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View Full Version : I need a Governor Pickens!!



queenoftheconfederacy
04-21-2007, 01:09 AM
Hey yall! I'm new to this, but my friend told me about this forum and how it would be a good idea to find what I'm looking for. I portray Mrs. Lucy Petway Holcombe Pickens, also known as the Queen of the Confederacy, wife of Col. Francis Wilkinson Pickens, governor of South Carolina during the succession and firing on Fort Sumter, I don't understand how this man can fade from commonly known history and from reenactments, just as I don't understand how Lucy's name isn't as common as Mary Chestnut's when it was Lucy that was on Confederate money, anyway, I digress, I figured that if I am going to be impersonating Lucy, that there needs to be a Col. Pickens as well and we need to be together since they were husband and wife, he was also 27 years older than her, and I do want to stick as close to that as possible, he was 51 and she 25 when they married, I mean I am 21 right now and Lucy was 28 when the war started, but I play off the age thing well, hehe, I am also working on trying to get together a Holcombe Legion with a friend of mine as well, which was named for Lucy of course, so basically what I am looking for is someone to portray Gov. Pickens along with me, I don't expect for this to come together quickly, but if anyone is interested, please let me know, Id really appreciate it!!:-D

Here is a picture of Col. Pickens
http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b240/CarolinaGirl1670/Picture037.jpg

And a picture of Lucy in the 1850s, it is easy to see why she was known as the most beautiful woman in the South
http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b240/CarolinaGirl1670/Picture036.jpg

TennCav
04-21-2007, 07:35 AM
What area of the country are you in?

queenoftheconfederacy
04-21-2007, 06:32 PM
I live in Florence, South Carolina, but Im always on the go somewhere, I do plan on doing a few out of state events this year

Strawfoot
04-23-2007, 01:33 PM
If I wasn't happily married and madly in love with my wife, I'd carpool with you to any event, any time.

Specialty impressions are a much unappreciated endeavor in the hobby, but your particular one may pass muster...

Welcome to the hobby.

queenoftheconfederacy
04-23-2007, 06:12 PM
Lol, funny you say carpool, Im going to start my own group of carpoolers soon, and you are right, impressions are so unappreciated, unless its someone portraying Robert E. Lee or Abe Lincoln, impressions help teach others about the real people who experienced the war and should be more common

madisontigers
04-23-2007, 10:19 PM
Ciara,

Wow, how cool is this, I never imagined it would happen. I have Pickens blood, whichproudly runs through my veins. Actually, Governor Pickens is one of my fourth generation Cousins. I am actually descended from the Captain Robert Pickens( Of Revolutionary war fame) line. This is great, please feel free to contact me.My mother and I have compiled tons of information on the Pickens family, so feel free to ask any questions. Email me at Legioxx2002@yahoo.com if you are interested.

Regards,

David Long

tompritchett
04-23-2007, 10:36 PM
Specialty impressions are a much unappreciated endeavor in the hobby, but your particular one may pass muster...

One reason is that, if they are to be done correctly, they require a great deal more research than being just a common soldier. On more than one occassion, I have had people try to persuade me to do a Jefferson Davis impression but I have hestitated because I know that I would have to devote far more time in reading in all his speeches and memorizing all aspects of his life than currently I have time for. One of the reasons that I let my sideburns grow down and out was to try to reduce the resemblance and thus diffuse some of the pressure. When I retire from being a military reenactor, I might change my mind.

One specialty impression that I recommend that you catch when she is around is a lady that does Mary Lincoln. She knows her stuff and is extremely credible. I saw her once and asked her some general questions about the Lexington, Ky area, where Mary Linclon grew up (I grew up in Frankfort about 25 miles to the East), and she demonstrated her that she had truly done her research about not only Mrs. Lincoln but her siblings also.

As for Gov. Pickens, he is not one of my more favorite Confederate leaders. If he had not been such a hot-head and been so insistent that the Maj. Anderson's men be removed from Ft. Sumter immediately, the Confederacy could have waited for the Union to make the first move. As was clearly demonstrated, the Confederate forces around the Charleston harbor clearly had the firepower to quickly neutralize Fort Sumter had Maj. Anderson tried to interdict any shipping coming into or leaving the harbor. Likewise, they had boats that could have stopped any unarmed resupply mission and probably could have beat back even a serious naval resupply effort using the combined firepower of the surrounding forts. Regardless, when Davis ordered the firing of the first shots, he effectively galvinized the Northern resistance to the secession and, ultimately guaranteed the destruction of the very nation that they all were trying to create. Because Pickens was pressing Davis hard for just that decision, he too must share the blame for the ultimate destruction of an independent Confederacy.

KarinTimour
04-24-2007, 06:21 AM
Ciara:

I really enjoyed learning about Lucy Holcombe Pickens -- before I read "Queen of the Confederacy" last year, I really knew nothing about her, except that she was on the Confederate bills (and was the inspiration for "Holcombe's Legion"). I'm always interested in the different ways to show additional facets of this time period. Tom's points about Mrs. Lincoln are really interesting -- while many people may not recognize Mrs. Lincoln, they often recognize her husband, and if she just is in his area, people would figure out who she is. Will most spectators in your area recognize Mrs. Pickens or Governor Pickens? If not, how would you let spectators know who you were portraying? What would you do at the average reenactment? What would Governor Pickens do, and how could he support you in portraying this impression?

Thanks for a very interesting thread,
Karin Timour
Period Knitting-- Socks, Sleeping Hats, Balaclavas
Warm. Durable. Documented.
Atlantic Guard Soldiers' Aid Society
Email: Ktimour@aol.com

tompritchett
04-24-2007, 07:07 AM
while many people may not recognize Mrs. Lincoln, they often recognize her husband, and if she just is in his area, people would figure out who she is.

In the particular instance that I met her here, there was no Mr. Lincoln present. As part of the schedule, there was a tea with Mrs. Lincoln. It was there that I met her.

madisontigers
04-24-2007, 07:19 AM
One reason is that, if they are to be done correctly, they require a great deal more research than being just a common soldier. On more than one occassion, I have had people try to persuade me to do a Jefferson Davis impression but I have hestitated because I know that I would have to devote far more time in reading in all his speeches and memorizing all aspects of his life than currently I have time for. One of the reasons that I let my sideburns grow down and out was to try to reduce the resemblance and thus diffuse some of the pressure. When I retire from being a military reenactor, I might change my mind.

One specialty impression that I recommend that you catch when she is around is a lady that does Mary Lincoln. She knows her stuff and is extremely credible. I saw her once and asked her some general questions about the Lexington, Ky area, where Mary Linclon grew up (I grew up in Frankfort about 25 miles to the East), and she demonstrated her that she had truly done her research about not only Mrs. Lincoln but her siblings also.

As for Gov. Pickens, he is not one of my more favorite Confederate leaders. If he had not been such a hot-head and been so insistent that the Maj. Anderson's men be removed from Ft. Sumter immediately, the Confederacy could have waited for the Union to make the first move. As was clearly demonstrated, the Confederate forces around the Charleston harbor clearly had the firepower to quickly neutralize Fort Sumter had Maj. Anderson tried to interdict any shipping coming into or leaving the harbor. Likewise, they had boats that could have stopped any unarmed resupply mission and probably could have beat back even a serious naval resupply effort using the combined firepower of the surrounding forts. Regardless, when Davis ordered the firing of the first shots, he effectively galvinized the Northern resistance to the secession and, ultimately guaranteed the destruction of the very nation that they all were trying to create. Because Pickens was pressing Davis hard for just that decision, he too must share the blame for the ultimate destruction of an independent Confederacy.


"Ever heard of the firing on the Star Of The West?" Yes, Pickens was a hot head, but the crapola hit the fan after the troops garrisoning Moultrie evacuated to Sumter.

Daid Long

tompritchett
04-24-2007, 08:01 AM
"Ever heard of the firing on the Star Of The West?" Yes, Pickens was a hot head, but the crapola hit the fan after the troops garrisoning Moultrie evacuated to Sumter.


Actually yes, and your post brings up two more points. First, one of the reasons that Maj. Anderson decided to evacuate his men to Sumter was to avoid any accidental firings generated from the probings of the SC militia of his defenses at Moutrie. From one vantage point, his move made sense as it removed his men away from any individual hot-heads who might be tempted to fire the first shot at his men, as well as remove his men from a situation where one of them might over-react in a situation due to the overall tenseness of the situation. From his point of view, by moving to Sumter, he was attempting to defuse the situation while remaining true to his obiligation to his oath as a Federal officer to preserve the integrity of his command. Of course, we all know now that his move ended up being a major mistake, as it was viewed by SC and the South as a major escalation of the situation rather than an attempt to defuse the situation - primarily due to Sumter's position commanding the entrance to the harbor.

As far as the firing on the Star of the West, because of the Northern uproar over this event and the fact that it almost brought about a Northern declaration of war, it should have been an indicator to Pickens et al. that firing on Sumter could easier bring about the formal declaration of war, especially since the overall administration had since shifted to a party which was viewed as being much less sympathetic to Southern interests. After all, it was the election of this new administration that had brought about the very secession that had set this whole sad affair into motion.

hanktrent
04-24-2007, 08:38 AM
One reason is that, if they are to be done correctly, they require a great deal more research than being just a common soldier. On more than one occassion, I have had people try to persuade me to do a Jefferson Davis impression but I have hestitated because I know that I would have to devote far more time in reading in all his speeches and memorizing all aspects of his life than currently I have time for.

Ironically, I think the only reason they seem to require more work is that more people know about them, so it requires more knowledge to give the illusion that you're really them, to the average person.

A private soldier's impression takes just as much work to bring it up to the same level, but because most people don't know or care about all the details of a private's life, there's less pressure to do so. Imagine if you were doing a private soldier's impression, when "your" great great granddaughter the genealogist showed up, said she'd read all the letters "you" wrote home, and wanted to hear all about "your" life. Not so easy then, huh? :D

But people play the odds, and the odds of that happening are so slim, compared to the odds of meeting a Davis or Lincoln scholar when you're portraying Davis or Lincoln, that they figure it's not worth the study.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

tompritchett
04-24-2007, 09:16 AM
But people play the odds, and the odds of that happening are so slim, compared to the odds of meeting a Davis or Lincoln scholar when you're portraying Davis or Lincoln, that they figure it's not worth the study.


But all it takes is one person that has read up on your character and catches you on a detail that your character definitely would have remembered, and you are shot. The more famous the character, the more books that there are out about your character and thus the more likely you can have your drawers exposed in public. Personally, it would not be the Davis scholar that would worry me as I would quickly shift from teacher to student as soon as realized what happened. Rather it would be the smart alec that wanted to show his buds how cool he was by publically stumping the "expert" thru direct questioning (with Mary Lincoln, my questions were more indirect where she could have legitimately, stated that it had been a while since her last visit without looking bad).

Mint Julep
04-24-2007, 09:09 PM
Imagine if you were doing a private soldier's impression, when "your" great great granddaughter the genealogist showed up, said she'd read all the letters "you" wrote home, and wanted to hear all about "your" life. Not so easy then, huh?

I am reminded of two impressions I have done:

At the last McDowell, I portrayed a company captain of a particular company (I have since forgotten who or which) and up walks his g-g-g-grandson, Jeff Inlay, wanting to shake my hand. I had my picture made with him and his son.

At the Immortal 600 a couple of years ago, I portrayed Lt. Joseph Hastings, 17th Tenn Inf, from Shelbyville, Tenn. My mother heard about my plans and took me to introduce her friend, Lt. Hasting's granddaughter. She was about 9 years old when the old warrior came to live his last days with her family. I was mightily overwhelmed as I shook her hand and realized that she had held hands with the man I would portray.

Just to make the point that what Hank suggested does happen. Be careful when you adopt a name to do honor to the person.