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cwcav3tn
06-02-2007, 07:29 AM
Iam attempting to make wooden tent poles for a fly and a A frame tent.

Anyone have some ideas,

Lt. Kevin Wright
3rd Tn

jgr1974
06-02-2007, 10:37 AM
I have used a 2x2 post with a steel pin in the top for years The work great. The shorter side poles you can use a nail. I leave these square, but I have seen some people who have plain the four corners down to make an octagon post. The look really neat, but to much time for me!!!

Hope this helps!!!

The Mad Mick!!!

reddcorp
06-02-2007, 11:07 AM
For A-frame:

I used 2x2's untreated pine for the uprights, with a large landscape nail (head cut off). You may wish to put on a coat of clear varnish.
For the ridgepole, I use two 2x2's trimmed at the ends to fit into a short (24 to 30") square metal tube sleeve. This makes transporting easier.

For the tent fly, I suggest the same type of ridgepole as the tent, but use 2-3" saplings for upright and 1-1 1/2" saplings for the outriggers. Use the large landscape nail for the uprights and 2 square nail for the outrigger tops.
If you get lucky, you may find saplings with a Y at the top for the uprights, thus no nails needed.

My next project is to make octagonal shaped uprights...they just look better, but require more work. You really need a table saw and larger stock wood to start with.

Good Luck.

Andy Redd

cblodg
06-02-2007, 01:08 PM
Iam attempting to make wooden tent poles for a fly and a A frame tent.

Anyone have some ideas,

Lt. Kevin Wright
3rd Tn

I'd check out their "How to" section of their site. It's pretty informative as to pole lengths and materials. Here is the link:

https://www.regtqm.com/how_to.htm

Chris

cwcav3tn
06-02-2007, 01:28 PM
Thanks All, I have work to do !!!!!!!!!!!!!

Lt. K. Wright
3rd Tn Cavalry Co C

bill watson
06-03-2007, 08:53 AM
What kinds of poles do you see in period photographs of tents?

Do any of them look like dimensional lumber from the Home Depot?

RJSamp
06-03-2007, 10:18 AM
What kinds of poles do you see in period photographs of tents?

Do any of them look like dimensional lumber from the Home Depot?

Have seen 'em four ways (so far..)
1. no supports other than trees/wagons/artillery pieces/building/fence.

2. 3"+ round straight trunks with the bark still on 'em

3. rough hewn lumber....they knew how to work wood back then, including building entire houses with only a few nails. Theirs a good picture of one of these with a big fly over it and the men are bellying up to the sutlers for a drink of 'sasparilla'.

Fence rails fit into this category nicely

4. smooth sided 'dimensional' lumber like you find at Lowe's. Back then a 2 x 4 was a 2 x 4....not some 1.3 x 3.25" Southern Yellow pine curvy slat. A couple of slats together from the side of a house or barn would do nicely for an upright. Like the impromptu bread ovens that were built/pressed into service...lumber mills were quickly pressed into service to plank up a RR bridge, cordorouy a road, build winter quarters, erect stables.

The regulation painted hex uprights show up frequently in hospital tent pictures....that would be dimensional lumber.


I think many of us are loath to strip our back yards, battlefields, event sites of straight limbs/trees....or perfect sized shelter half fork uprights....which is why we use dimensional lumber.....and wouldn't be surprised if their wasn't a business opportunity here.....bring in some pine posts and uprights and either rent for the weekend (green poles could be dried out and used for firewood at a later time) or sell them Maybe we can go up on Big Round Top for G145 and start making poles?

Don't know what to do about air travel or 1,000+ miles in a car/SUV with 14' ridge poles Bill.....other than break them down with some joining mechanism (which they probably didn't do).

How'd we do at Jim Butler's Shiloh NMP LH with all of the Sibley's? Did we hex out some straight 5" ash tree poles x 18' long onsite? Our resident wood shopper used a table saw to hex out a three sectioned Sibley pole...used Iron plates to join the sections with bolts.....now he can take his Sibley to events in his Twin Engined light plane.

Speaking of Agent Orange/Home Depot..... the lumber business is going to a mountainsie with your Georgia Pacific rep and bidding on a couple of million board feet to be delivered two years from now.....anything less is just sticks.

hanktrent
06-03-2007, 12:30 PM
Back then a 2 x 4 was a 2 x 4....not some 1.3 x 3.25" Southern Yellow pine curvy slat.

For what it's worth, the way to purchase dimensional lumber that's full size, is to do it the same way they did, after it comes from a sawmill, not a planing mill. Sometimes sawmills will sell in small quantities, sometimes not, but where that extra size gets lost is when the lumber gets planed down from its original dimensions. Some is also lost when the lumber dries.

Most people today, of course, want their wood already planed and kiln dried by someone else, so that's how hardware stores sell it. If you go to a sawmill, where the logs are sitting at one end, there's a pile of sawdust, and the boards are sitting at the other, you can purchase green rough-cut lumber that's actually 2" x 4" or whatever.

If you want to plane it lightly by hand, not much thickness will be lost. The shrinkage when it dries will just depend on the type of wood, and other factors. But that's what "they" would have faced also.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

vamick
06-04-2007, 08:36 AM
For A-frame:


My next project is to make octagonal shaped uprights...they just look better, but require more work. You really need a table saw and larger stock wood to start with.

Good Luck.

Andy Redd

Andy the ones I have are old surplus medical tent ( MASH?) HDQT ect, they are octogon and have a good strong metal banded end tip for the ridge, ya might find those surplus and trim em to size ect, also they have been made two piece with a sleave in the middle...WATCH OUT for splinters, these things can send a 3 incher in yer hand quick as lightnin:confused:

reddcorp
06-04-2007, 01:19 PM
Thanks,

A pard has a pair of those, but I've not been able to locate any to date, so I thought I'd try my hand at making some....something to do during the summer break.

Andy Redd

vamick
06-04-2007, 02:21 PM
Have seen 'em four ways (so far..)
1. no supports other than trees/wagons/artillery pieces/building/fence.

2. 3"+ round straight trunks with the bark still on 'em

3. rough hewn lumber....they knew how to work wood back then, including building entire houses with only a few nails. Theirs a good picture of one of these with a big fly over it and the men are bellying up to the sutlers for a drink of 'sasparilla'.

Fence rails fit into this category nicely

4. smooth sided 'dimensional' lumber like you find at Lowe's. Back then a 2 x 4 was a 2 x 4....not some 1.3 x 3.25" Southern Yellow pine curvy slat. A couple of slats together from the side of a house or barn would do nicely for an upright. Like the impromptu bread ovens that were built/pressed into service...lumber mills were quickly pressed into service to plank up a RR bridge, cordorouy a road, build winter quarters, erect stables.

The regulation painted hex uprights show up frequently in hospital tent pictures....that would be dimensional lumber.


I think many of us are loath to strip our back yards, battlefields, event sites of straight limbs/trees....or perfect sized shelter half fork uprights....which is why we use dimensional lumber.....and wouldn't be surprised if their wasn't a business opportunity here.....bring in some pine posts and uprights and either rent for the weekend (green poles could be dried out and used for firewood at a later time) or sell them Maybe we can go up on Big Round Top for G145 and start making poles?

Don't know what to do about air travel or 1,000+ miles in a car/SUV with 14' ridge poles Bill.....other than break them down with some joining mechanism (which they probably didn't do).

How'd we do at Jim Butler's Shiloh NMP LH with all of the Sibley's? Did we hex out some straight 5" ash tree poles x 18' long onsite? Our resident wood shopper used a table saw to hex out a three sectioned Sibley pole...used Iron plates to join the sections with bolts.....now he can take his Sibley to events in his Twin Engined light plane.

Speaking of Agent Orange/Home Depot..... the lumber business is going to a mountainsie with your Georgia Pacific rep and bidding on a couple of million board feet to be delivered two years from now.....anything less is just sticks.


NOW the strangest thing Ive ever seen in a period photograph is from some unpublished photos of a field hospital near/after Sharpsburg, these were in a CWTimes of a few years ago havent got it near at the moment but do have it. I.ll check the issue date..anyhow..... if you zoom in/look closely at the rope tighteners for their wall tents..instead of being meerly rectangler blocks of wood with holes ect..they are figure eight shaped!, yep!..somebody took the time/effort to shape these which would have done fine service simply, well, square blocked for want of a mathmaticaly better descriptor!..blew my mind that was done..why?? was there some mechanical advantage to a fig 8?? I cant see any..???? one answer may be..then craftsmen..no CRAFTSMEN did their best work that suited them..?? other than that Im clueless..anybody know the pic s Im speakin of??

GrumpyDave
06-04-2007, 05:15 PM
There's also existing photos of metal rope tensioners. I don't recollect which but some sutler offered them some time back.

If it's not going to rain, why put up a tent? Wait...:rolleyes: Yes, RJ, static camp, lots of tents. Yes, correct. Camp Bivouac tomato toomaato, lets call the whole thing off....!LOL