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Pete K
01-08-2008, 05:40 AM
Don't seem to remember any discussion on this one from the Histroy Channel? What did you folks think?
Juist asking!

Pete

ejazzyjeff
01-08-2008, 08:39 AM
I thought it was pretty good. Nothing really jumped out as what I didn't know before, except for Booth's Diary. Apparently only about 12-18 pages where suppose to be missing, but the show stated the FBI inspected the diary book and claimed that in actuality about 51 pages are missing.

reb4lee
01-08-2008, 09:08 AM
I saw it late one night about 2 weeks ago. I thought it was a pretty good documentary. Learned a few things that I didn't know before. I can't remember his name, but I felt bad for the doctor who was sent to prison for helping booth with his leg. .

sbl
01-08-2008, 09:21 AM
I hope it answered any of the questions that folks had about Booth a few weeks ago.

I going out on a limb that the missing pages were used for toilet paper.

tompritchett
01-08-2008, 09:23 AM
I going out on a limb that the missing pages were used for toilet paper.

No that was what the old Sears & Roebuck catalog was used for, at least back when my father was a child growing up on a farm in the years immediately after WW I.

reb64
01-08-2008, 10:15 AM
Just read a book before this came out that told of man like booth living and dying in oklahoma, his muied remians went on a sideshow. plausible evidence, but who knows .

MBond057
01-08-2008, 12:24 PM
Aaron,

That would be Dr. Samuel Mudd.

Spinster
01-08-2008, 12:39 PM
Just read a book before this came out that told of man like booth living and dying in oklahoma, his muied remians went on a sideshow. plausible evidence, but who knows .

The tales of Booth surviving and escaping pop up occassionally throughout the Deep South and Trans-Mississippi--either places a man could go and have no questions asked, or places where a small community could shelter one who kept a low profile.

Similar stories are documented to families in Mississippi, Alabama, and Texas, with a common basis of a handsome but quiet "uncle' who lived upstairs and did not socialize outside of a select few, but who had money and the occassional important visitor. Most come today in the form of "recollections" of elderly women written down in the mid-20th century, consisting of whispered rumor concerning that "uncle" they remembered from childhood.

reb4lee
01-08-2008, 01:08 PM
Aaron,

That would be Dr. Samuel Mudd.
Yes that is the one! Thanks for helping me remember!

tompritchett
01-08-2008, 05:32 PM
That would be Dr. Samuel Mudd.

Somebody saw National Treasure II also.

ejazzyjeff
01-09-2008, 12:41 AM
I hope it answered any of the questions that folks had about Booth a few weeks ago.

I going out on a limb that the missing pages were used for toilet paper.


You know, I never thought about that. I guess Booth was too civilized to use leaves.

Pete K
01-09-2008, 04:42 AM
Is there anything about the old saying "your name is mud" (meaning a less tha favorable person) and the Dr. Mudd of the night of the assassination? Is this just an old wive's tale/urban myth? I've heard both. One story is the phrase refered to the Dr'.s reputation being ruined by helping Booth, the other is "running the family name into the mud" by poor behaviors.

hanktrent
01-09-2008, 05:32 AM
Is there anything about the old saying "your name is mud" (meaning a less tha favorable person) and the Dr. Mudd of the night of the assassination?

Here's the phrase back to 1823 England in Slang. A Dictionary of the Turf, the Ring, etc., so it clearly didn't originate with Dr. Mudd:

http://books.google.com/books?id=HfUSAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA122


Mud--a stupid twaddling fellow. 'And his name is mud!' ejaculated upon the conclusion of a silly oration, or of a leader in the Courier.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

sbl
01-09-2008, 06:53 AM
Heh Heh...he said "ejaculated!"