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crowley_greene
05-13-2006, 09:04 PM
I was pretty active in the CWR Discussion Board from 1999 to 2003, when some unfortunate turns in life swept me away from reenacting for a couple of years.

I have begun my return to the lifestyle this year (it surely is in the blood), and when I came back to the Discussion Board in March it was like arriving in a changed and somewhat unfamiliar town -- one cannot put his foot in the same river twice, I suppose. I even had to re-register to the new format.

There are some of the old names I knew then, and a lot of new ones. And new terms have entered the vocabulary, or at least terms that I don't recall from three years ago.

I would be indebted if some of you would enlighten me as to the meanings of such terms as "troll", and "hardkewel". Maybe even using the terms in a sentence would help. :)

Also, I'm sorry to see that some old friends no longer appear on the member list: Uncle Beau (who I met at Wilson's Creek 2000) and klcoombs (Kathryn Coombs, who I met on a trip to D.C. in 2001). Does anyone know what became of them?

Happy to be back and healthy and employed again.

Murray Therrell

MStuart
05-13-2006, 10:28 PM
Welsome back "Parson" Crowley Greene! You were a valued contributor then, and I have no doubt things won't change. It's good to "see" you're back.

I'm not going to try and define "hardkewl" (I'll take a risk and say the word means different things to different folks) In time, you'll know one when you see it, though. A "troll" is someone who makes trouble on the board for the sake of making trouble. They rarely sign their real name, and usually start the flame wars with "us vs. them" type of topics. Probably used to be called a "flamer".

Mark

crowley_greene
05-13-2006, 11:04 PM
A "troll" is someone who makes trouble on the board for the sake of making trouble. They rarely sign their real name, and usually start the flame wars with "us vs. them" type of topics. Probably used to be called a "flamer".

Mark

Ah yes! Flamers! I do remember those persons very well, the perpedual nemeses of the board moderator.

I see you recalled "Parson". It had slipped my mind that that's how I usually signed my posts. Yes, my heart is still very much in the chaplain role.

Murray Therrell

flattop32355
05-14-2006, 12:01 AM
I'm not going to try and define "hardkewl" (I'll take a risk and say the word means different things to different folks)

My take on the "hardkewl" definition: Someone who buys the most expensive and "authentic" gear available, then is afraid to get it dirty by actually reenacting. The hardkewl goes to an event and does not participate in the event's activities; He's mainly there to be seen by others. He may or may not know anything about drill and other aspects of soldier life, but he looks "Marvelous". Hardkewls tend to congregate together at their own campfires, somewhat away from The Great Unwashed, and tend not to have contact with them.

They are sometimes also known as "Posers", partly because they are said to strike soldier-like postures to impress others. They look "Marvelous".

Others can add to the definition. In short, to be called a "hardkewl" is not a compliment.

tompritchett
05-14-2006, 01:22 AM
Kinda like the Civil War Reenactors version of Bill Maudlin's "garatroopers".

Sgt_Pepper
05-14-2006, 11:27 AM
My take on the "hardkewl" definition: Someone who buys the most expensive and "authentic" gear available, then is afraid to get it dirty by actually reenacting.

A good definition, sir; if I may add to it, my personal caveat that not all those who maintain their top-drawer kits in the best possible condition are such "hardkewels". A.V. Kautz says in his Customs of Service for Non-commissioned Officers, et cetera that NCOs must always maintain themselves and their equipment, uniform and accoutrements in as good a condition as possible at all times, so as to be an example to the corporals and privates, and present a picture of soldierly respectability and reliability to the officers... or words to that effect; the book is a floor below and I've no desire for any more exercise than necessary, it being the Sabbath and all.

As for the good Parson's (and a hearty "Welcome back," sir!) question about the term "troll", it may not be widely known that it is the short form of "troller", as in one who trolls while fishing - in this case, fishing for reactions to his inflammatory posts. I've noted how the short form has given rise to such reactions as, "Back under your bridge, troll!" and other references to the nursery story of "The Three Billy Goats Gruff" by the Brothers Grimm. Let's have a show of hands: how many are (also) old enough to remember when such tales were more popular?

My goodness, I'm garrulous today. Please excuse my verbosity, I'd no intention to shanghai the thread. Again, Parson Greene, it's good to have you back once more.

indguard
05-14-2006, 12:17 PM
...not all those who maintain their top-drawer kits in the best possible condition are such "hardkewels"

Um, verbose or not, no one ever SAID that just ANYONE in a "top-drawer" kit was a Hardkewel! But, the above definition is pretty complete. They have great stuff, but know nothing, participate not at all, never get dirty, cannot drill, etc.

I'd also note that most Hardkewels seem to be between 20 and 30 years of age, are usually single, and generally have been in the hobby for less than 5 years. But, this is only a general rule and not as universal as the definition a few posts above this one.

The worst part about them, though, is the finger pointing and their loud way of making fun of every one that walks past them. It's this loudmouthed gaffawing piled on top of their posing that make the "mainstreamer" hate all Hardcores. The Hardkewel is the worst representative of authentic reenactors.

I would like to mention a variation of the Hardkewel that some of you may have seen. This is a Hardkewel that comes and camps off in the corner, but isn't all spit and polish. They walk around without shoes most of the time, don't wear their full uniform, but otherwise are just like the Hardkewel in that they don't participate or drill and they sit around and make fun of every one else. These guys most often portray some western unit - hence the excuse of laying about like hobos without proper dress.

I remember ging to a national event once (it shall remain nameless here) where I was contacted by the event people about the size of my bttn. I was only able to bring about 125 men to the event and the event people had another bttn that was only going to field about 60. The brigade that I was assigned to asked if I could absorb the 60 man mini bttn and share the command duties with some of their staff officers. I agreed.

When we got on grounds I had my 125 men. The other group showed up with only 30 but they were in all the best unifroms, etc. (they shall remain nameless in this post, too). So, their commanding officer, a Major, came to me and told me that we would be using HIS flag for three of the 6 battles, that he would command the bttn in those same battles and that he would lead all the drills. This was his opening conversation, too!

So, I'm thinking, "Yeah, your 30 guys gives you the power to command MY 125 for most of the weekend?!" I had 5 companies he had 2. Of course, I would have had no problem using his flag for a few of the battles and I would have had no problem using his staff for some of the staff positions, but commanding the whole for most of the event? Hardly!

Needless to say, the General and I had a little talk!

That was an example of a Hardkewel imagining that he should automatically be given full control because he was so much "better".

bill watson
05-14-2006, 04:58 PM
Well, actually, that might not be "hardkyewl," since it demonstrates some level of interest in actually participating and some level of planning and organization since there were 30 of them. A true hardkyewl, kind of by observed definition, is usually on sutler row and is usually posturing and is usually associated with not more than two others. Once they get beyond three people, the quest for ... I'm really at a loss for words here, but let me fumble around and some others can help out. The quest to be different (and better) than everyone else loses some of its appeal the more people there are who are different (and better). So if you put four hardkyewls together, they'll split into two groups. Each different. Each better than anyone else. See how it works? So a "leader" of 30 organized people is a different kind of bird. It might be simply a good group of reenactors, and who knows how they do the math that led them to claim what looks to me like half the time while having about 1/6 the numbers? Maybe they think 30 Cool Sutler uniforms equals 90 Made in Pakistan uniforms, plus they had better hats? I dunno. Was this individual's known skill in drill that much better than yours? I dunno. Were those 30 guys the equivalent of three-year vets in maneuvering, while your guys were only one-year vets? I doubt it, but "I dunno." But it sounds like he was a pretty good organizer, and probably a pretty good leader, because he set out to claim for his group enough of a share in the conduct of the "regiment" to satisfy their need to have a respected leader as their own spearpoint -- a need for those 30 guys.
So how did it all turn out?

All this kind of thing has some of us scratching our heads; it is far more common over at this end of the hobby for guys to be seeking rear rank two status, not officer status. Leadership is associated very much with the kind of nonsense you experienced and nobody much wants to deal with it. Unfortunately, to put together events that offer verisimilitude beyond the company level, somebody has to.

indguard
05-14-2006, 05:36 PM
...it sounds like he was a pretty good organizer, and probably a pretty good leader...

Somehow, this is doubtful. He registered about 80. Showed with 30. And his battalion was fom the local state in which the event was being held! I, on the other hand, had people from hundreds of miles away in attendance.

I should probably say, though, that this event was more than a decade ago, before the "Hardkewel" came about in the form the now are.

(I am struggling not to get too specific as I don't want to be finger pointing at specific units in specific states.)


Unfortunately, to put together events that offer verisimilitude beyond the company level, somebody has to.

Ha. Ain't it the truth!

And the second someone steps forward to try and pull things together you get 20 "Hardkewels" to say he sucks, is stupid, and can't do anything worth a ********************!

Ha, ha.

TeamsterPhil
05-14-2006, 07:59 PM
This might be the most useful post on this thread.

Uncle Beau is still kicking around up in Iowa, the last I saw him. He was in possession of a really nice looking rat, which the Rebs were desperately trying to obtain.

Kathryn is still in Virginia, but not posting anywhere very much.


Phil Campbell

cblodg
05-15-2006, 09:18 AM
Huh, that post about the 30 man bttn commander wanting to command all, hits far closer to home. I wont go into details, but its happened more than once to my unit in some local events/parades. I know its not quite the same as a bttn sized event, but.

That is an over-arching problem. You get some of these units, who believe themselves to be greater than the whole, and no matter where they go, its their officers and their NCOs. I have never understood why it is when one unit asks another to participate at a parade/LH (and gets paid to do so), the asking unit brings no officer, 7 men; to our officer and 13 men. Yet, because they are the listed unit, take home all bacon. I tried suggesting that we split the $$ in equal proportions to man power ratio. Basically I was told that it should be considered a privelage just be there with *them.*

Sorry for rambling, someone else can have the bull-horn.

Chris

FWL
05-15-2006, 09:56 AM
My take on the "hardkewl" definition: Someone who buys the most expensive and "authentic" gear available, then is afraid to get it dirty by actually reenacting. The hardkewl goes to an event and does not participate in the event's activities; He's mainly there to be seen by others. He may or may not know anything about drill and other aspects of soldier life, but he looks "Marvelous". Hardkewls tend to congregate together at their own campfires, somewhat away from The Great Unwashed, and tend not to have contact with them.

They are sometimes also known as "Posers", partly because they are said to strike soldier-like postures to impress others. They look "Marvelous".

Others can add to the definition. In short, to be called a "hardkewl" is not a compliment.

Bernard, it occurs to me, upon reflection, I don't think I've ever met or seen a "hardkewl". Now I was at sutler row in McDowell this year and a couple of confederate fellows were glaring at me when I was at the Richmond Depot Tent asking questions about a confederate kit (my first-I was asking for advice-the Richmond Depot fellow was fine). They were young confederate haughty fellows that seemed rather pleased with themselves. But I just chalked that up to my Yankee impression. Perhaps these were the dreaded kardkewls.

I for one would enjoy seeing a company of Militant Farbs and Hardkewls together in a company. I seen many Militant Farbs here in New England. But then I enjoy stirring the pot.

Regards

RJSamp
05-15-2006, 11:41 AM
Well Frank, you seldom meet them (or want to).....we've got them in the Midwest....although boredom, EBUFU, or WWII reenacting has reduced their 'participation' the last few years.

They are authentic looking as all get out....but have the following non authentic characteristics:
don't belong to a unit at the event
don't participate in drill
don't participate in the sham battles
love to talk condescendingly about the commanders, units, events, other soldier's that don't measure up (well maybe that's authentic, but at a smaller scale then ACW soldier's who would be more apt to talk disparingly about another State, or Brigade, or Corps, rather than someone in their own company)
usually are unable to drill or manage simple evolutions (Battalion, By Right Into Line is always a good test, or Battalion Change Front Forward on 10th Company)
if they stay overnight they don't camp on the company street....usually bivouac off in a corner even though the event 'standards' call for a 'garrison' camping impression.
Rain...they'll take off at a moment's notice, even if they've driven hundreds of miles....even if the event wasn't called off and the sun is coming out...so much for reenacting Chantilly....

etc.

Carry on my wayward son.....

flattop32355
05-16-2006, 12:19 AM
Bernard, it occurs to me, upon reflection, I don't think I've ever met or seen a "hardkewl".

My last encounter was at Carnifex Ferry. A couple of them were camped between us and the civilian area. They plopped their gear down, spoke to no one else during the entire time, did not participate in the activities of the event, even going so far as to milling about among the spectators during the Saturday battle (getting face time?), and left early Sunday.

While I realize it takes all kinds to make the world go 'round, I can't help wondering what it is these people get out of attending an event.

Guess I'll just keep shaking my head and smiling at some of the things I see in this hobby.