PDA

View Full Version : Packaging & Labeling Prescriptions



hanktrent
02-26-2007, 08:20 AM
If an individual soldier is given a prescription to take, while not actually confined to the hospital, how would it be packaged and labelled? I'm specifically interested in how a Union surgeon would be dispensing opium pills to prisoners of war for diarrhea, but it would probably be similar for any Union surgeon and any non-liquid medicine.

Would the pills just be in a folded paper packet with a label and/or instructions handwritten on it to take so many times per day? Or was there a specific military preprinted envelope with blanks to fill in or something like that?

There are lots of hospital-size containers for stocks of medicine, but I can't recall seeing an image of an original military individual prescription.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

TimKindred
02-26-2007, 08:45 AM
Hank,

You need to get hold of a copy of "Civil War Pharmacy" by Michael A. Flannery. Published by Pharmaceutical Products Press. ISBN 0-7890-1502-1. It's available in soft cover.

Appendix C; How To Read And Fill A Civil War Prescription, has everything you will need. It includes a glossary or terms and styles of prescriptions, how to make powders and pills, labels and how they should be made, etc. Very Very excellent reference section.

Basically, in short, powders and smaller prescriptions should be delivered in a paper, and the label should be a copy of the prescription, indicating the contents, dosage, and prescribing physician. It does not list the size of the papers, but states that uniformity of size is desireable, and gives directions for the proper folding of the paper(s).

Labels should be pasted to the package containg the papers, or in the case of a glass bottle, should be tied to the outside so as to facilitate the reuse of the bottle after the prescription is completed. The label, when tied, is to have the ends folded into a point, and and fastened with a tring to the bottle. It says that the same method may be employed for pill boxes, fastening it to the lower section so as to leave the lid free. Size is reccomended (for the label) as about 2" wide by 5-6" long.

The book is a very valuable reference, and well worth the money to purchase, which was, I believe, around 30.00 or so.

Respects,

NoahBriggs
02-26-2007, 08:56 AM
$410?? I got mine for about $30!

If you want, Hank, I would be happy to write up a prescription based on your research and send to you a paper envelope, which you can use.

TimKindred
02-26-2007, 09:02 AM
Noah.....

Sorry, I don't know how that 410.00 got in there. yeah, around 30 dollars or so.... Thanks for catching that. i edited the message to reflect the correct pricing.

Darned gremlins....

Respects,

hanktrent
02-26-2007, 10:07 AM
Basically, in short, powders and smaller prescriptions should be delivered in a paper, and the label should be a copy of the prescription, indicating the contents, dosage, and prescribing physician. It does not list the size of the papers, but states that uniformity of size is desireable, and gives directions for the proper folding of the paper(s).

Thank you! Very helpful. I need this for next weekend, so will need to make up something myself. Yeah, I put it off till the last minute. :(

So if it's a copy of the prescription, would it be something like:

Rx Pil. Opii gr ij
ter in die

Capt. John Smith
General Hospital, Beaufort S.C.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

TimKindred
02-26-2007, 12:03 PM
Hank,

yeah, that's pretty much it. If I can get this infernal scanner to work, I'll scan the image from the book and post it here.

Respects,

NoahBriggs
02-26-2007, 12:26 PM
Rx Pil. Opii gr ij
ter in die [or "t.i.d."]
Signatura [or "S."]
take 1 pill three times a day

Capt. John Smith
General Hospital, Beaufort S.C [date, in XX,XX,186X format]

Jas. Cox
04-08-2007, 11:41 AM
Hank,

You need to get hold of a copy of "Civil War Pharmacy" by Michael A. Flannery. Published by Pharmaceutical Products Press. ISBN 0-7890-1502-1. It's available in soft cover. ...

The book is a very valuable reference, and well worth the money to purchase, which was, I believe, around 30.00 or so.

Respects,

I just checked Amazon and it's Price: $23.07 & eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping.

Also, I'm new to this forum and just now allowed to post. I haven't checked all sections, so if this question is somewhere else, I apologize. Does anyone know of an Internet source where one can get FREE printable Federal Medical forms? Whether it be bottle labels, prescription forms, weather reports, whatever. I have created some of my own for medical bottles and some for suture needles, but I always want more for my persona and general interest.

NoahBriggs
04-08-2007, 12:27 PM
Edward Parrish's book on practical pharmacy has some good forms for writing prescriptions. Good ideas for labels, too.

A quick search on Google will bring up the Army Regs. You can print off the forms, but you should copy the forms into notebooks, which is how it was done.

Steward's manual has info on prescriptions.

"Doc" Nelson
04-08-2007, 01:16 PM
Does anyone know of an Internet source where one can get FREE printable Federal Medical forms? Whether it be bottle labels, prescription forms, weather reports, whatever. I have created some of my own for medical bottles and some for suture needles, but I always want more for my persona and general interest.

Jas.
One website you could try is: Making of America Books (http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/pageviewer-idx?c=moa;cc=moa;idno=agy4285.0001.001;q1=Revised% 20Regulations;frm=frameset;view=image;seq=320;page =root;size=s). This link is the first form listed. All you would need to do is, move you cursor over the form. After which, you'll see an icon appear in the top left corner of the form. The second icon from the left, should be a printer icon. Just left click on the printer icon and, you'll have a form. Just cut it down to size, if you'd like. Now, this wouldn't look too "accurate" though. That is, if you were planning on using them with your impression? But, they could still be printed out that way. It was easier for me to print them out, cut them down, then draw them into a register. I know that sounds like a "process and a half" but, it was just easier for me (for some reason). Oh, before I forget. This link, is for the first form listed in the Medical Regulations. For the remainder, all you need to do is, go to the top of the form and click on "next".

Just as Noah stated. The forms were hand written/drawn into a blank medical book/register. As for blank books, check out Sullivan Press (http://www.sullivanpress.com/Civil_war.htm), he has a ton of stuff, including blank books/registers that, you could create yourself. Good luck and, God speed.

Jas. Cox
04-08-2007, 07:11 PM
Jas.
One website you could try is: ...

Thanks to you and Noah Briggs for the information/links. I saved the forms as PDF files and downloaded the original GIF images. Much to review at a later time. If anyone wants copies of the medicine bottle labels, etc. that I created they are more than welcome to them. I would just have to figure a way of posting, e-mailing, whatever.

While I'm thinking about it, does anyone know where to get glassine envelopes? I wanted to put my "suture" needles and other such things in them. I have been to various places including craft and fabric stores and get blank stares when I ask if they have any.

I didn't see a place for this, though there may be. Here is a little background on my persona and reenactment beliefs.

Capt. Jas. Cox
Assistant surgeon

I am not a "thread counter" but I try to be as authentic as I can (though as a photographer I take my modern camera with me to record events). I believe while certain regulations were issued, that the military at that time wasn't today's General Issue (G.I.) military. It is difficult to say a character wouldn't have worn "that hat" or other piece of clothing, especially among officers. Many brought things from home, had bespoke articles of clothing. Some Federal forces wore gray at the beginning of the war with some disastrous consequences for them later.

I am not a member of any reenactment group for a number of reasons. The chief ones being:
I have found that at least local reenactment groups, don't particularly need medical reenactors as much as they do solders. They may not be against the idea, but they are not overwhelmed with excitement by it either.
I'm not big on groups. I like to do my thing, talk to people, come and go as I please and there aren't that many reenactments in my area, in my comfort zone.

I have a pretty complete gear package/uniform including MS sword. Winter wool/summer cotton pants. Various types of hats (slouch, forage, kepi, ....). Boots and brogans. Double instrument roll-up, some reproduction medial instruments. I try to only have period instruments, but my scalpel is all stainless and I realize that isn't accurate.

I am going to start on a private's infantry uniform in honor of my great, great, great, grandfather (or uncle, we haven't totally figured that one out yet) William Haas volunteer for the Indiana 53rd Company I.

I think this information sums up where I'm coming from and my interests. I'm also a little obsessive at times about completion.

If there is a different are for this, someone please point it out and if I can edit this part out I will and repost it in the appropriate place.

I hope to learn a lot from this forum and thank you all again and in advance for future help.

Now to try and find out why my avatar keeps saying it's too big.

hanktrent
04-08-2007, 10:24 PM
While I'm thinking about it, does anyone know where to get glassine envelopes? I wanted to put my "suture" needles and other such things in them.

They used to be used for holding photographic negatives, back when I was into photography 10-15 years ago. Don't know if they're still available for that purpose in camera stores.

Are you wanting it for use as a repro Civil War item? If so, I'm curious if you have information that glassine envelopes were used in the period. This page shows a few needles in papers or leather http://www.braceface.com/medical/Civil_War_Articles/suture_needles.htm and another set in leather http://drl.ohsu.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/hom&CISOPTR=862&CISOBOX=1&REC=3 which of course doesn't indicate that glassine wasn't used.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

TimKindred
04-08-2007, 11:32 PM
Hank,

That soft leather looks very much like what I use. I have some nice heavy cotton bunting that I was able to salvage from some 19th century political banners. (The banners were beyond salvage, so I cut what material I could save for future use). I have a piece of this in white which I use to hold my needles.

I also made a nice paper packet from some thin slick brown paper that I slide the cloth and needles into. I coated the paper packet with a sizing material and affixed a label to the outside.

I also molded up a couple of pieces of bone wax from some pure beeswax I obtained at a craft store. I have plenty of black silk thread, but I hope at some point to find some nice silver wire.

Respects,

celtfiddler
04-09-2007, 07:29 AM
While I'm thinking about it, does anyone know where to get glassine envelopes?


Have you tried a stamp collecting shop? If they're the envelopes that are popping in my mind right now--way back when my dad got us kids into the hobby briefly we used to get stamps from one of the local shops in the envelopes.


but I hope at some point to find some nice silver wire

Try contacting a local jeweler who does repairwork. They might be willing to sell you a small quantity or help you contact their supplier.

Jas. Cox
04-09-2007, 08:38 AM
They used to be used for holding photographic negatives, back when I was into photography 10-15 years ago. Don't know if they're still available for that purpose in camera stores.
Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

Hank,

I still have some of those negative sleeves from my photography, but they aren't wide enough for my purpose even if I slit them open. I did get a sheet of stamps from the post office in a large (8.5 x11) glassine envelope which I cut down. However, I think a premade smaller one would look better. This would indicate that a stamp collecting place might carry such items as mentioned in a later post. I do in fact want them for reproduction purposes. I have found an image that indicates they came from the manufacturer in such envelopes. I believe the images in the leather and such are in actual field use storage. Although they may have also come in other sorts of paper from different manufacturers. Sterilization of course wasn't a concern. Thanks for everyone's input.

Another question arises (always!). Does anyone know a good way to make a suture card? I have silk suture, but it is currently on its original wooden spool which doesn't fit easily in my roll-up bag.

hanktrent
04-09-2007, 08:57 AM
I still have some of those negative sleeves from my photography, but they aren't wide enough for my purpose even if I slit them open.

Have you checked into negative envelopes for large format film? That's what I was thinking of--4"x5", 5"x7", 8"x10".


I have found an image that indicates they came from the manufacturer in such envelopes.

Could you share that? Or tell where it's printed? I've not run across anything else packaged in glassine in the period, and would have assumed that glassine was a later development.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

Jas. Cox
04-09-2007, 10:23 AM
Have you checked into negative envelopes for large format film? That's what I was thinking of--4"x5", 5"x7", 8"x10".



Could you share that? Or tell where it's printed? I've not run across anything else packaged in glassine in the period, and would have assumed that glassine was a later development.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

1. I'm absolutely wrong. I think I just had it in my mind they were glassine and never rechecked the image. :( It looks more like brown paper. I have the image downloaded and don't remember it's origin. I was trying to find a reference to glassine to see when it was invented and I found a [first used with potato chip packaging in 1926.] It may have been used earlier as well, but I doubt 1860s. Thus ends my need for glassine.
2. I don't know if any photography places that sell/use glassine anymore. It's all archival plastic. Even that is dying because of digital. I did see some listings for it like on places like eBay when I was searching for glassine's origin. But again, now not needed. Sorry to have wasted time.
3. I do have a neat original type needle label however that I recreated from that package.

1863doc
04-09-2007, 03:17 PM
Jas;

I did a fast google search for "glassine envelopes" and got a lot of hits. Here are some that came up: http://www.blissweddingsmarket.com/store/000110.htm

http://www.clearbags.com/?category%7CGLAS

http://www.paper-source.com/cgi-bin/paper/video/glassine_envelopes.html

the following site shows glassine paper not being invented till 1905 so another form of paper must have been used:

http://www.cycleback.com/printsexamination/sixteen.html

I tore alot of those type of envelopes open in the emergency room over the years. Never thought they would be hard to find.
1863doc

Jas. Cox
04-09-2007, 03:55 PM
Thanks yeah, I already discovered that I made an error and that it was some other type of paper. Thank you for the links anyway.

"Doc" Nelson
04-09-2007, 03:56 PM
Jas. Cox . . I sent you a "PM". ;)

bizzilizzit
04-18-2007, 01:34 PM
While I'm thinking about it, does anyone know where to get glassine envelopes?

You can get Glassine from a company called METAL EDGE in 3 different sizes:
www.metaledgeinc.com
Elizabeth

Jas. Cox
04-18-2007, 02:03 PM
You can get Glassine from a company called METAL EDGE in 3 different sizes:
www.metaledgeinc.com
Elizabeth

Thank you for the website. It got me to thinking maybe Light Impressions has some as well and they do:

http://www.lightimpressionsdirect.com/servlet/OnlineShopping?Dsp=2

Unfortunately, now that I have found sources I find they are a post CW item. :eek: