon!
The South is the wagon, and we'll all take a ride.

Secession is our watchword, our rights we all demand;
To defend our homes and firesides, we pledge our hearts and hands;
Jeff Davis is our president, with Stephens by his side;
Brave Beauregard, our General, will join us in the ride.--CHORUS

Our wagon is the very best, the running gear is good;
Stuffed 'round the sides with cotton, and made of Southern wood.
Carolina is the driver, with Georgia by her side,
Virginia holds the flag up, and we'll all take a ride.--CHORUS

There are Tennessee and Texas also in the ring;
They wouldn't have a government where cotton wasn't king.
Alabama and Florida have long ago replied;
Mississippi and Louisiana are anxious for the ride.--CHORUS

Old Lincoln and his Congressmen with Seward by his side,
Put old Scott in the wagon just for to take a ride.
McDowell was the driver, to cross Bull Run he tried,
But there he left the wagon for Beauregard to ride.--CHORUS

Manassas was the battleground. the field was fair and wide;
They Yankees thought they'd whip us out, and on to Richmond ride;
But when they met our "Dixie" boys, their danger they espied;
They wheeled about for Washington, and didn't wait to ride.--CHORUS

The Tennessee boys are in the field, eager for the fray;
They can whip the Yankee boys three to one, they say;
And when they get in conflict with Davis by their side,
They'll pitch into the Yankee boys and then you'll see them slide.--CHORUS

Our cause is just and holy, our men are brave and true;
We'll whip the Lincoln cutthroats is all we have to do.
God bless our noble army; in Him we all confide;
So jump into the wagon and we'll all take a ride.--

FloridaConfederate
02-01-2008, 12:41 PM
One of my favorites and one I have sung in the ranks....great lyrics



THE VALIANT CONSCRIPT

as sung to Yankee Doodle Dandy

How are you, boys? I'm just from camp and feel as brave as Caesar
The sound of bugle drum and fife has raised my Ebeneezer.
I'm full of fight, odds shot and shell, I'll leap into the saddle
And when the Yankees see me come, Lord how they will skedaddle!

cho: Hold your head up, Shanghai Shanks,
Don't shake your knees and blink so;
It is no time to dodge the act
Brave comrades, don't you think so?

I was a ploughboy in the field, a gawky lazy didger,
When came the conscript officer and took me for a sodger.
He put a musket in my hand and showed me how to fire it,
I marched and counter-marched all day. Lord, how I did admire it!

With corn and hog fat for my food, and digging, guarding, drilling,
I got as thin as twice-skimmed milk and was scarcely worth the killing.
And now I'm used to homely fare, my skin as tough as leather,
I do guard duty cheerfully in any kind of weather.

I'm brimful of fight, my boys, I would not give a "Thank 'ee"
For all the smiles the girls can give until I've killed a Yankee.
High private is a glorious rank, there's wide room for promotion;
I'll get a corporal's stripes some day when fortune's in the notion.

"tis true I have not seen a fight nor have I smelt gunpowder,
But then the way I'll pepper them will be a sin to chowder.
A sergeant's stripes I now will sport, perhaps be colour-bearer,
And then a captain--good for me, I'll be a regular tearer.

I'll then begin to wear the stars and then the wreaths of glory,
Until the army I command, and poets sing my story.
Our Congress will pass votes of thanks to him thast rose from zero;
The people in a mass will shout, "Hurrah! Behold the hero!"

(he fires his gun by accident)

What's that? Oh dear! A boiler's burst! A gaspipe has exploded!
Maybe the Yankees are hard by with muskets ready loaded.
Oh gallant soldiers, beat 'em back. I'll join you in the frolic
But I've a chill from head to foot, and symptoms of the colic.

jda3rd
02-10-2008, 10:28 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Brower


No relation, though.

Frank Brower
Jeff Davis Artillery

Spinster
02-11-2008, 12:44 AM
Just for Bernie, who has probably already found this one, an 18th century advertising song:

Hark the Herald Angels Sing
Beecham's Pills are Just the Thing
Peace on Earth and Mercy Mild
Two for an Adult, One for a Child

And Just for Scott:

One of the funnier things in my long history of challenging doctors with with odd aliments, was hobbling in bent over double. Doc prodded bit, got a couple of sharp yelps, leaned back and said:

Miz Lawson, I know what is wrong with you. It is a rather unusual ailment, and one that has me a bit puzzled. I know it simply because I did a long residency in Central America. So tell me, how the **** have you managed to get a textbook case of weaver's bottom?

Doc, I replied, would weaving 15 hours a day for the last three weeks have something to do with that? :rolleyes:

Man's been my doc for nearly 20 years now--and is a fine hand at looking for 19th century disease in me.

toptimlrd
02-11-2008, 12:57 AM
Miz Lawson, I know what is wrong with you. It is a rather unusual ailment, and one that has me a bit puzzled. I know it simply because I did a long residency in Central America. So tell me, how the **** have you managed to get a textbook case of weaver's bottom?

Doc, I replied, would weaving 15 hours a day for the last three weeks have something to do with that? :rolleyes:

Man's been my doc for nearly 20 years now--and is a fine hand at looking for 19th century disease in me.


Thanks for the chuckle Mrs. Lawson.

Joanna
02-11-2008, 11:01 AM
Mr. Trent - would you be able to share the source of that "northern" version of Dixie you posted? My DH would absolutely love to learn those lyrics!

Thanks and regards,
Joanna Jones

tater
02-11-2008, 11:03 AM
Tom, I got a GOOD laugh outta that. Can't you just see an infantry battalion passing in review singing that wonderful tune.

" gory gory what a hellof a way to die
when your suspended by your braces and you don't know how to fly
gory gory what a hellof a way to die
he aint gonna jump no more"

or, for you more grotesque types

"gory gory what a hellof a way to die
with a rifle in your --- and a bullet in your eye
gory gory what a hellof a way to die
he aint gonna jump no more"

We sang either, depending on our 1SGs mood. :p

hanktrent
02-11-2008, 11:42 AM
Mr. Trent - would you be able to share the source of that "northern" version of Dixie you posted? My DH would absolutely love to learn those lyrics!

Thanks and regards,
Joanna Jones

There are several cut-and-pastable versions online, and I don't remember which I used, but here's an image of a broadside, no publication date though.

http://memory.loc.gov/rbc/amss/cw1/cw105910/001q.gif

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

Marc
02-11-2008, 12:01 PM
These could be the words to Hank's broadside copy

UNION DIXIE
Music: Daniel Decatur Emmett
Words: Anonymous

Away down South in the land of traitors,
Rattlesnakes and alligators,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
Where cotton's king and men are chattels,
Union boys will win the battles,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.

CHORUS: Then we'll all go down to Dixie,
Away, away,
Each Dixie boy must understand
That he must mind his Uncle Sam,
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.

I wish I was in Baltimore,
I'd make Secession traitors roar,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
We'll put the traitors all to rout.
I'll bet my boots we'll whip them out,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.

CHORUS: Then they'll wish they were in Dixie,
Away, away,
Each Dixie boy must understand
That he must mind his Uncle Sam,
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.

Oh, may our Stars and Stripes still wave
Forever o'er the free and brave,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
And let our motto ever be --
"For Union and for Liberty!"
Right away, come away, right away, come away.

CHORUS: Then they'll wish they were in Dixie,
Away, away,
Each Dixie boy must understand
That he must mind his Uncle Sam,
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.

hanktrent
02-11-2008, 12:16 PM
These could be the words to Hank's broadside copy

UNION DIXIE
Music: Daniel Decatur Emmett
Words: Anonymous


I just realized, the broadside image I posted is a different Dixie parody, not the same as I posted before (which is the Emmett one that Marc posted). So there's at least two of 'em running around. The idea must have been so obvious, I wonder if there's more?

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

Slickrick214
02-13-2008, 01:33 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfwcon_r9eQ

JustinPrince
02-14-2008, 11:31 AM
These could be the words to Hank's broadside copy

UNION DIXIE
Music: Daniel Decatur Emmett
Words: Anonymous

Away down South in the land of traitors,
Rattlesnakes and alligators,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
Where cotton's king and men are chattels,
Union boys will win the battles,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.

CHORUS: Then we'll all go down to Dixie,
Away, away,
Each Dixie boy must understand
That he must mind his Uncle Sam,
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.

I wish I was in Baltimore,
I'd make Secession traitors roar,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
We'll put the traitors all to rout.
I'll bet my boots we'll whip them out,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.

CHORUS: Then they'll wish they were in Dixie,
Away, away,
Each Dixie boy must understand
That he must mind his Uncle Sam,
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.

Oh, may our Stars and Stripes still wave
Forever o'er the free and brave,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
And let our motto ever be --
"For Union and for Liberty!"
Right away, come away, right away, come away.

CHORUS: Then they'll wish they were in Dixie,
Away, away,
Each Dixie boy must understand
That he must mind his Uncle Sam,
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.

The true version of Dixie. :D We sing this all the time in the Frontier Brigade, almost as soon as we can go to the Route Step while marching. For lyrics, however, instead of "Then they'll wish they were in Dixie" we use "We'll plant our flag in Dixie."

Also it seems a verse has been omitted:

Away down South where grows the cotton,
Seventy-six seems quite forgotten,
Right Away, Come away, Right Away, Come Away,
Men with Rebel shout and thunder,
Tear our good ol' flag asunder,
Right away, come away, right away, come away,

ILYankee5
02-14-2008, 11:48 AM
Oddly enough, there is an article in the new issue of Civil War Times discussing this topic and the true origins of the tune.