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Fenian
03-22-2007, 06:01 PM
Folks, I'm curious.I see a lot of knowledge and expertise offered on this forum generiously and often.I see questions that are for assisting the neopyhte and others that require pulling a book or two off the shelf or visiting a couple sites on your computer.Time consuming but let's face it we are all here because we love it. What confuses me is that some of us treat this like they are entitled while others will at the very least acknowlege whatever info comes their way.When someone is willing to share with me that commodity that gets all the more dearer as we get older...their time,I hope I always remember to at least get back with a thank you.When I get too old or too cold to remember to do that it is time to hang the brogans up and get in to competitive stamp collecting! My whine for the day,thanks for listening Bud Scully 13th NJ and 69th:confused: NY

TParker
03-22-2007, 07:20 PM
But I discern from your post that you are of the same generation as myself, one where courtesy and manners are important. Unfortunately, in today's world, where the etiquitte of proper forms of correspondence has given way to the poorly worded and often (unintentionally) rude email, the manners and necessity of a simple "please" and "thank you" often are overlooked as well. It is the same modern mentality which allows some individuals to ignore phone messages and requests for return calls, which is something I cannot abide.

This is one reason I enjoy this hobby, with its adherance to "Victorian" manners and the requirement of politeness and common courtesy. It is also the reason to focus my efforts within my own unit on teaching young people the "proper" manners lacking in today's society, but which are nonetheless acceptable and proper wherever one finds oneself in the modern world.




Folks, I'm curious.I see a lot of knowledge and expertise offered on this forum generiously and often.I see questions that are for assisting the neopyhte and others that require pulling a book or two off the shelf or visiting a couple sites on your computer.Time consuming but let's face it we are all here because we love it. What confuses me is that some of us treat this like they are entitled while others at the very least acknowlege whatever info comes their way.When someone is willing to share with me that commodity that gets all the more dearer as we get older...their time,I hope I always remember to at least get back with a thank you.When I get too old or too cold to remember to do that it is time to hang the brogans up and get in to competitive stamp collecting! My whine for the day,thanks for listening Bud Scully 13th NJ and 69th:confused: NY

Fenian
03-22-2007, 07:54 PM
Terry,You are absolutely correct.My grandfather gave me my his grandfather's rifle musket when I was nine year's old(50 years ago).All these years I've really been enamoured with the simplicity of their belief systems and their willingness to put themselves on the line for it. Bud

TParker
03-22-2007, 08:20 PM
Terry,You are absolutely correct.My grandfather gave me my his grandfather's rifle musket when I was nine year's old(50 years ago).All these years I've really been enamoured with the simplicity of their belief systems and their willingness to put themselves on the line for it. Bud

It is the great blessing of modern technolgy (and I admit to being a techno nerd, albeit older than most) that it allows kindred spirits to connect via mediums such as this. I do not have the good fortune to share in material mementos such as your grandfather's largesse (of which I must admit I am understandably jealous), but I obtained from my own father an ingrained love and appreciation of history, and cultures, and the need to be always correct in my manners and deportment. While some may disparage the use of "proper" manners, it has always allowed me to "eat pie with a fork" anywhere in the world, and in whatever culture, I may find myself. And it also allows me to understand, if not emulate, the ability of those who volunteered during the Civil War to place the greater good on a higher plane than their own needs or fears.

sbl
03-23-2007, 05:22 AM
Terry,

Thanks for that one Terry. My mother's family were somewhere between Edwardian Era "gentile poor" and middle class so that I was encouraged to "act respectable" and not be "found dead in ditch."

rebelyell62
03-23-2007, 07:38 AM
Three cheers my Yankee friend !
Courtesy, never goes out of style imho.

There are times when I hold the door for the "gentler" sex or someone my senior, and they'll look at me in near shock.

Course it could be my long hair and chin whiskers, the dear souls may think that someone who looks as I do, could not spell courtesy, let alone possess a tad of the ever decreasing commodity.

YMHS,
Wendell
The Orphan Brigade.

BigDuke634
03-23-2007, 11:53 AM
In my case, it's just the way I am. I always open doors for others,say please and thank you. I use to be a rotton little punk in my younger and wilder days, but as you grow older , you tend to see that being snotty really doesn't get you anywhere.

netnet81
03-23-2007, 12:54 PM
When I first moved to Texas I was shocked when a man I didn't know held the door open for me and couldn't help but laugh the first time I saw a cowboy actually tip his cowboy hat to me. It's so strange now when I go home and have doors shut on me because I expect the person in front of me to at least hold it until I take it.

bob 125th nysvi
03-23-2007, 02:16 PM
really.

Knowledge is power.

Sharing knowledge is sharing power. People who want to improve the world do that.

With holding knowledge is the willful act of concentrating power in your own hands for your own purposes. Sometimes as small a purpose as being able to insult others.

I don't see failing to share knowledge it as a lack of manners but as a really pitiful attempt to make oneself seem more important than the person lacking the knowledge.

In the real army the FIRST things veterans do is sit down the fresh fish and tell them all the important things they need to know and all the wrong things they need to unlearn.

The reason for this, collective survival. A military unit is the preeminent example of only being as strong as your weakest link. Having everybody on the same page, able to hold up their end of the bargain is vital because anything else gets people KILLED.

So when a reenactor withholds information, for whatever reason, they are acting more "farby" than even the reenactor with the lowest level of authenticity. They aren't acting as a real soldier would.

bob 125th nysvi
03-23-2007, 02:18 PM
When I first moved to Texas I was shocked when a man I didn't know held the door open for me and couldn't help but laugh the first time I saw a cowboy actually tip his cowboy hat to me. It's so strange now when I go home and have doors shut on me because I expect the person in front of me to at least hold it until I take it.

you need to blame their mommas because they didn't raise their boys right.

My mom or dad would have decked me in a heartbeat if I didn't hold the door for a woman. Or give up my seat on the bus or ....

well you get the picture.

But there is no one to blame but their parents.

sbl
03-23-2007, 04:46 PM
Not bad for an Insurance Company....


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMwoexR1evo

Fenian
03-23-2007, 05:05 PM
Hey Scott, Thanks for posting that.I'm going to forward it to a couple of people. Bud Scully 13th NJ and 69th NY;)