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View Full Version : You have to love Virginia...



wagen dawg
03-04-2007, 08:27 PM
We have a new law for next year: Teachers in public schools will no longer be able to withhold recess from a disruptive child unless the parents have given written consent.
The same lawmakers also rejected a bill that would require parental consent for kids 15 and under to use tanning salons.

Wow.

sbl
03-04-2007, 09:56 PM
Dawg,

You live there for crying out loud. You've got beautiful state spending tons of money on the 400th (from what I saw last summer), and a new senator that isn't a buffoon. Are you on your local school board, go to PTA meetings, or follow WHY your law makers came up with this law?

Forquer
03-04-2007, 10:56 PM
We have a new law for next year: Teachers in public schools will no longer be able to withhold recess from a disruptive child unless the parents have given written consent.
The same lawmakers also rejected a bill that would require parental consent for kids 15 and under to use tanning salons.

Wow.

When I told my elementary school teacher about this, her first question was "which one of the lawmakers has a kid who is being disruptive and not getting his recess?"

Bring back corporal punishment..........NOW!!!!!!!!!!!!

YOS,

DeoVinde11
03-05-2007, 03:53 AM
and then they wonder why the kids of today are out of control and disrespective, its cause they dont know what discipline is!

Union Navy
03-05-2007, 10:06 AM
What do they mean by "disruptive?" To reduce it to basics, children come in two flavors - farmers and hunters. Both had essential roles in early human societies. Farmers are more focused, orderly, organized and plan ahead - you can't be a successful farmer without these qualities. They tend to do well in school - a place where organization, logic and foresight are rewarded. Hunters are more chaotic- they are easily distracted by about anything, and learn best by getting directly involved, up and moving, involving all their senses. You can't be a successful hunter without the ability to move your attention rapidly around, noticing every movement and nuance. Our shcools were not made for such learners, and they are often termed disruptive. It is unrealistic to expect hunter types to sit all day and listen and read - it is against their nature. They need alternatives sometimes, and recess lets them burn off some of the frustration built up having to act like a farmer.

Lest you think I am speaking theoretically, I have both types of children. Our oldest is a hunter, but his early schooling at home accomodated this. Sometimes in the middle of a lesson he had to go outside and run around the house a few times. He functioned better after this. He is now a successful and popular high schooler (and Navy reenactor), but had to learn coping strategies over time. His first school also allowed him time to burn off energy and frustration. Our oldest daughter is a farmer. School is her element - she has never got anything but As in all 8 years of classes. She plans ahead, is organized and usually calm - the opposite of her brother. With such basic differences, trying to make them both learn the same way will be a lesson in frustration.

Where I work (a nature center), I have noticed that the "disruptive" students (usually hunters) do very well on our hikes. They see interesting things first, often before I do, and have personal experiences with nature they can share. The farmers tend to shy away from the lack of structure and predictability on a hike and in nature in general. To a farmer, nature is something to be tamed and made productive and predictable. Hunters are attuned to reading and exploiting the unpredictability of natural systems.

Our society needs both types of people in it.

chatrbug
03-09-2007, 07:25 AM
this is actually a federal law. by federal law children are to have so many minutes of recess per day (depending on the grade level depends on how many minutes)... therefore if the teacher takes away recess, then they are no longer following federal law.

same law makes it so that the school nurse has to check my childrens packed lunches from home to make sure they are a balanced meal... i say they need to check more of what they are serving. their meals are carb loaded, whereas i pack healthy, only some whole grain carbs, along with 1 sugary treat..she tried to throw a fit over that sugary treat. i had to bring up to her that the schools whole lunch carrys more sugar than that one little treat! gotta love how the government makes you think that you are raising your children, whereas they are actually taking more and more control every day.

Rob Weaver
03-09-2007, 10:45 AM
Another fresh reminder why my children are homeschooled. Oh, look at the clock: Time for recess! :D

sbl
03-09-2007, 11:56 AM
Poor kids...no "snow days". ;)

I was a teacher's aide once and had to call the parents when their kids had to stay after school. One parent was mad at me for giving his son detention until, as he told me; "I gave my boy a few licks with the belt and he confessed...so it was OK."

Pete K
03-09-2007, 12:09 PM
You can't win with some parents. Some see teachers as too strict expecting things like homework being done on time and neat, or to put their name on the paper ("...let him "express" himself with a false name..."). Some go to the other extreme. It is a fine line we walk. Now throw in high stakes testing, breakfast and lunch programs, measuring body mass index, providing floride for rural students, etc... Maybe some day I'll be able to teach History and Government, oh wait, that is my job title! After twenty years in the treches I've seen it all.

CivilWarBuff1863
03-09-2007, 12:14 PM
Ahhhh our American tax dollars at work. I don't know if giving up recess to kids in school is a wise thing but like all expieriments they should be tested and proven. Mad scientist beware! ;)

Rob Weaver
03-09-2007, 01:20 PM
Poor kids...no "snow days". ;)

I was a teacher's aide once and had to call the parents when their kids had to stay after school. One parent was mad at me for giving his son detention until, as he told me; "I gave my boy a few licks with the belt and he confessed...so it was OK."

Nope: And more than once they've had school on Saturday, or after 8pm at night, and (gasp) on Federal holidays, too!
In a situation like that, are you considered a "mandated reporter?" As clergy in the state in which I reside, I am, and have, on more than one occasion, had to go to bat for a child who was experiencing abusive conditions.