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"Doc" Nelson
05-23-2007, 07:32 PM
Well, it seems that all of us (within the medical community of the hobby) are constantly looking to recruit more members. Or, are hurting for a good number to, somewhat, accurately portray a proper medical staff while in the field or, whatever event we attend.

May I make a suggestion? Would it be something to consider, to maybe put out events that each of us are planning on attending. To see if someone from within the "medical community" could or would like to attend. It also provides a great opportunity for each of us to meet in person and, have a chance to expand our aspect of the hobby. There doesn't seem to be too terribly many of "us" :(.

I don't know . . it was just a thought. Any ideas, thoughts, suggestions or insight that you may have . . please feel free to "chime in" :D.

Thanks for taking the time to read. I'm looking forward to hearing what each of us thinks or wishes to say ;).

NoahBriggs
05-23-2007, 08:06 PM
I have posted a standing "help wanted" ad asking for either a steward or clerk, no previous experience necessary.

This October 26 -28 I am running a real-time, first-person dressing station in a barn at the recently acquired "Slaughter Pen" at Fredericksburg, in conjunction with the Columbia Rifles. The scenario involves Union and Confederates collecting wounded and burying dead. For us that means we triage patients as they come in, process the paperwork, medicate them, simulate surgery and monitor the recovery. The patients may be coached beforehand (I'd like) but I think it more realistic that they take verbal and visual cues from us.

This is going to require some more hands besides me. I need stewards competant on pharmacy. Not just "blue mass for the squirts" but "X gtt of laudanum, every two hours" and be able to write that out as a prescription. Know the Latin phrases necessary to do so.

Surgeons will need to know more than just how to remove limbs. I'm shooting for realistic, technical surgery at 2 am, like a detailed trephine with lenticular scalpels and clearing splinters out of the teeth of the saw with the bone brush. Using stump bandages. Procedures right out of Erichsen (http://books.google.com/books?vid=0zmbdU9vxU74e9RYADIy&id=fgFuMsrstToC&pg=PR32&lpg=PR32&dq=Science+and+Art+of+Surgery+Erichsen). High octane stuff, baby. No outright gore, but certainly enough sound to let everyone's fetid imagination fill in the blanks. And leave the rubber limbs at home.

Anyone up for a challenge?

cwdoc45
05-23-2007, 09:05 PM
Doc Nelson,

You are right. There are no more confederate doctors left in Illinois. When we run our joint medical facility, we spilt the group into the 45th Illinois & 5th Georgia for purposes of portraying both sides. Our unit is the largest medical group in Illinois & Wisconsin. We host 8-9 members but mostly are 4-5 at an event.

Medical is like buying a cannon, it costs big bucks to do it right. I figure as head of the medical unit I have $10,000 in my medical kits & instruments, tents, uniforms & everything else.

We should concentrate at least once a year at a National event like the upcoming Mill Springs & start planning MEDICAL for the 150ths starting in 2011. The only way we will ever see a true Brigade set-up is for us to organize it. The Individual units we belong to or support can't help.

Perhaps we should start a thread in this thread for us to just list our events for the year!!! SO WITH THAT IN MIND....

Here are the 45th Illinois-5th Georgia Medical Events for 2007

Mar 17-18 - Shiloh, Tennessee
April 20-21 - Galena, Illinois (Sponsored by 45th Ill-5th GA)
May 19-20 Naperville, Illinois (on I-88
June 2-3 Milwaukee Wisconsin VA Hospital (Illinois & Wisconsin Doc's)
June 24-25 Polo Illinois (on I-88
July 7-8 Wauconda, Illinois -- Lake County Discovery Center
August 4-5 Boscobel Wisconsin (Usually 6-9 docs from Illinois, Wisconsin, & Iowa)
August 18-19 Hillside Illinois (I-294 & I-90 intersection)
Sept 15-16 Lake Villa, Illinois (close to Wisc on I-294)
September 27-30 Mill Springs KY (First Federal Division Event)
Oct 6-7 Stockton, Illinois (by Galena, Illinois -- Illinois & Iowa Doc's)
Oct 13-14 Princeton, Illinois (on I-80 Illinois & Iowa Doc's)
Oct 20-21 Minooka, Illinois (on I-80 by I-55)

Please Continue this thread by ADDING YOUR EVENTS. Maybe we can visit each other in states that are close within the next year. All of our listed events in Illinois are repeated on a yearly basis.

CWDOC 45
Chief Surgeon - Maj. Trevor Steinbach
45th Illinois-5th Georgia Regiments, Inc.
A Not-for-Profit Corp. in Illinois

hanktrent
05-24-2007, 06:25 AM
This October 26 -28 I am running a real-time, first-person dressing station in a barn at the recently acquired "Slaughter Pen" at Fredericksburg, in conjunction with the Columbia Rifles.

If that's what's happening, you know I'm there! Either as a patient or assistant, whatever you need the most.

Something I'm curious about... Everytime I've done a medical impression, which used to be a lot more formerly than now, the problem was getting patients. Equipment you could buy, patients, well... good luck!

The events were generally your classic battle reenactments, but for most of the event, there was nothing to do, because after a half-hour demonstration after the battle, and maybe a couple sick call "scenarios" or brief surgical "demonstrations," the wounded all disappeared, even though historically the surgeons should have been working non-stop after a major battle.

So the standard way of portraying a surgeon was to lay out a display table of reproductions and antiques, and sit around talking. If there were hundreds of visitors, the interpretation itself gave something to do in the day, but in the evening or morning or at small events, the sitting around doing nothing historical drove me crazy, especially when boredom was just the opposite of what I should have been experiencing at the historic time and place.

Is that what it's still like? How do you deal with the lack of patients? I'd love to get back into medical reenacting, and I'd love to be part of the high-pressure overwhelmed atmosphere after a major battle, working steadily (or portraying a patient) until the wee hours and starting in again at dawn. But it really doesn't pay to buy all the clothes and equipment for one event like that every three or four years.

If there's something to do at an event this summer or fall, I'd be glad to fall in with a medical unit and portray a nurse, orderly, knapsack carrier, surgeon's servant, or any role that requires taking orders and doing work and having period knowledge, but minimal equipment. Or a patient, if I'm not the only one!

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

"Doc" Nelson
05-24-2007, 07:05 AM
Something I'm curious about... Every time I've done a medical impression, which used to be a lot more formerly than now, the problem was getting patients. Equipment you could buy, patients, well... good luck!I agree.


The events were generally your classic battle reenactments, but for most of the event, there was nothing to do, because after a half-hour demonstration after the battle, and maybe a couple sick call "scenarios" or brief surgical "demonstrations," the wounded all disappeared, even though historically the surgeons should have been working non-stop after a major battle.

So the standard way of portraying a surgeon was to lay out a display table of reproductions and antiques, and sit around talking. If there were hundreds of visitors, the interpretation itself gave something to do in the day, but in the evening or morning or at small events, the sitting around doing nothing historical drove me crazy, especially when boredom was just the opposite of what I should have been experiencing at the historic time and place.

Is that what it's still like? How do you deal with the lack of patients? I'd love to get back into medical reenacting, and I'd love to be part of the high-pressure overwhelmed atmosphere after a major battle, working steadily (or portraying a patient) until the wee hours and starting in again at dawn. But it really doesn't pay to buy all the clothes and equipment for one event like that every three or four years.Something I have talked with the guys from my Mess is, "plugging in" a medical impression during some events. And, as Noah has done on several occasions . . run the impression from the time we arrive until the time we leave. Patients and all. This would include "Sick Call", Inspecting the Hygiene of the Camp area, ect. etc. I mean, the battle reenactments are "OK" but, you're right "before and afterwards" there isn't much for us to do. And even during the event, are we sending out "Stretcher Bearers" to retrieve the wounded? Are we constantly "re-positioning" the Field Dressing Depot (to stay out of the direct line of fire as much as possible)?


If there's something to do at an event this summer or fall, I'd be glad to fall in with a medical unit and portray a nurse, orderly, knapsack carrier, surgeon's servant, or any role that requires taking orders and doing work and having period knowledge, but minimal equipment. Or a patient, if I'm not the only one!We've been talking about doing a medical program for the entire weekend, while at Fort Duffield. We're still working out the "details" though.

"Doc" Nelson
05-24-2007, 07:07 AM
We should concentrate at least once a year at a National event like the upcoming Mill Springs & start planning MEDICAL for the 150ths starting in 2011. The only way we will ever see a true Brigade set-up is for us to organize it. The Individual units we belong to or support can't help.

Perhaps we should start a thread in this thread for us to just list our events for the year!!! SO WITH THAT IN MIND....

Here are the 45th Illinois-5th Georgia Medical Events for 2007

Mar 17-18 - Shiloh, Tennessee
April 20-21 - Galena, Illinois (Sponsored by 45th Ill-5th GA)
May 19-20 Naperville, Illinois (on I-88
June 2-3 Milwaukee Wisconsin VA Hospital (Illinois & Wisconsin Doc's)
June 24-25 Polo Illinois (on I-88
July 7-8 Wauconda, Illinois -- Lake County Discovery Center
August 4-5 Boscobel Wisconsin (Usually 6-9 docs from Illinois, Wisconsin, & Iowa)
August 18-19 Hillside Illinois (I-294 & I-90 intersection)
Sept 15-16 Lake Villa, Illinois (close to Wisc on I-294)
September 27-30 Mill Springs KY (First Federal Division Event)
Oct 6-7 Stockton, Illinois (by Galena, Illinois -- Illinois & Iowa Doc's)
Oct 13-14 Princeton, Illinois (on I-80 Illinois & Iowa Doc's)
Oct 20-21 Minooka, Illinois (on I-80 by I-55)

Please Continue this thread by ADDING YOUR EVENTS. Maybe we can visit each other in states that are close within the next year. All of our listed events in Illinois are repeated on a yearly basis.

CWDOC 45
Chief Surgeon - Maj. Trevor Steinbach
45th Illinois-5th Georgia Regiments, Inc.
A Not-for-Profit Corp. in Illinois
Trevor,
I also agree with you. As stated in my email to you last week. I'll be coming out to Mill Springs. I will also look at my group's schedule and see what I can attend elsewhere (depending on the "fuel" situation). Also, I'm working on our schedule of events to post on here.

NoahBriggs
05-24-2007, 07:09 AM
I have been given carte blanche on this hospital scenario. There will be things to do; think Paynes Farm on steroids or Burkittsville. To borrow from Emeril, I want to take your standard ho-hum demo and kick it up many notches, not just one. We are doing this for us, to get an idea of what it's like (to the best of our ability). This will be my next-to-last hurrah before I "retire" from military reenacting (W64 being the last) and I want to leave an impression and a decent model anyone can follow.

So patients I think we will have, since the idea is to have them dribble in as the pickets sort out the living and the dead out on the line, and the CRs are pretty good about taking "being wounded" seriously. Instead, I get the feeling we will be short staffed. For now I have Schaffner volunteering as a clerk, Drew Gruber is willing to do basic anesthesia, so what I need at this point is a stew, and preferably another surgeon. Two complete teams would be the best, even if it means snagging volunteers out of the ranks and employing them as orderlies.

Most mainstream has the museum set up

hanktrent
05-24-2007, 07:33 AM
We've been talking about doing a medical program for the entire weekend, while at Fort Duffield. We're still working out the "details" though.

If you work something out and I could be of any help, let me know.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

hanktrent
05-24-2007, 07:36 AM
Instead, I get the feeling we will be short staffed. For now I have Schaffner volunteering as a clerk, Drew Gruber is willing to do basic anesthesia, so what I need at this point is a stew, and preferably another surgeon. Two complete teams would be the best, even if it means snagging volunteers out of the ranks and employing them as orderlies.

I sent you an email, but just let me know what you'd like me to do, and I'll be there!

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

"Doc" Nelson
05-24-2007, 08:02 AM
If you work something out and I could be of any help, let me know.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.netI will let you know.;)

Micah Trent
05-24-2007, 10:44 AM
We've been talking about doing a medical program for the entire weekend, while at Fort Duffield. We're still working out the "details" though.

Doc!!!! You need me:p I can make a great patient at Duffield! I'm a great screamer and if it gets a little uncomfy:mad: ...I can make a great swearer....(sounds like the real thing):rolleyes: What do ya say Doc?;)

Steve Hoover
07-03-2007, 08:23 AM
I am a former CW reenactor who left this hobby in 1998, and have taken up WW2 reenacting. I portray a company aid man (medic) and have been doing so for 5 years now. I've recently been thinking about doing CW again. I miss the cannon fire and the smell of the black powder! It's by chance that I remembered this forum, though it's changed looks since I was here last. I want to start researching CW medicine, as well as the how doctors operated in the field, what they carried, etc. Exactly what the medical component was in the field of battle. I've got some nuggets here and there from this forum, but am looking for more. Are there any websites around that outline the CW medical aspect well? I saw the posting about repoing medical items/medicines, and am very interested in this, as I repro WW2 items. ANY info you could provide would be greatly appreciated.

As I mentioned, I do some reproducing of WW2 rations and paperwork for my unit, and have created a Yahoo group for people to access my files for their own use. I don't know if anybody seeing this post also does WW2 or knows somebody who does, but you can check out my group at: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/doc_hoovie/

Are there any websites or groups around for the exchange of CW related files or reproing ideas? I'd be very interested in hearing about them, also.

Thanks!
Doc Steve Hoover
25th Inf Div
30th Inf Div

NoahBriggs
07-03-2007, 09:29 AM
References

Over the past six or seven years there has been a dearth of great books written which gives the Civil War medical community a better credibility.

* * *

Bethard, Wayne. Lotions, Potions and Deadly Elixirs: Frontier Medicine In America. Taylor Trade Publishing, New York, NY, 2004.

Bollet, MD, Alfred. Civil War Medicine - Challenges and Triumphs,

Dammam, DDS Gordon. The Civil War Medical Collector's Encyclopedia, Vols. 1-3,

Evans, Bruce. A Primer of Civil War Medicine - Non Surgical Medical Practice During the Civil War Years. Bohemian Brigade Bookshop, Knoxville TN. 1998. (found at Bohemian Brigade booksellers; regrettably out of print as of this writing.)

Flannery, Michael. Civil War Pharmacy: A History of Drugs, Drug Supply and Provision and Therapeutics for the Union and Confederacy. Pharmaceutical Products Press, New York, NY, 2004.

Lowry, M.D., Thomas. The Story The Soldiers Wouldn't Tell,

_________________, and Jack Welsh, M.D. Tarnished Scalpels: The Court-Martials of Fifty Union Surgeons. Stackpole Books, Mechanicsville, PA. 2000.

Schaadt, Mark J. Civil War Medicine, an Illustrated History,
(Essentially a lite reading of Bollet's book.)

Miller, Francis T. The Photographic History of the Civil War: Prisons and Hospitals Castle Books, NY

Smith, George W. Medicines for the Union Army: The United States Army Laboratories During the Civil War. Pharmaceutical Products Press, New York, NY, 2001.

Stevens, Serita, and Ann Klarner, Fatal Doses: A Writer’s Guide to Poisons. Writer’s Digest Books, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1990

Woodward, John J. The Hospital Steward’s Manual. Lippencott, Philadelphia, PA, 1862. Reprinted by Norman Publishing, San Francisco, CA, 1991.

Wilbur, C. Keith. Civil War Medicine,



Primary –
For official uniform regs, of course, is the 1861 Regulations.

For running a general hospital, The Hospital Steward's Manual, by J.J. Woodward. Indispensible for writing prescriptions in proper format and all the insane forms you have to fill out to keep the place running.

NoahBriggs
07-03-2007, 09:30 AM
Online

A lot of the primary references may be had online for free. They are a real pain to print out, though. The best way to print anything from Making of America is to copy the page of text on MOA as an image, then paste it into a Word document, then print. It does not waste paper (only one page prints, as opposed to three with MOA’s non-printer-friendly setup); it’s easier to handle in the long run. You can even copy the whole book into multiple Word files to have onhand as needed.

If you prefer to save your sanity, try plugging your title and/or author into Google books. Often you can download the whole durn thing as one big PDF file. I recommend limiting your search by clicking on the box for full text only, but you will find memoirs of surgeons and medical personnel from both sides of the Civil War and some of the texts from Europe that such personnel may have read as texts or for their own edification, such as memoirs from the Crimean War.

Downsides are that on occasion pages will be missing, blurred, or the schmoe assigned to do the scan might accidentally include images of his fingers on the page.

Administration

http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/welcome.html
Multilingual Glossary of technical and popular medical terms in nine European languages.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/pageviewer-idx?c=moa&cc=moa&idno=agy4285.0001.001&q1=Revised+Regulations&frm=frameset&view=image&seq=320
Forms from the Revised Regs, starting on page 320. Bear in mind the majority of the forms here are for running an isolated post hospital, not necessarily a field hospital, which has a slightly different batch of papers trailing after it.

http://books.google.com/books?vid=OCLC63626435&id=mJEioeOcjnkC&printsec=titlepage&dq=A+Dictionary+of+Medical+Science
Medical lexicon: A Dictionary of Medical Science : Containing a Concise Explanation of the... By Robley Dunglison. Good for looking up those obscure terms you find in the texts.


Anatomy

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AJX6690.0001.001
The principal forms of the skeleton and of the teeth. By professor R. Owen ...

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AJZ0098.0001.001
A treatise on anatomy & physiology...

Dental

http://books.google.com/books?vid=OCLC03471728&id=VNA8t775WkMC&pg=RA1-PR17&lpg=RA1-PR17&dq=dentistry#PPP6,M1
A Practical Treatise on Operative Dentistry By Jonathan Taft

Diseases

http://www.paul_smith.doctors.org.uk/ArchaicMedicalTerms.htm
Archaic medical terms. Nice list put together and targeted towards the geaneology crowd, to help them with their biographical research.

http://www.cdc.gov/
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It is used to research the diseases and symptomology. You will sometimes find pictures of the disease which you can use as a reference if you choose to make a patient up.


Diabetes
A member of my group asked me to do a little research on diabetes and how it was treated. I was kinda curious myself, especially since a big deal is made over Types I and II today. “Fat” frequently equaled “well-fed” back then, so how did the obese diabetes patients cope? Below are some of the sites I checked. This list provides a step-by-step example of how I research a topic.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;type=simple;rgn=full%20text;q1=di abetes;firstpubl1=1800;firstpubl2=1870;view=reslis t;subview=short;sort=occur;start=1;size=25
search result for Diabetes on MOA


http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&q=history+of+diabetes&btnG=Search
Google Search on diabetes history

http://www.diabetes.ca/Section_About/timeline.asp
Diabetes history

http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~abhu000/diabetes/buchan_gunn.html
More history of diabetes

Now, back to our regularly scheduled source list.

http://uhavax.hartford.edu/bugl/histepi.htm
History of plagues and other epidemics.

http://home.earthlink.net/~claelliott/chron1850.htm chronology of science in the US. Good for establishing your persona’s knowledge timeline.

http://www.bestofcolumbus.com/fussichen/otdEduc.htm education chronology

http://civilwarmed.home.att.net/ Medical articles. Sort of a “gateway” site which provides laundry lists of links towards other sites. I mined this list dry for secondary sources. You know you have mined a subject dry when you find yourself directed to the same clump of websites over and over.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/index.html The National Library of Medicine offers the history of medicine. This is “the history of medicine”, which means you must set very specific searches to find your topic. There is a lot of post-war stuff here.

http://www.quackwatch.org/13Hx/TM/01.html History of patent medicines. Quackwatch and Homeowatch are two websites which monitor homeopathy and quack alternative remedies that are available online. They provide a good allopathic perspective on the history of homeopathy and alternative remedies, with a healthy dose of skepticism tossed into the receipe for good measure.

http://www.civilwarmed.org/ Museum of Civil War Medicine, Frederick Md. Good museum, with lots of books and a few repros. Repro items are expensive and need to be upgraded before they can be used in the field. The Museum is actively reaching out to the reenacting community in an effort to make their research resources easily available.

http://www.civilwarsurgeons.org/ Society of Civil War Surgeons – quarterly journal with articles, conventions, and announcements. Fee required.

http://members.aol.com/wwhitby/diseases.html
19th century disease list provides colloquial expressions for lots of illnesses. This list is targeted towards geneaologists who might not be as familiar as we with medical nicknames.

NoahBriggs
07-03-2007, 09:31 AM
Primary Sources

Secondary sources are good for a casual summary. I, and a few other researchers feel we must check the sources cited all the way back to the original We are checking to see if the source being cited was actually being cited properly. Often authors tend to pick and choose which quotes are the best for their thesis, and something yanked out of context will convey a whole different meaning.

Short story – if you really want to read how a procedure was supposed to be done, read the manual on surgical procedures. Barring that, read the actual surgeon’s notes, diaries, reports and so on to extrapolate what was supposed to be going on.

Yer Basic Medicine

http://books.google.com/books?vid=OCLC06172234&id=KCq_uLJINIYC&pg=PR1&dq=%22A+treatise+On+the+Practice+of+Medicine%22
A Treatise on the practice of medicine v.2 By George Bacon Wood
If you must read a great primary source with which doctors were familiar, read this one. Most doctors of the period would remember the second edition (1860) with fondness.

http://books.google.com/books?vid=OCLC08397604&id=DK-tOasoTXsC&pg=RA2-PA1&lpg=RA2-PA1&dq=Diseases+of+the+Testis#PPP12,M1
A Practical treatise on the diseases of the testis, and of the spermatic cord and scrotum By Thomas Blizard Curling, Paul Beck Goddard, William H. Gobrecht

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AEU2766.0001.001
The opium habit, with suggestions as to the remedy ...
Day, Horace B., 1819-1870. New York: Harper & brothers, 1868.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AJZ0767.0001.001
The science & art, or the principles & practice of medicine...
Peters, John C. (John Charles), 1819-1893.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AKK3048.0001.001
The Reformation of medical science, demanded by inductive philosophy : a discourse delivered before the New York Physicians' Society, on their anniversary, November 21, 1838 / by William Channing.



Homeopathy

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=ALU2734.0001.001
On the treatment, diet, and nursing of yellow fever: for popular use / by Wm. H. Holcombe.
Holcombe, William H. (William Henry), 1825-1893.
Philadelphia: Boericke & Tafel, [186-]

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AKP6478.0001.001
Manual of homoeopathic theory and practice, designed for the use of physicians and families. By Arthur Lutze, M.D. Tr. from the German by Charles J. Hempel, M.D.
Lutze, Arthur, 1813-1870., Hempel, Charles J. tr. (Charles Julius), 1811-1879,
New York, Philadelphia: Wiliam Radde, 1862.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=ALR8700.0001.001
Jahr's and Possart's new manual of the homœopathic materia medica : arranged with reference to well authenticated observations at the sick bed : and accompanied by an alphabetical repertory, to facilitate and secure the selection of a suitable remedy in any given case.
Jahr, G. H. G. (Gottlieb Heinrich Georg), 1800-1875., Possart, A. Charakteristik der homöopathischen Arzneien., Jahr, G. H. G. (Gottlieb Heinrich Georg), 1800-1875. Handbuch der Haupt-Anzeigen für die richitige Wahl der homöopathischen Heilmittel vorzuglien nach den bisberigen Erfahrungen am Krankenbette.
New-York: W. Radde, 1853.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AKK5057.0001.001
Medical reform: being an examination into the nature of the prevailing system of medicine; and an exposition of some of its chief evils; with allopathic revelations. A remedy for the evil. By Samuel Cockburn, M.D.
Cockburn, Samuel.
Philadelphia, New York: Rademacher & Sheek, W. Radde, 1857.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AJZ0920.0001.001
Letters on diphtheria, by J. H. Pulte, M.D. and Egbert Guernsey, M.D.
Pulte, Joseph Hippolyt, 1811-1884., Guernsey, Egbert, joint author. 1823-1903,
Saint Louis, Mo.: R. & H. Luyties, [c1860]

http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/holmes.html
Homeopathy and its Kindred Delusions – Oliver Wendell Holmes
As you may have guessed from the website, this is the one article in the Homeopathy section which is anti-homeopathy.

Hospitals

http://www.library.vcu.edu/tml/bibs/cwmed.html CW field hospitals from VCU

http://www.geocities.com/hospital_steward/ hospital steward's tent. Okay site. I took their list of repro medicines and upgraded it.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=ACK4209.0001.001
Leaves from the diary of an army surgeon: or, Incidents of field, camp, and hospital life. By Thomas T. Ellis.

Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion in Google for original medical AARs http://ehistory.osu.edu/uscw/library/or/067/0210.cfm And read on for the entirety of the report. It details the organisation, operation, and functions of the entire medical corps of the Army of the Potomac during the Overland Campaign (Wilderness) and includes specifics regarding the various Division Hospitals, and Ambulance Trains of the various Corps that are priceless. True enough, this represents the culmination of work that reached its peak efficiency during 1864, but it's very worth your while to read it and even print it out for future reference.

Hydropathy

Alternative therapy which required a trip to a mountain spring resort. One would bathe in the water, drink the water and consume a light diet to help feel better. The resort or spa grew up around a spring which has been claimed to have restorative powers. Frankly, getting up into the mountains with less humidity and insects and pollution was a great help. Drinking lots of water will certainly revive you. Many of the springs had minerals in them – one of which was sometimes lithium, which is known to be an anti-depressant.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AJZ0631.0007.001
Water-cure library, embracing all the most popular works on the subject...
New York: Fowlers & Wells, 1850.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AJZ0876.0001.001
The water-cure applied to every known disease... by J.H. Rausse [pseud.]...Tr. by C.H. Meeker...
[Francke, Heinrich F.] 1805-1848.
New York: Fowlers & Wells, 1850.


Mental Health

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&q=Galt+moral+management&btnG=Search
Google Search results on “Galt Moral Management”. This was a new idea of having the patients living in small apartments rather than cells, and providing useful therapies, like reading, painting and so on.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?artid=227192&blobtype=pdf
Moral and Humane – Patients’ Libraries in Early Nineteenth-Century American Mental Hospitals

On the topic of insane asylums generally, here's an account of an outsider's visit to a New York lunatic asylum, published in 1854:

http://cdl.library.cornell.edu/cgi-b...K4014-0009-105

OB-GYN

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AKK5515.0001.001
The ladies' medical guide. By S. Pancoast.
Pancoast, Seth, 1823-1889.
Philadelphia: published by John E. Potter, 1865.

http://books.google.com/books?vid=OCLC19814488&id=eHTs8YseV8IC&pg=RA1-PR25&lpg=RA1-PR25&dq=obstetrics#PRA1-PR24,M1
Obstetrics: The Science and the Art By Charles Delucena Meigs

http://books.google.com/books?vid=OCLC03983692&id=c4A8nYMWLaUC&printsec=titlepage&dq=Ladies+Medical+Guide
On the theory and practice of midwifery By Fleetwood Churchill

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AKM7562.0001.001
A systematic treatise on abortion: by Edwin M. Hale, M.D.
Hale, E. M. (Edwin Moses), 1829-1899.
Chicago: C. S. Halsey, 1866.
Regardless of the feelings on the subject, it was illegal back then and it was done back then.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AKM7566.0001.001
A treatise on the diseases of females. Disorders of menstruation. By John C. Peters, M.D.
Peters, John C. (John Charles), 1819-1893.
New York: Radde, [etc., etc.], 1854.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AKP6534.0001.001
A treatise on the diseases of married females. Disorders of pregnancy, parturition and lactation, by John C. Peters.
Peters, John C. (John Charles), 1819-1893.
New York: Radde, [etc., etc.], 1854.

http://www.mum.org/
Museum of Menstruation – not really recommended for serious research. The site is cluttered, disorganized and poorly documented.

NoahBriggs
07-03-2007, 09:32 AM
Pharmacy

http://www.secondwi.com/medicalteam/medical2.htm
2nd Wisconsin website. I modified the text from the site and plumped it up for the diagnosis and sick call.

http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/History/soldis.htm
Mythical Roots of US Drug Policy – Soldiers Disease
Argues that the idea of lots of morphine addicts after the War was overrated and overstated. Argues that the US gov’t uses this as the basic excuse for the current Controlled Substances Act.

http://www.quackwatch.org/13Hx/TM/01.html
Toadstool Millionaires: Social History of Patent Medicines. Another history of patent medicines of the era.

http://books.google.com/books?vid=OCLC06000104&id=cXtS6_BobiMC&pg=PA1&lpg=PA1&dq=The+book+of+Prescriptions#PRA1-PA4,M1
The Book of prescriptions: Containing Upwards of 3000 Prescriptions Collected from the Practice... By Henry Beasley
Great reference!! He is not kidding on the number of prescriptions. Also provides a glossary of Latin terms to translate prescriptions.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AJX6282.0001.001
The druggist's general receipt book: . . .
Beasley, Henry.
Philadelphia: Lindsay and Blakiston, 1857.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AJX6284.0001.001
The medical formulary... By Henry Beasley. With additions from the 6th London ed.
Beasley, Henry.
Philadelphia: Lindsay & Blakiston, 1856.
Beasley’s hands must have been cramping by now, what with all this writing.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AJX6060.0003.001
New York Journal of Pharmacy. v. 1-3, 1852-1854.
Antisell, Thomas, 1817-1893., McCready, B. W. (Benjamin William), 1813-1892.
New York: , 1852-54.

http://books.google.com/books?vid=ISBN1417959584&id=6ifhsM5gHmgC&pg=PP1&lpg=PP1&ots=qt4Gxl95xj&dq=Medical+Formulary&sig=WNWHR5ETuRCEUSTU8JU2_3d8D9w#PRA1-PA295,M1
The Medical Formulary: Being a Collection . . . By Benjamin Ellis

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AJQ0878.0001.001
The people's vade-mecum; comprising a collection of valuable recipes ... with a few simple and curious experiments in chemistry ... By a practical chemist.
Buffalo: , 1850.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;q1=diabetes;rgn=full%20text;view= toc;idno=AGM0107.0001.001
Resources of the southern fields and forests, medical, economical, and agricultural;
Porcher, Francis Peyre, 1825-1895.
Charleston: Walker, Evans & Cogswell, printers, 1869.
The famous “Porcher Book” to which the Confederate doctors will allude when discussing Confederate medicine. There are a lot of errors in this book, so I am told.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;view=toc;idno=AJX6222.0001.001
A treatise on pharmacy ... By Edward Parrish ...
Parrish, Edward, 1822-1872.
Philadelphia: Henry C. Lea, 1865.

http://books.google.com/books?vid=OCLC04291852&id=XY8Ic7iePJoC&printsec=titlepage&dq=Treatise+on+Pharmacy#PPP6,M1
An Introduction to practical pharmacy: Designed as a Text-book for the Student, and as a Guide to... By Edward Parrish. This is your one-stop shopping on how to set up an 1850s pharmacy.

http://oha.alexandriava.gov/apothecary/
Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary, Alexandria, VA. I volunteer here.

Surgery

http://www.ec-securehost.com/WouldYouBelieve/Ben_Nye_Moulage_Makeup_and_Casuality_Simulation.ht ml
Ben Nye Moulagee Makeup and Casualty Simulation

http://www.trauma.org/index.php/main/images/
Trauma.org image bank. Requires registration to view now. Graphic images of typical traumas, arranged by body part, with a special section for burns and other traumas.

www.civilwarmedbooks.com Bohemian Brigade, Ed Archer makes the only
repro surgical kits. Keep a defib kit nearby before you look at his prices.

http://www.antiquecenter-getty.com/ The place to go for any medical antiques. Good staff at the store. Lousy website.

http://antiquescientifica.com/index.htm for all your medical antiques needs. Also, updates on frauds and fakes.

http://www.medicalantiques.com/ Another site with delicious links.

http://www.braceface.com/medical/Pages/Antiquesurgicalsets.htm
Identifying surgical sets

http://www.mtn.org/quack/
Museum of Questionable Medical Devices. Fun, off-beat place if you get bored with high-octane reading.

http://www.inquiry.net/outdoor/skills/instruction/simulations.htm
instructions on basic moulagee application. I believe I adapted my remarks on moulagees and patient prep from this site.

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10740a.htm Dr. Auguste Nealton, who invented the nealton probe in 1862.

http://www.deathonline.net/ Describes basic postmortem and decomp process. Graphic site. http://www.rotten.com/ also provides some post-mortem pictures. Rotten is more a tabloid feel than Deathonline.

http://books.google.com/books?vid=0zmbdU9vxU74e9RYADIy&id=fgFuMsrstToC&pg=PR32&lpg=PR32&dq=Science+and+Art+of+Surgery+Erichsen
The Science and art of surgery By John Eric Erichsen. This is what I use for my surgical manual.

http://books.google.com/books?vid=ISBN0930405706&id=vOxkjooEA9QC&pg=RA27-PA60&lpg=RA27-PA60&ots=zZo5tZtG7P&dq=Elisabeth+Bennion+Antique+Medical+Instruments&sig=WZHwx-dcRIUn2Q5-yZgCYufS_FQ#PPP1,M1
American Surgical Instruments: an illustrated history of their manufacture and a directory of... By James M. Edmonson. Modern book about surgical instruments.

http://books.google.com/books?vid=OC...rgeon&as_brr=1
Report of a Committee of the Associate Medical Members of the Sanitary Commission on the Subject...
By William Alexander Hammond (1862)



http://books.google.com/books?vid=OC...rgeon&as_brr=1
Treatise on Gun-shot Wounds, on Inflammation, Erysipelas, and Mortification, on Injuries of...
By G. J. (George James) Guthrie (1827)

http://books.google.com/books?vid=05...rgeon&as_brr=1
Introductory Lectures to a Course of Military Surgery Delivered in The University of Edinburgh
By Ballingall M. D. F.R.S.E., George (1830)
I included the Edinburgh University text since that institution was one of the premier medical schools of the period and that text, along with the other period volumes, would have represented the state of knowledge when at least some of the surgeons who served during our Civil War were getting their medical education.

http://books.google.com/books?vid=OC...rgeon&as_brr=1
On Military and Camp Hospitals: And the Health of the Troops in the Field. Being the Results of a...
By L. (Lucien) Baudens (1862)

Here are two more online books. Both links look identical, but look at the "milsurg", one has "csa" and the other has "usa".

Manual of Military Surgery, Confederate Army, 1863
http://jdc.jefferson.edu/milsurgcsa/1/

A Manual of Military Surgery
by S.D. Gross, MD, 1861
http://jdc.jefferson.edu/milsurgusa/1/

Alcott, William The Mother’s Medical Guide to Children’s Diseases

Beecher, Catherine A Treatise on Domestic Economy

Imray, Keith A Popular Cyclopedia of Modern Domestic Medicine

What are you waiting for?
Start reading!
Have fun!

Steve Hoover
07-03-2007, 10:20 AM
GOOD LORD! Thank you very much for the references. I'm sure it took alot of time and I do appreciate it! T'will keep me busy!

NoahBriggs
07-03-2007, 11:09 AM
As you may have guessed -

I have no life.

Revised to include:
I was torn between the urge not to spoon-feed the rookies, and posting so nobody has to reinvent the wheel. Not reinventing the wheel won out - mistakes in this subgenre are more expensive than other specialities, so it does not hurt to post what you have found, on the understanding it will be revised as new research presents itself.

A cursory search will reveal we posted a lot of other research as well. This conference is smaller than the others. I thnk it best to read through all the threads. That will allow you enough time to discover the info you can mine, and allow you to get an idea of our posting policies here.

Double revised to include - the websites and sources I posted are FYI only. I nor this list don't endorse any of the ideas or philosophies espoused therein. The "mini-reviews" I posted next to the website links are my opinion only.

Mojo1842
07-12-2007, 03:02 PM
Lets not forget Paris' Pharmacologia (if you can find a copy of it) for enough period theory on the art of prescribing to make your eyes bleed.