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jerryeberg
10-07-2007, 04:48 PM
I'd like to start my Civil War club meetings with comedy shorts related to the Civil War. I know of 2 Three-Stooges shorts: Uncivil Warriors and Uncivil Warbirds, and one bugs bunny short. Do you know any more?

Pete K
10-08-2007, 11:24 AM
Some sit-coms used Civil War re-enacting as themes, the Simpsons, South Park, Everybody Loves Raymond, Ellen DeGenneres("Ellen"show) are a few I remember. Raymond and Ellen did not really show us as "kooks" but in mostly a favorable light... CSI and Psych went in a differnt tangent.

sbl
10-08-2007, 12:24 PM
Jeff Foxworthy's sit-com had a reenactment plot too.

The other comedies had "fun" with reenactors. Ellen's was the least favorable. He General Lee was the Chinese Car Dealer in the group.
Ray's mother made comments about what Frank's Civil War buddies did in the woods. "You should see what the Southern guys do." He answered.

Ken
10-08-2007, 04:50 PM
I'd like to start my Civil War club meetings with comedy shorts related to the Civil War. I know of 2 Three-Stooges shorts: Uncivil Warriors and Uncivil Warbirds, and one bugs bunny short. Do you know any more?
For us older folk, there was an episode of the Abbott and Costello TV show in which they do a play about the Civil War. Sid Fields, the land lord plays a Confederate Colonel who is reviewing his map with his subordinates and Lou Costello, covered in flour, pretends to be a Confederate orderly serving coffee who is spying on the meeting. The Colonel says we will follow this road through Pimlico. To which Costello replies on no Colonel you can't march through Pimlico. To which the Colonel responds why not my good man. To which Costello replies because the horses are running at Pimlico. I know it pretty corney Burlesque stuff but every time I watch it, it cracks me up. By the way I have the CD of this episode. I think this sketch is very similar to the one done by the Three Stooges.

sbl
10-09-2007, 10:14 AM
Don't forget...

""The Red Badge of Gayness" is episode 45 of Comedy Central's animated series South Park. It originally aired on November 24, 1999."

ILYankee5
10-09-2007, 10:41 AM
Red Skeltons Southern Yankee is a great one. It is not so much about reenactments, but a hilarious film in general.

ILYankee5

sbl
10-09-2007, 12:02 PM
"Col. Clifford M. Baker: The paper's in the pocket of the boot with the buckle. The map's in the packet in the pocket of the jacket. Understand?
Aubrey Filmore: Hmm?
Col. Clifford M. Baker: And if you get them mixed up, you're a dead goose.
Aubrey Filmore: Oh, well let's see now. The paper's in the pocket of the macket with a jacket, and the . . No, I see, the packet's in the . .

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Col. Weatherby: Now, if you don't mind, the map, if you please.
Aubrey Filmore: Oh, the map, the map, the map . .
[to himself]
Aubrey Filmore: The map's in the packle of the bucket with the jeckle. No, the jacket's in the buckle of the pocket with the poodle - the boodle.
Col. Weatherby: Major Drummond, the map!
Aubrey Filmore: Yes, the map, the map, the map . .
[to himself]
Aubrey Filmore: The map's in the packle of the bugle with the pickle. No, no. The pocket of the boo - with the bagel. Not the bagel, the bugle, er, the buckle
[aloud]
Aubrey Filmore: That's it, the boot with the buckle.
[He hands over the wrong document]
Aubrey Filmore: I always carry my secret papers in the boot with the buckle. They'd have to kill me to get it, Sir. A soldier always dies with his bookles on, er, his bagels buckled, er, his . . Nice pair of shoes, don't you think? "

In the movie some black children over hear this conversation and start dancing to it. (It was 1948!)

sbl
10-09-2007, 01:58 PM
This pre-dated The Court Jester 1955


"Hawkins: I've got it! I've got it! The pellet with the poison's in the vessel with the pestle; the chalice from the palace has the brew that is true! Right?
Griselda: Right. But there's been a change: they broke the chalice from the palace!
Hawkins: They *broke* the chalice from the palace?
Griselda: And replaced it with a flagon.
Hawkins: A flagon...?
Griselda: With the figure of a dragon.
Hawkins: Flagon with a dragon.
Griselda: Right.
Hawkins: But did you put the pellet with the poison in the vessel with the pestle?
Griselda: No! The pellet with the poison's in the flagon with the dragon! The vessel with the pestle has the brew that is true!
Hawkins: The pellet with the poison's in the flagon with the dragon; the vessel with the pestle has the brew that is true.
Griselda: Just remember that."

ILYankee5
10-09-2007, 03:49 PM
Those are two of my favorite all time comedians!!

Poor Private
10-09-2007, 09:21 PM
I remeber an old catoon with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam in different forts firing at each other then swapping forts at some time or other. Bugs started out yankee and Sam reb

sbl
10-09-2007, 09:44 PM
"Bugs started out yankee and Sam reb"

The plot got recycled with Bugs a minuteman and Sam as a Hessian.

http://jkretzer3312.files.wordpress.com/2007/03/sam-von-schmamm.jpg

jerryeberg
01-25-2008, 12:49 AM
If anyone's interested in this old post, Cartoon Network's show "Time Squad" did a Dishonest Abe episode. You can find it on video.google.com

Filthy_Confederate_Scum
01-25-2008, 08:35 AM
I remeber an old catoon with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam in different forts firing at each other then swapping forts at some time or other. Bugs started out yankee and Sam rebThat's not a Civil War episode but deals with the Revolutionary War. It's called "Bunker Hill Bunny" and first appeared in September 1950. Details: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunker_Hill_Bunny

The one and only Civil War-themed Bugs Bunny cartoon is called "Southern Fried Rabbit" (the funniest part is my signature quote.) Details: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Fried_Rabbit

Containing what some thought was a negative racial stereotype, "Southern Fried Rabbit" has not been broadcast in un-edited form in the U.S. for decades. But now you can see it in all its uncensored glory at YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mdj8CQEvUqg

And when your done watching it, enjoy it's companion piece entitled "Hillbilly Hare": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eg_wc8CjmtE

sbl
01-25-2008, 10:17 AM
When they used to have Warner Bros. stores with Warner Bros cartoon "gear", I asked for a Yosemite Sam T-shirt with Sam as the Hessian or the Reb. The didn't think of Sam as a subject for mass appeal.

It seems older stouter ladies are big buyers of shirts with Tweedy, Hence are marketed to.

Word is that Sam is a gay icon.

Filthy_Confederate_Scum
01-25-2008, 04:23 PM
Word is that Sam is a gay icon. Com'ere cutie pie. Give ol' Sam a kiss. :rolleyes:

Actually, Bugs has been a gay icon since before I was born. Ever notice how often he cross-dresses? Read all about it: http://www.geocities.com/KarenSpecial/bugs.html

tompritchett
01-25-2008, 04:36 PM
Actually, Bugs has been a gay icon since before the term gay was commonplace. Ever notice how often he cross-dresses? Read all about it: http://www.geocities.com/KarenSpecial/bugs.html

Now you have done it - the website has temporarily exceeded its data transfer limit. BTW, what do that mean about Uncle Miltie?

Filthy_Confederate_Scum
01-25-2008, 04:48 PM
Now you have done it - the website has temporarily exceeded its data transfer limit. Hmmmm.... link to a cross-dressing Bugs Bunny site and the entire forum membership makes a run at it. Well, maybe not so odd. All reenactors play "dress-up" for fun.

OK... changing the subject slightly:

Has anyone ever noticed that Civil War historian James I. Robertson, Jr. sounds just like Elmer Fudd when he talks?

http://www.civilwar.vt.edu/images/Robertson2.jpg
"There's something scwewy awound here."

BlacknBlue1864
01-25-2008, 05:18 PM
Southern Fried Rabbit references the Chattanooga Lookouts, at one time the world's most famous minor leage baseball team because they were the first to have a woman in the lineup.

On April 2, 1931, during an exhibition game between the Chattanooga Lookouts and the New York Yankees Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig were both stuck out by a 17-year-old girl named Virnett Beatrice “Jackie” Mitchell, the first woman to ever play baseball under a professional contract. The next day Baseball Commissioner Judge "Kenesaw Mountain" Landis voided her contract claiming baseball was too strenuous for women. After a short career as a stunt player (she once pitched a game from the back of a donkey) she retired at the age of 23 and later got married. She died in 1987 all but forgotten by history.

http://www.baseball-fever.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=20810&stc=1&d=1173227405

tompritchett
01-25-2008, 05:42 PM
Hmmmm.... link to a cross-dressing Bugs Bunny site and the entire forum membership makes a run at it. Well, maybe not so odd. All reenactors play "dress-up" for fun.

You are probably right. But what about Uncle Miltie???

Filthy_Confederate_Scum
01-25-2008, 06:51 PM
You are probably right. But what about Uncle Miltie??? Clue me in, Tom because I have no idea what you're talking about.

Che
01-25-2008, 07:46 PM
Although not Civil War, Yankee Doodle Bugs is worth a watch:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v01nyUSw4j4&feature=related

George Washington: "Gadzookes! I've been drafted! Martha, you'll have to mind the candy stores alone while I'm off to fight the war!"

tompritchett
01-26-2008, 01:44 AM
Clue me in, Tom because I have no idea what you're talking about.

Milton Berle, probably the originator of dressing in drag for comedy. To his TV fans he was also known as Uncle Miltie. Since he was one of the pioneers of the TV comedy shows, he may have been before your time; he was almost before mine. I am surprised that some of the other "Old F*rts" on this forum had not already commented on him.

sbl
01-26-2008, 07:34 AM
The "boys" might be familiar with Benny Hill. Milton Berle's drag was grotesque of women while Benny's drag was a tribute to women. Bugs Bunny's drag and his kissing of Elmer and Sam was a non-violent way of "castrating" his enemies.
Benny's drag went waaaaaay back to British "Panto" plays that had a "dame" in drag and a "hero" female in "male" costume with tights.

BTW, see D!ck Van Dyke's film The Comic (1969)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0064179/

Which has a silent movie scene set in the Civil War. D!ck is in drag as a "Belle" while his girl friend is in drag as a Union soldier.

The scene ends with D!ck tearing off her uniform which will satisfy the No women in ranks folks :)

(The software edits ****)

Poor Private
01-26-2008, 09:46 AM
My Bad, your right it wasn't civil war with Bugs, and Sam. Still dang funny tho!!

Gary
01-26-2008, 05:17 PM
A hearty thank you Filthy_Confederate_Scum for sharing that link to Southern Fried Rabbit. I've never seen before.

Filthy_Confederate_Scum
01-26-2008, 07:25 PM
A hearty thank you Filthy_Confederate_Scum for sharing that link to Southern Fried Rabbit. I've never seen before. I recommend all reenactors watch it on a weekly basis to prevent them from taking the hobby too seriously.
Milton Berle, probably the originator of dressing in drag for comedy. To his TV fans he was also known as Uncle Miltie. Since he was one of the pioneers of the TV comedy shows, he may have been before your time; he was almost before mine. I am surprised that some of the other "Old F*rts" on this forum had not already commented on him.O I C. Bearle was a bit before my time. But I do recall the drag skits of Monty Python. Wait a minute... how did we get on the topic of drag queens? Oh, that's right... Da bunny from Brooklyn. What's Opera, Doc? is the ultimate Bugs in drag skit. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbSQZNMr7XI