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Jas. Cox
11-10-2007, 06:16 PM
Okay, this section has gone sadly quiet. So I will pose a question.

I have been attending meetings of the Southern Indiana Civil War Round Table (Yes, I have been seeing someone behind your backs). They are trying to fill up their 2008 schedule with topics of discussions. I thought a medical perspective would be a good idea and rarely discussed at such groups. This brings up two opportunities (as they like to call problems where I work). 1. I would have to give the talk and I know oh so very little (and have anxiety issues, blah, blah, blah). 2. I would have to come up with the narrow topic. So, let's assume that I am willing to give a talk. If you were to be at such a group, what would be of interest to you concerning civil war medicine? For example, I thought the "Medical Myths" thread was interesting. So, perhaps "Misconceptions of Medical Treatment During the US Civil War ..." with various areas. Medicines, anaesthesia, surgery ....

I'd like to hear other ideas along with the location of resources to do the research. As noted above I know nothing, or very little. Thus this will be a way to force me to learn something myself.

And begin ....

GeorgeWunderlich
11-12-2007, 10:57 AM
I am happy to help you pick a tiopic and do the research. I do talks like this about twice a week for various groups and feel your pain. It is sometimes hard to start from scratch.


I think your medical myths idea is great and easy to fill out into a well rounded program with easy and yet very solid documentation.

If I can be of help, please call me from our website www.civilwarmed.org

George Wunderlich

Marc
11-12-2007, 01:06 PM
Agree with George..I have spoken to a couple PA Roundtables over the years on the Civil War Surgeon Myths and Truths. I always limit the overall talk to 1 hour. 40-45 minutes of my talk and then Q&A. Afterwards the members usually come up to look at my replica and orginal medical artifacts. My main goal is to stir up enough interest they will read up on their own and being close to the Medical Musuem..perhaps a nice day trip for someone.

Take advantage of George's help, it will pay dividends and good luck.

Jas. Cox
11-13-2007, 04:58 PM
I am happy to help you pick a tiopic and do the research. I do talks like this about twice a week for various groups and feel your pain. It is sometimes hard to start from scratch.


I think your medical myths idea is great and easy to fill out into a well rounded program with easy and yet very solid documentation.

If I can be of help, please call me from our website www.civilwarmed.org

George Wunderlich

Thank you for your offer of help. I think the medical myth idea is the best route to go with a general interest audience. I've copied "myths" from the thread previously started. In that, Noah (aka "The Eye of the Tiger") suggests that it could be broken down into three areas:

Physician knowledge
Anesthesia
Instrument mis-identification

Good areas, however, I think for a non-medical oriented group, I'd change them a bit. For example, I don't think Instrument Misidentification would be as interesting or important to such a group. I'm still trying to define my categories. Medicines, Anesthesia and Surgery are what I was originally thinking. However, perhaps surgery should be a broader treatment and anesthesia might go under medicines. Then again, what misconceptions were there about medicines that wouldn't be too esoteric for this broad group?

To review some of the myths listed in the previous thread:

No anaesthesia
Bullet-biting (which would be a result of no anesthesia)
Lopping off limbs whenever possible. (treatment)
Surgeons were stupid because they didn't sterilize their instruments, wash their hands, use modern medicines, etc. or Surgeons and doctors were uneducated/apethetic. They had no idea of anatomy and knew nothing about the body (treatment)
There were female nurses in the field (not sure of the category)
Misidentification of surgical tools accidently or on purpose (area I probably wouldn't cover in this particular talk)

This will take more pondering.

cwdoc45
11-16-2007, 12:07 AM
Send me an e-mail & I'll send you my powerpoint from Reeenactor Fest II in Chicago last year about portraying a CW surgeon as a reenactor. :D

Jas. Cox
11-19-2007, 03:55 PM
Send me an e-mail & I'll send you my powerpoint from Reeenactor Fest II in Chicago last year about portraying a CW surgeon as a reenactor. :D

I don't know if you received it, but I did send you and e-mail via whatever you have listed on this site. I'd like to look at it. Thank you for the offer.

Jas. Cox
11-19-2007, 03:56 PM
I am happy to help you pick a tiopic and do the research. I do talks like this about twice a week for various groups and feel your pain. It is sometimes hard to start from scratch.


I think your medical myths idea is great and easy to fill out into a well rounded program with easy and yet very solid documentation.

If I can be of help, please call me from our website www.civilwarmed.org

George Wunderlich

There was no e-mail listed for you on this site, so I sent you a private message. I appreciate your consultation and input.

Jas. Cox
12-06-2007, 02:25 PM
Or at least I need to be. I signed on to give a talk on medical myths for the Southern Indiana Civil War Round Table Group in March. So now I actually have to come up with a presentation. That gives me a few months to procrastinate. :eek:

Jas. Cox
03-24-2008, 10:17 AM
Well, I gave my little talk. With questions, the presentation seemed to be about an hour long. I was pleased and the audience seemed to enjoy it. No one there had really studied anything medical related, so no one to tell me if I was wrong. If they asked a question to which I didn't know an answer, I just said, "I have no idea."

My three myths were:

1. Physicians had a total lack of modern medical knowledge (i.e. were incompetent)

2. Doctors used amputation for everything (Amputation Crazy).

3. There was no anesthesia (Just bullet biting and whisky) [and yes this included somewhat debunking the "pain bullet" legend.]

NoahBriggs
03-24-2008, 09:42 PM
Good to hear it was a success!

File that speech away in your mind. You will need it - again and again and again . . . ;)

Jas. Cox
03-25-2008, 12:52 AM
Good to hear it was a success!

File that speech away in your mind. You will need it - again and again and again . . . ;)

Thanks. I have it on note cards and on the computer.

Abrams
03-25-2008, 07:41 AM
I am glad your public speaking went well.

Most people would rather eat a bug than get up in front of others and speak. Kudos for having the guts and gumption to do it.

Jas. Cox
03-25-2008, 02:52 PM
I am glad your public speaking went well.

Most people would rather eat a bug than get up in front of others and speak. Kudos for having the guts and gumption to do it.

I could have eaten a bug and gotten out of it?! Darn. ;)

Thanks. It wasn't too bad for me. I'd been more comfortable if I had know the subject better. But it's all about learning and often learning comes from teaching.