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uozumi
08-01-2007, 06:12 PM
Does anyone know of any good Internet sites or books on Civil War etiquette and manners? I wish to improve my impression and I think these are much needed. I would be much obliged if anyone could post the sites they know of or even just list the manners they can think of. Thank you.

~Steph

bizzilizzit
08-02-2007, 09:16 AM
Does anyone know of any good Internet sites or books on Civil War etiquette and manners? I wish to improve my impression and I think these are much needed. I would be much obliged if anyone could post the sites they know of or even just list the manners they can think of. Thank you.

~Steph

I'm reading a great book on this subject titled RUDENESS & CIVILITY. Manners in Nineteenth-Century Urban America by John F. Kasson

Elizabeth Topping

EFA
08-02-2007, 11:37 AM
http://home.earthlink.net/%7Egchristen/Etiquette.html

crowley_greene
08-02-2007, 02:59 PM
A book that I have found to be *excellent* is "Civil War Era Etiquette -- Martine's Handbook & Vulgarisms in Conversation." ISBN 0-914046. I think I bought my copy in 2003 at the Chickamauga NMP bookstore for $14.95, but I believe that Bob Sullivan Press may also have it (?).

I've referred to places in the book from time to time over the past four years.

Murray Therrell

mmescher
08-02-2007, 05:36 PM
If you visit the website for Ragged Soldier Sutlery (raggedsoldier.com), there are two etiquette books. If you go to the menu item "Books: 19th Century Reproductions", you will go to a listing of books in alphabetical order. There is a _Beadle's Dime Book of Practical Etiquette_ and _Martine's Hand-Book of Etiquette and Guide to True Politeness_.

Michael Mescher

bizzilizzit
08-02-2007, 08:14 PM
Does anyone know of any good Internet sites or books on Civil War etiquette and manners? I wish to improve my impression and I think these are much needed. I would be much obliged if anyone could post the sites they know of or even just list the manners they can think of. Thank you.

~Steph

http://www.assumption.edu/whw/old/Thornwell_Lady's_Guide.html

I have this book, The Lady's Guide to Perfect Gentility published 1860 and written by Emily Thornwell. The above is a link to excepts from that book.
Elizabeth

and the Gentlemen's Guide:

http://www.archive.org/details/theamericangentl00luneuoft

Delia Godric
08-04-2007, 01:41 PM
This is my list:
http://www.geocities.com/shadowofthesundial/EtiquetteandMannersResources.pdf

Side question - Does anyone know why my site stats counter on my Geocities site reset all by itself? If so, can you PM me?

Anna Worden

uozumi
08-04-2007, 08:16 PM
Thanks everyone. I'm going to have to look all of those up.

Linda Trent
08-04-2007, 08:28 PM
Here I go on my little rant again. :rolleyes: Also, remember that reading between the lines in etiquette books can tell you more about what the common man (or woman) was doing, as it can what the upper crust and their wannabes were supposed to be doing.

Just a quick flip through The Ladies Book of Etiquette, Fashion and Manual of Politeness, 1860:


Many ladies, moving, too, in good society, will affect a forward, bold manner, very disagreeable to persons of sense! They will tell of their wondrous feats, when engaged in pursuits only suited for men; they will converse in a loud, boisterous tone; laugh loudly; sing comic songs, or dashing bravuras in a style only fit for the stage or a gentleman's after-dinner party; they will lay wagers...

p. 149 Or p. 146


"Politeness is not hypocrisy: -- cold-heartedness, or unkindness in disguise. There are persons who can smile upon a victim, and talk smoothly, while they injure, deceive, or betray. And they will take credit to themselves, that all has been done with the utmost politeness, that every tone, look and action, has been in perfect keeping with the rules of good breeding."


"Do not pour coffee or tea from your cup into your saucer, and do not blow either these or soup. Wait until they are cool."

Why tell people not to do something if no one does it? My personal feeling is that people were doing what the upper tier were being told not to do.

I think that there's too much portraying of the elite few and not enough portrayals of the everyday common labor class at events. But then that's just my opinion. :-P

Linda.

Miss Elodie
08-06-2007, 06:31 AM
Good morning,

My favorite work, "Miss Leslie's Behavior Book" published in 1853, is now available online here:

http://www.merrycoz.org/voices/behavior/BEHAVE01.HTM

Miss Leslie's work is geared toward very ordinary folks who need basic instruction further supporting the remarks by Mrs. Trent and others that nowhere near as many people of the mid-Nineteenth century were familiar with etiquette standards as is often assumed.

Best of luck with your research,

Jennifer Payne

Bill_Cross
01-23-2012, 03:23 PM
Bump this thread, with a shout-out for the Martine Handbook.