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LewisSullivan
03-10-2007, 05:09 PM
Hey, I haven't posted on here for quite some time because of my busy winter *Chuckle*.. Anyway.

I was wondering if it is not to much trouble if anyone could list on here the 'basics' of what an assistant surgeon would carry on his person. My group is not to large and we don't typically do big battles so my impression would be that I am traveling with a patrol to meet with my Captain. We are up in Minnesota so its a little easier to get away with that then in say Virgina.

Anyways back to the topic if you have the time I would very much appreciate a short list of what you would call the minimum to start off with. Not that I want to go with that, but my budget is tight. Thanks for any and all help that is given.

- Lewis.

P.s. If you could give some good 'where to buy' sites that would be all the better. Thanks again for the help.

NoahBriggs
03-10-2007, 09:52 PM
Personal surgical kit. keyword, Ed Archer.

Bandages, rolled. key word JoAnn's fabrics

Rolled red felt. key word, JoAnn's Fabrics

Patient register, keyword, Office depot and your computer to make the label on the cover.

Bottle of opium pills

Bottle of bluemass

bottle of laudanum.

Optional: bottle of Spiritus Fortius.

Keywords for the four above, this conference, first post, read carefully.

Your haversack, mess furniture, blanket, rubber blanket, another haversack for your supplies above, and a canteen with a smooth blend of dihydrogen monoxide. That's corrosive stuff when it's under pressure, too, so be careful.

This model works. I know. I have done it.

Your new best friend should be Google Books. Keywords, Henry Beasley, John Erichsen and George Wood, fifth edition.

Rock and roll, chum. Google is goggling at you.

TimKindred
03-10-2007, 10:33 PM
Comrade,

What Noah said.......

Google and the search functions on the ACW boards are your best friends.

Respects,

hanktrent
03-11-2007, 07:34 AM
I know you said "on his person," but I'd add another thing he'd likely have with him in those circumstances: a horse.

That's looking at the question from a historical viewpoint rather than a reenacting viewpoint, though. It's generally customary to omit the horse for reenactments.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

NoahBriggs
03-12-2007, 10:27 AM
Optional: bottle of Spiritus Fortius.

That should be Spiritus Frumenti. Aka medicinal whiskey, used both to counteract the symptoms of shock, add flavoring to bad-tasting tonics and act as a preservative for vegetable-based medications. Thank you, Henry Beasley.

My flub! :(

TimKindred
03-12-2007, 11:33 AM
Comrade,

The only thing I would add to what Noah has listed is a couple or three disposable tourniquets.

Remember, your job is to use your skills to stabilise the wounded until they can be sent to the division field hospital, either on their own, or via ambulance, or, if the wound is slight, to treat it and return the man to his post.

Respects,

LewisSullivan
03-12-2007, 02:36 PM
Thanks for all the advise. The list is what I expected it to be.. Now looking around and talking with my units captain I was told I should get a wall tent (which is most likely a good idea for when I get the money to upgrade to a fuller persona). However is that accurate, because I find some cases where they might be in an 'A' Tent.. Can anyone explain?

Thanks
- Lewis

hanktrent
03-12-2007, 03:00 PM
That doesn't make sense. How would you transport either an A tent or a wall tent while "traveling with a patrol to meet with my Captain"?

Edited to add: logically, you'd be sleeping however they were, probably sharing a shelter half or with only a gum blanket and blanket. I've not actually hefted an A tent, but even if you cut the poles on site, I think it'd be pretty excessive to strap behind a saddle with everything else, and that's assuming you're traveling on horseback and not on foot.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

TimKindred
03-12-2007, 06:09 PM
Comrade,

The only time that you would have access to the Wall or Common tent would be in either a rear area where the regimental wagon(s) could be brought up, or in winter quarters.

From 1863 onwards, the US Army Regulations (rev 1863), PP514, para 41-47 inclusive lay out what equipment may be taken into the field by men and officers. They specify that 3 wall tents will be allowed to a regiment for use by the field grade officers and regimental staff. All officers of the rank of Captain and below are to be given one shelter tent (2 halves) each. Officers are to reduce their baggage to their blankets, a small valise and a small mess kit.

The Regulations are adamant that Hospital Tents are for the use of the sick and wounded, and not to be used for any other purpose. They are to shelter the patients, not the surgeon and his staff.

So basically, you have a dilema. You can bunk in with the regimental staff when (and if) the baggage wagon arrives, or you can carry a pair of shelter halves and roll up with the men.

I have found that a single, good quality blanket, and one or two painted or rubber blankets are more than sufficient in the field. I carry my blankets, a spare shirt and a pair of socks with a blankets strap set worn on my back. My haversack has my office supplies, my mess equipment and food, and my canteen has my water. The medical supplies I carry in a small black valise, and I have a kidney shaped canteen of quinine water. That's what i have. Anything else goes into my pockets.

All of this could also easily go on a horse.

Take what you need, need what you take.

Respects,

LewisSullivan
03-13-2007, 04:36 PM
Its a tad different since I am on the western side of things and we portray 1861-2. I agree that its odd that I would carry a Wall tent as I have little to no wounded since we rarly fight battles (at least as of yet, we do more each year).

TimKindred
03-13-2007, 05:21 PM
Its a tad different since I am on the western side of things and we portray 1861-2. I agree that its odd that I would carry a Wall tent as I have little to no wounded since we rarly fight battles (at least as of yet, we do more each year).


Comrade,

Theatre doesn;t matter so much. East, west, etc. All get the same stuff.

The Shelter tent begins issue in early 1862, the march/april time frame. By fall of '62. they are almost universal.

Now, having said that, the one item you can carry, if you absolutely MUST have canvas, is a tent fly. these were used to make lean-to's, shebangs and a variety of sheletrs in the field.

However, as an officer, even in 1861-1862, when you go into the field, odds are that you will have many nights without any other shelter than your blankets and rubber blankets. Welcome to management.

You can carry one or two wool, and a painted or rubber blanket easy enough, especially on horseback. It's pretty comfortable, and there are certainly ways of making a shelter if you really need one. In summertime, it's a rare occurence that you'll need more than one of each, and many an officer, even generals, recount sleeping with only a ground cloth and their saddle and blanket as pillow and ground sheet.

You'll do fine. Less is more, especially when you have to carry it.....

Respects,

hanktrent
03-13-2007, 05:31 PM
Its a tad different since I am on the western side of things and we portray 1861-2. I agree that its odd that I would carry a Wall tent as I have little to no wounded since we rarly fight battles (at least as of yet, we do more each year).

I guess what I'm getting at is... physically, how would you carry a wall tent or A tent while accompanying a patrol? I'm not talking theatre, year, its eventual usefulness, whether it was odd or common in army camps, etc. Just, literally, how?

If I'm picturing your original premise correctly, you're imagining something like this: On Friday afternoon, as you imagine it, you're called over to your commanding officer. He orders you to leave this evening and travel with a patrol to another area where your captain is, and you'll arrive Sunday evening. The only part that will actually be portrayed is after you leave with the patrol, and before you arrive, since there is no commanding officer, no captain, no larger encampment beyond the little patrol, etc.

So, in your imagination, you start packing your things up, in preparation to leave that evening, and that's how you decide what to have at the event which begins when you leave.

When you're loaded for traveling, you can list where things are: canteen over one shoulder, food in your haversack over the other shoulder, knapsack on your back with blanket and medicines, valise in your hand, or whatever, etc. etc.

With that picture in mind, where is the A tent or wall tent? If you're on foot, I'm just not seeing any room for it at all. If you're on horseback, at most an A tent without poles would fit, and that'd be pushing it.

Or maybe we're misunderstanding the original premise.

Edited to add: Looks like Tim and I were posting about the same thing at the same time. :)

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

LewisSullivan
03-23-2007, 07:17 PM
Hey, thanks for clearing that up I was off in reading your posts the first time. Anyway I agree with you and that saves me money *teehee*. I was hoping that would be the anwser as I told my captain this and now I can gloat. We do have a 'wagon' of sorts, but only use it in front of the public at 'battles' so we can justify the surgeons 'field hospital'. Anyway thanks again for all the help.

- Lewis