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Rob
11-04-2007, 01:20 AM
From the Syracuse New Times:


Target Practice

A Civil War re-enactor in South Carolina was wounded during the Battle of Anderson County, even though the participants were firing blanks.

Stewart Lambert, a Confederate cavalryman with the Laurens Orphans, suffered a gunpowder burn to his leg and a cut that required stitches. Frank Stegall said he was a few feet away and saw Lambert's pistol shoot when Lambert holstered it. The re-enactment resumed after an ambulance removed Lambert from the battlefield.

In the original skirmish on May 1, 1865, there were no Confederate casualties.

flattop32355
11-04-2007, 09:44 AM
Do self-inflicted wounds count?

Poor Private
11-04-2007, 12:19 PM
#1 rule always leave your hammer on an empty cylinder!
It is amazing with all the instruction on the propler use of Rifled Musket, Carbine, or Rifle, I have never ever seen any instruction at events on the proper use and handling of a pistol.
And yes I hear you, they were not used that much and only officers are allowed to carry at events (infantry). But have these officers been instructed in the proper use? I see so many people pulling and firing them that need a swift kick in the A** because of unsafe conditions.
Has the cav units been instructed? Who instructs them?

reb64
11-04-2007, 03:51 PM
knowing the embarrassement, insurance etc. i would have dressed the wound myself and played it off and been more careful next time.

tompritchett
11-05-2007, 12:20 AM
I take it you have never seen someone shot at close range with black powder. I have and it is not something that you just dress yourself and carry on. In my case, I escaped very serious injury to the face because the barrel of the pistol was about 12 inches below my face and pointed away from me. The person next to me was not so lucky and received 2nd and 3rd degree burns. The blast injected still burning black powder particles through his clothes and then propelled them (the particles as well as small fragment of burning cloth) through his skin and into the underlying tissue. It is my understanding that over the next 6 months or longer, the doctors still had to perform out-patient surgery to remove particles and dead scar tissue.

Yes, the person that was shot next to me was sent to the Emergency Room that day and was back in camp that night. But it took him well over a year to actually recover from the accident. But then we all know that Rambo would continue on with his arm amputated and his back broken. Right.

CheeseBoxRaft
11-05-2007, 12:21 PM
knowing the embarrassement, insurance etc. i would have dressed the wound myself and played it off and been more careful next time. Hmmmm... this reminded me of character actor Jay C. Flippen. He hurt his leg on a car door back in the 1960s, a minor scrape, but never went to the doctor; he just treated it himself. Gangrene set in and he had to have the leg amputated! :shock: Do what your Mamma taught you and go to the doctor! :D


- John Steadman

sbl
11-05-2007, 12:58 PM
"Do what your Mamma taught you and go to the doctor!"

Maybe his folks were the ones who said "walk it off!"

tompritchett
11-05-2007, 01:17 PM
Maybe his folks were the ones who said "walk it off!"

While you may very well be right (fathers and older brothers can be that way sometimes) such a response would have been because they had never seen a wound caused by a close-up blast of black powder. Usually the situations that cause such wounds are something that most of us most of us will laugh at (as is the case here) but is typically not funny to the woundee until considerably later until after he or she is fully healed.

sbl
11-05-2007, 01:27 PM
"not funny to the woundee"

ROMEO
"He jests at scars that never felt a wound."

Thomas,

I've seen and had some close calls in the last 30 years and "bravado" was sometimes a factor.

Rob Weaver
11-05-2007, 04:45 PM
"If your brother-in-law's last words were 'Hey guys, watch this...' you could be a red-neck."
That is both a painful and embarassing wound, but not uncommon. In the days when men carried revolvers regularly, men were always shooting themselves in the foot while drawing them, shooting themselves in the leg from accidental discharge, etc. Worse, carrying a pocket pistol in one of those pockets in your frock tails could land a Forrest Gump-like wound.

Jas. Cox
11-05-2007, 05:28 PM
Which should make all take a moment to think about the "real" wounded during the war. If a black powder encounter alone can be so painful and require a year of recovery, think about a Miniť ball through a bone or in a gut. Then left on the battle field for hours or days.

Okay, that comes off as a little sanctimonious and morbid.

CheeseBoxRaft
11-06-2007, 03:02 PM
Which should make all take a moment to think about the "real" wounded during the war. If a black powder encounter alone can be so painful and require a year of recovery, think about a Miniť ball through a bone or in a gut. Then left on the battle field for hours or days.

Okay, that comes off as a little sanctimonious and morbid. Neither sanctimonious or morbid - just honest. You have spoken what was the harsh reality for many soldiers. Lots of fascinating accounts out there about the plight of the wounded and their "battle after the battle." Among them:

Fallen Soldier: Memoir of a Civil War Casualty by Andrew Roy

Out of the Wilderness: The Civil War Memoir of Corporal Norton C. Shepard 146th New York Volunteer Infantry

My Life in the Irish Brigade: The Civil War Memoirs of Private William McCarter, 116th Pennsylvania Infantry

Soldiering: by Rice C. Bull

Three out of the four soldiers above were so badly wounded they could not return to duty and spent the rest of their lives in great pain. Three out of the four also languished behind enemy lines for days before receiving any formal medical treatment. Yet, none of these memoirs is what you would call morbid. :D

- John Steadman

Rob Weaver
11-07-2007, 09:49 AM
My hero Will Ray was profoundly affected by the repeated head wounds he suffered during the war, and they contributed to his death after the war. Remember that in those days, even wounds which today would be considered minor could easily turn septic and kill you. (Which president's son died from a cut on his hand? Harrison? Fillmore? I disremember.) Furthermore, recuperative medicine stressed bedrest, so a man recovering would be weakened tremendously by the experience of recovery. It took Rice Bull the rest of 1863 to get over his Chancellorsville wound. (Of course, then there's the great description of trying to catch up with his regiment afterwards.) Gettin' hurt is serious business.

CheeseBoxRaft
11-11-2007, 08:21 PM
Gettin' hurt is serious business. Sure is. I was recently reminded of this a few days ago when I was, for the first time, going down into the Dante-like pit that is Dupont Circle's metro station. (A more vertigo-inducing escalator you may never find.) I looked up and was surprised to see this qoute from Walt Whitman's "The Wound-Dresser" chiseled around the open mouth of that great wound in the ground:

Thus in silence in dreams' projections,

Returning, resuming, I thread my way through the hospitals;

The hurt and wounded I pacify with soothing hand,

I sit by the restless all dark night - some are so young;

Some suffer so much - I recall the experience sweet and sad...

- Walt Whitman, from Leaves of Grass, 1876

Rob Weaver
11-12-2007, 11:25 PM
Oh, my - I've been there dozens of times. Why have I never seen that?

RWelker
11-13-2007, 12:06 PM
Oh, my - I've been there dozens of times. Why have I never seen that?

That's what I thought too.

flattop32355
11-13-2007, 05:19 PM
Sometimes one must look up instead of forward...

Sounds real philosophical, don't it!

Parault
11-13-2007, 08:20 PM
"Do what your Mamma taught you and go to the doctor!"

My Momma taught me to always wear clean underwear

jthlmnn
11-13-2007, 10:13 PM
"Do what your Mamma taught you and go to the doctor!"

My Momma taught me to always wear clean underwear

"Semper ubi sub ubi" Gnoscus Nihilus

CheeseBoxRaft
11-16-2007, 02:00 PM
Oh, my - I've been there dozens of times. Why have I never seen that? The quote hasn't been there very long; only since July of 2007. Not to disappoint anyone, but it was put there not as a reminder of the Civil War, but as a tribute to caregivers of people suffering from HIV/AIDS. However, I immediately thought of all the hospitals in DC during the war.

Link: http://annemarchand.blogspot.com/2007/07/quote-by-walt-whitman-inscribed-outside.html

Ol' Uncle Walty was a strange guy, but a dang fine poet!

- John Steadman