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ginny74
12-27-2007, 04:04 PM
Hello all! Because I am experiencing reenacting withdrawal, I have decided to think about some new activities I would like to try when it all starts back up. I was thinking that maybe I would see if some of my young lady companions would be interested in rolling some bandages for our lads in grey. Problem is, I don't know anything about Civil War era bandages. I have always imagined something that resembled an Ace bandage. That is, a roll of cloth, maybe something like muslin (:confused: ) But again, I have no clue whatsoever. Maybe somebody could help me out and give me an idea about how to roll bandages. Thank you in advance!

mmartin4600
12-27-2007, 04:40 PM
Hello all! Because I am experiencing reenacting withdrawal, I have decided to think about some new activities I would like to try when it all starts back up. I was thinking that maybe I would see if some of my young lady companions would be interested in rolling some bandages for our lads in grey. Problem is, I don't know anything about Civil War era bandages. I have always imagined something that resembled an Ace bandage. That is, a roll of cloth, maybe something like muslin (:confused: ) But again, I have no clue whatsoever. Maybe somebody could help me out and give me an idea about how to roll bandages. Thank you in advance!

Pg. 304 (http://books.google.com/books?id=1Q2fl_Fpgr4C&pg=RA1-PA304&lpg=RA1-PA304&dq=civil+war+roller+bandage&source=web&ots=D71SEF83mU&sig=DjfG685QL7wyJgm-i_NJUrOhaJU) of the Hospital Steward's Manual discusses this very topic. A ready supply of rolled bandages would be much appreciated, I'm sure.

NoahBriggs
12-27-2007, 11:17 PM
Three to Five yards times the width.

Widths:
1 inch for those finger/toe wrappings
2 inch is pretty standard
3 inch
4 inch
6 inch wide for those large wounds.

http://usera.imagecave.com/thesewingacademy/NoahBriggs/bandageandflannelroll.jpg
Include a roll of dark red felt in your bandage packet.

http://usera.imagecave.com/thesewingacademy/NoahBriggs/Committeeforourwoundedlabelapplied.jpg
A Confederate "Committee For Our Wounded" label. There should be a Star of David on either side of the phrase. My reproduction does not have it. Labels should be printed on off-whit paper.

The Steward's Manual also shows how to roll bandages manually and how to build a bandage roller (preferred).

Don't forget stump bandages, too. If people are going to obssess over the amputations then they should see the consequences. Cut your cloth into an equilateral T-shape and fold up.

Surgical sponges are useful too. Cut a four inch by four inch square of your average cheesecloth from the grocery store. Pile four cottonballs in the middle in a pyramid style. Draw up the four corners of the cheesecloth and secure with a black string. Trim excess cheesecloth. Repeat eleven more times. Keep a list of handy expletives nearby in case you are doing this at the last minute.

http://usera.imagecave.com/thesewingacademy/NoahBriggs/surgicalsponges.jpg

Wrap your dozen sponges in a piece of regular newsprint (minus the print). Hand write with a dip pen "1doz. sponges" and your organization's name (optional).

Try to have fun. Pop Gettysburg in the DVD player and have it for background noise and turn it into a bandage-rolling party with your friends.

ginny74
12-28-2007, 02:19 AM
Thank you very much Mr. Briggs. I have about a thousand yards of muslin, so I think this will work. Plus, I just got Ken Burns's "The Civil War," which will keep us going for many, many hours!:p

chatrbug
12-28-2007, 03:16 AM
Ive been rolling bandages... it takes awhile! You need to make sure you get them good and tight or else they are too bulky. The key is the when you start... bad start then you need to start over. To start I fold over about half an inch, then fold that in half, then fold that in half, until its small enough to start good tight roll. Then you need to pull the loose part with one hand and tightly roll with the other hand. Did I tell you that your hand will be tired after you do a few rolls?

mmartin4600
12-28-2007, 03:34 AM
Include a roll of dark red felt in your bandage packet.

I've never seen this before Noah. What was the purpose? Also thanks for the info on the stump bandage. Always learning new things here.

Michael

NoahBriggs
12-28-2007, 04:14 AM
To snip into custom pieces. The felt was then placed over a wound and held in place with the roller bandage. It absorbed the expected discharge from the wound. It's also easier to change when you make the rounds at the hospital in the morning, in order to put clean dressings on wounds.

I should poke around on Google for a book I remember seeing that was devoted exclusively to bandaging. It provided several examples of bandaging material cut into unorthodox shapes to bind to wounds in hard-to-reach areas. In the meantime the last chapter of the Steward's Manual has (I think) several pages devoted towards basic bandaging other than the usual "mummy wrap method". (That's my expression, not a period one.)

Edited to add: the red backgrounds in my instrument/item photos are the red felt to which I refer. Needless to say the flash makes it look brighter than usual. The red felt also makes a good background when you display instruments. For some reason they look better than on a white table cloth.

I can rummage around my data this evening and post a couple of newspaper articles transcribed by Vicki Betts. The articles are from Texas newspapers. They list various items the Confederate hospitals need, and that's where I got the measurements for the bandages. They also list medicines needed as well. So a good hospital aid box could contain roller bandages, the felt, packaged sponges, suture materials and several bottles/boxes/packets of medicine, all warpped and/or padded with hospital gowns, bedsheets, pillowcases, empty bed tick mattresses, and maybe some munchies for the patients depending on your source and the time of year.

chatrbug
12-28-2007, 06:27 AM
The red felt would be wool, right? Not cotton. What are the dimensions on it?

NoahBriggs
12-28-2007, 07:12 AM
I think what I have is cotton, but I think wool would work better.

I don't know the dimensions of a typical roll. Whatever size packs conveniently into a box. I have a roll onhand, and small squares already cut.

Pvt Peck
12-28-2007, 05:47 PM
I realize from your intial post that you are making bandages for a primarly CS impression but thought you might find this interesting. The following link is to a book that gathered some of the US Sanitary Commissions bulletins into one book. If you use the seaarch function youwill find some neat info on bandages, pattersn for "hospital clothing" such as shirts, underdrawers, arm slings, even slippers! There is a lot of neat stuff in this book, hope it helps in your bandage quest or helps with other ideas of things you could get up to.

http://books.google.com/books?id=4LoHAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA385&dq=US+sanitary+commission+bulletin+13&lr=#PPP1,M1

Edward Parrott

funhistory
12-31-2007, 05:15 AM
"I should poke around on Google for a book I remember seeing that was devoted exclusively to bandaging. It provided several examples of bandaging material cut into unorthodox shapes to bind to wounds in hard-to-reach areas. In the meantime the last chapter of the Steward's Manual has (I think) several pages devoted towards basic bandaging other than the usual "mummy wrap method". (That's my expression, not a period one.)"

Noah's reference may be to F. W. Sargent's "On Bandaging and Other Elements of Minor Surgery", which went through several editions. The spine title appears as "Sargent's Minor Surgery". The CW-era edition was revised to include a new chapter on treating bullet wounds. Sargent includes descriptions of charpie, sutures, rollers, etc., in addition to the proper application of dressings to all parts of the body, including appendages! I found a copy thirty years ago--well before I ever thought that I might need it. Mine is the 1867 edition.

NoahBriggs
12-31-2007, 05:48 AM
Ain't on Google Books.

Pity.

mmartin4600
12-31-2007, 05:49 AM
Is this (http://books.google.com/books?id=2rYNAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=On+Bandaging#PPR15,M1) it?

NoahBriggs
12-31-2007, 09:13 AM
Yup, thanks.

I don't know why my searches come up with diddly. I tried the title I tried the name. It came up with nothing.

funhistory
01-01-2008, 04:48 AM
Yep, you found it! I, too, had tried both title and author several times, but I came up with nothing. Just when I thought that I wouldn't be able to make much of a contribution to the Forum... I'd assumed that you gents would have found this long ago. Enjoy (and please keep sharing your discoveries)! FYI, Sargent also wrote a book on major surgical procedures for which this would have been a companion.

Georgia Parson
02-09-2008, 08:22 PM
Noah and all,
You mentioned articles from Vicki Betts about medicines that Aid Societies or Women's Groups might send along with the kit. Did you ever locate those? I cannot find any reference to the list. It would be helpful to know which ones and in what proportions they need to be packaged. Thanks for help that anyone can offer.

federal musician
02-09-2008, 09:54 PM
On an earlier post in this thread, it said about how a "bandage roller (preferred)" was better than hand rolling bandages.

"The Steward's Manual also shows how to roll bandages manually and how to build a bandage roller (preferred)."

Does anybody made a bandage roller or are there any plans for one or a picture available?


Frank Long

NoahBriggs
02-10-2008, 10:25 AM
Noah and all,
You mentioned articles from Vicki Betts about medicines that Aid Societies or Women's Groups might send along with the kit. Did you ever locate those? I cannot find any reference to the list. It would be helpful to know which ones and in what proportions they need to be packaged. Thanks for help that anyone can offer.

Original Example of a Request -
DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], August 29, 1861, p. 2, c. 3
Medicines for the Army.--An experienced Army Surgeon in Virginia gives the following list of articles much needed by the sick and the wounded. He says:
Such persons as are inclined to do so, can contribute to the necessities of the sick and wounded, should we get into a battle, by making up a box of bandages, and furnishing any amount of almost any kind of medicines. A package of bandages might be made up as follows: Take a piece of coarse, unbleached sheeting from eight to ten yards long, and tear into strips--
1 dozen, 1/2 inch wide,
2 " 2 inches wide
3 " 2 1/2 " "
4 " 3 " "
4 " 4 " "
These should be rolled tightly and the loose end pinned.
Several pounds of tow.
Curved splints of all sorts.
Oil cloths, 20 dozen.
Pillow cases, 2 dozen.
Pillow ticks, 2 dozen.
Sheets, 4 dozen.
[Red] Flannel, a bolt. All are needed.
Should any one take a notion to fit out a box of medicine and hospital stores, the annexed is a list of the articles most needed:
For a Regiment.
Simple Ceraie, [Simple Cerate] 10 pounds.
Basilicon Ointment 5 "
Chloroform, 2 "
Creosote, 6 ounces.
Liquor Ammoniaie, 5 pounds.
Blue Mass, 1 pound.
Morphine 5 drhms.
Spts. Turpentine, 5 gallons.
Sugar of Lead, 2 pounds.
Powd. Gum Arabic, 4 "
" Cayenne Pepper, 1/2 pound.
" Ipicac, [sic] 1 "
Dover's Powder 1 "
Powd. Opium, 2 pounds.
" Mustard, 12 "
Crushed Sugar, 25 "
Spirits of Nitre, 1/2 gallon.
Brandy (good), 24 bottles.
Wine, Port, Madeira, or Sherry, 24 bottles.
Bourbon Whiskey. 24 bottles.
Opium Gum, 2 pounds.
Sabaraque's [sic, should be Labarraque’s] Disinfectant 3 bottles.
Chloride of Lime, 5 pounds.
Seidlitz Powders,
Laudanum, }
Paregoric, }
Es. Peppermint, } Any quantity.
Tinct. Capsicum, }
Liniments, }
Cathartic Pills, }
The foregoing is an imperfect list, but may serve as a sort of guide for any person who may be moved by feelings of benevolence or duty to get up supplies for a regiment.

Sources:

Bethard, Wayne. Lotions, Potions and Deadly Elixirs –Frontier Medicine in America 2004.

Evans, Bruce. A Primer of Civil War Medicine – Non-Surgical Medical Practice During the War Years. 1998 [Author’s personal collection, PDF format.]

Flannery, Michael. Civil War Pharmacy –A History of Drugs, Drug Supply and Provision, and Therapeutics for the Union and Confederacy. 2004.

Daily Chronicle & Sentinel [Augusta, GA], August 29, 1861, p. 2, c. 3. Newspaper Research, 1861-1865 . http://www.uttyl.edu/vbetts/drugs.htm (accessed November 4, 2006).

Georgia Parson
02-10-2008, 02:48 PM
Mr. Briggs,

Many thanks. I guess I just overlooked it.

NoahBriggs
02-10-2008, 02:59 PM
Does anybody made a bandage roller or are there any plans for one or a picture available?

Put "bandage roller" into google books and see what you get.

Frank H, You're welcome. Take the time to browse Mrs. Betts' site and familiarize yourself with it. It's updated and chock full of gold flecks among the quartz drek.

mmartin4600
02-10-2008, 04:45 PM
I have one that was built for me by my Surgeon/Mentor. I can take some pictures and measurements if you want. It doesn't look too complicated. I'm on the road right now so I won't be able to get to it until Monday or Tuesday.

Michael Martin


On an earlier post in this thread, it said about how a "bandage roller (preferred)" was better than hand rolling bandages.

"The Steward's Manual also shows how to roll bandages manually and how to build a bandage roller (preferred)."

Does anybody made a bandage roller or are there any plans for one or a picture available?


Frank Long

38thIndiana
08-25-2008, 11:25 AM
Okay, I reviewed this thread and searched through the Hospital Stewards' Manual, but did not find the answer to this question - were the strips of red felt used to cover wounds rolled up inside the bandage roll itself, or were they rolled up as a separate bundle? Were they even rolled up at all? If they were rolled separately, were the rolls the same length (3-7 yards according to the Steward's manual) as the bandage rolls? Also on the subject of bandage rolls, the pins used to fasten the loose ends, where they anything special ouside a normal 1860s straightpin? I'm just starting anew here in the medical impression, and want to get this right...

Unbleached or bleached muslin for the bandanges?

funhistory
08-25-2008, 06:14 PM
Hello Traie,

I believe that if you seek a copy of Sargent's Minor Surgery on Google Books, you should find the answers that you seek along with instructions. and illustrations for all manner of bandaging and dressing products.

It's my understanding that red flannel yardage was cut into shapes and compressed, which were applied to the wound. The flannel pieces were then held in place by the roller bandage.

I believe that the pins that would have been used would have been the common, yellow brass, straight pin. I don't have my notes in front of me, but I believe that somewhere in a Bulletin of the US Sanitary Commissison, I saw instructions that rollers were to be supplied with two straight pins.

If you have trouble finding the references, please let me know, and I'll pull out my copies and notes.

38thIndiana
08-26-2008, 07:41 PM
thanks for the insight. I browsed through Sargent's last night after receiving your note and found it to be of great help. Now, all I need is someone to practice all the fun and exciting ways of bandages limbs and parts on....

You are correct in saying that the red flannel was cut up into specific shapes and used as compresses, and as far as the bandages go, Sargent was clear in stating many different types of material including flannel, cotton, and linen was used as bandage material. He also specified the use of both unbleached or bleached muslin, so I'm safe with the 21 yards I just ordered from Hancock Fabrics.....and for those who might be needing period correct straight pins, Wooded Hamlet Designs has correct ones in stock.

I have an idea to build a quality period tabletop bandage roller, based on a few illustrations I've seen so far. Doesn't look too complicated. If I produce a couple this winter, do you think anyone in the medical society would be interested in one?

funhistory
08-27-2008, 02:29 PM
Good Lord, Man, twenty-one yards of muslin for bandages? I hope that you're planning to open a dispensary. While I found bandage rolling to be a bit boring, I did enjoy picking old linen to make lint and charpie in its various forms.

I, too, found the brass pins at Wooded Hamlet; however, I wanted to get a larger quantity and at a reduced price per piece. I ordered mine from England after searching for pillow lace-making supplies. The manufacturer (Bohin) is actually a 19th century French factory that is period appropriate and still in operation. Sadly, my weak grasp of French suggested that the factory didn't appear able to sell retail. The UK vendor web site is www.djhornsby.co.uk. It's a family-owned operation. Their price was a bargain for the quantity of pins (hundreds in the box), their service was impecable, and shipping was flawless. I charged the cost to a major credit card, and within a week, I had my order. They were also able to supply black, steel pins that we use for mourning goods.

Have fun rolling!

38thIndiana
08-27-2008, 07:00 PM
I think I'll have enough muslin to roll for bandages the rest of my days....but at 69 cents a yard, I couldn't turn it down. I guess I could start a Christian Commission tent and just give rolls away :D

For home use, I ordered a modern roller from a horse tack supply store for $4.60 (supposed to be used for rolling ace bandages for horses). I still wouldn't mind getting some supplies together to build a period roller. Know of anyone who might make an iron hand crank shaft and handle? I thought of somehow using an old victrola hand crank like the one on my upright phonograph, but the description of the roller in Sargent's calls for one with a tapered end.

I did check out the English pin site, but do you recall the size, in MM's, of the pins you ordered?

MrsArmstrong
08-28-2008, 07:16 AM
Virginia Mescher wrote an article about sewing supplies which included pins. There are pictures of some originals. The pins are 1 1/16th in. long and are "tinned" over the brass. You can get modern pins "silk pins" at most fabric stores.

"The Case of the Lost Thimble"
http://www.raggedsoldier.com/articles.html

My question is how were they pinned? Are there any pictures of originals? I made some rolls by hand and it is hard as a rock and difficult to pin without bending the pin.
Thanks

funhistory
08-28-2008, 11:27 AM
I believe that I ordered the 26mm size, but I can check when I get home if you'd like confirmation of that detail. I measured three historic examples that I have in my personal collection, which I believe were found on CW era garments, and I used those as my guide.

The only differences that I can detect in the historic originals and those that I ordered and am using are the facts that the heads of the originals appear to be more of a small, brass ball shape nearly identical to pins that come inserted these days when one purchases a packaged dress shirt and that the point and taper of the originals is sharper. In response to Mrs. Armstrong's report that tinned pins were used, in my experience in handling original textile collections and CW era garments, I've only seen yellow brass pins that were inserted into the fabric. I only recall what I'd term "plated pins" in situ in garments that I would date later in the century. Given the fact that Bohin, the French manufacturer, was in production during the War, I was comfortable using their product. I hope that it works for you.

I don't have any suggestions regarding the crank for the bandage roller, but I'd guess that if you discussed your project with one of the blacksmiths at a reenactment, he might be able to produce exactly what you need.

hanktrent
08-28-2008, 12:54 PM
In response to Mrs. Armstrong's report that tinned pins were used, in my experience in handling original textile collections and CW era garments, I've only seen yellow brass pins that were inserted into the fabric. I only recall what I'd term "plated pins" in situ in garments that I would date later in the century.

I don't see any indication that tinned brass pins are anachronistic in themselves, unless it can be shown they were only confined to certain uses and not bandages. Check out the google books search here (http://books.google.com/books?lr=&as_brr=0&q=tinned+brass+pins+date%3A0-1865&btnG=Search+Books).

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

MrsArmstrong
08-29-2008, 08:55 AM
Thank you Mr Trent for the google link!
American Medical Monthly and New York Review, 1860
http://tinyurl.com/63gank
Go to pages 359-360

This comes in an section about metals used in pins, tinned brass pins in the following paragraph.
"Tin, from its want of tenactiy, like lead, cannot be drawn sufficienly fine. this objection is easily overcome by tinning brass wire. More than fourty years ago, meeting with the vexation of ulceration from silver pins in hare-lip operations, I had the recourse to common houseold pins, and found the result so favorable that I have ever since employed no other kind.

It mentions "long common pins" futher.
The "silk pins" you can purcase today are 1 1/16th inches long. The same as the ones pictured in the article I refered to earlier. I also have an orginal pin and it also measures 1 1/16th inches. It was holding together a bound series of ladies magazines dated 1863.

funhistory
08-29-2008, 10:51 AM
Hello Traie,

I've confirmed that the brass Bohin pins that I ordered were, in fact, 26 mm long and 0.65 mm in diameter. The box that I ordered from Hornsby's in the UK contained 100 grams (translates to a load of pins).

In "The Sanitary Commission Bulletin" issue number 31 dated 1 Feb 1865, you'll find on page 963 a description of the specs issued by the Commission for producing roller bandages. The reference is contained in an article headed "Cushions for Wounded Limbs". The article also describes lint, cushions, and towels. On the previous page, you'll find specs for hospital bedding items.

38thIndiana
08-29-2008, 01:12 PM
Sweet! Thanks for all the info and help. As soon as I receive the pins, I'll be diving into rolling bandages with both feet. I'll have to post a pic or two once I have one completed. If they pass the authenticity muster, feel free to contact me and I can throw a few rolls your way, if needed.

NukeGuard
09-21-2008, 09:45 PM
Hey all. I don't know how accurate this is, but this is a bandage roller that my friend Dan made. He has two more, and gave this one to me. Dan is the Steward of record for Battery D, 1st MI Light Artillery. I step in from time to time as Steward, and have a lot of bandages rolled and wrapped. Whether this is accurate or not, it makes a great rolled bandage.

Kuhndawg25
08-10-2014, 11:08 PM
Has anyone built any bandage rollers since this post was created and if so, does anyone have any pictures and measurements that they are willing to post and share. I've been slowly building my equipment and any help would be great.

Thanks