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NoahBriggs
01-31-2007, 06:24 AM
From John Erichsen's Art and Science of Surgery pp. 31-32:

The treatment to be adopted on the occurrence of dangerous symptoms, or the apparent death from choloroform, is as follows:

1. The administration of the vapor must at once be discontinued.

2. The tongue should be seized with the fingers, with a hook or forceps, and drawn out of the mouth; and the larynx pushed up so that the glottis may be opened.

3. Fresh air should be admitted around the patient by opening doors and windows, and by preventing bystanders or spectators from crowding around.

4. All constriction should be removed from the patient's throat and chest, and these parts freely exposed.

5. Artificial respiration must at once and without delay be set up, whilst these other measures are being carried out, either by the surgeon applying his mouth to the patient's lips and thus breathing into the chest; or, what is preferable, by the alternate and steady compression and relaxation of the walls of the patient's chest.

6. Electricity should be applied freely over the heart and diaphragm through to the spine, by means of Electro-Magnetic or other convenient apparatus. [my emphasis added]

7. Friction may be employed to the extremities; a little brandy rubbed inside the mouth; and cold water dashed on the face, as accessory means.

Some of that sounds familiar.

1863doc
02-01-2007, 03:51 PM
What year was the book written? The highlight instructions sound close to the first attempts at CPR with a defibrillator. The idea of moving the tongue is close to the digital intubation I was taught 20 years ago.


1863doc

NoahBriggs
02-01-2007, 08:28 PM
It was published in 1860. :D

1863doc
02-01-2007, 08:46 PM
Noah;
it sounded so modern, it caught me off guard.

Thanks again
1863doc

NoahBriggs
02-01-2007, 09:08 PM
Look for yourself on page 32 -33 (http://www.hti.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?sid=5e7feb54b8c47661025ef116be1245ce;idno=ajw7 572.0001.001;c=moa;cc=moa;q1=tonsils;q2=removed;vi ew=toc).

Whatever it takes to prove the medicine of the era was not so out of date. Remember, even though it shows up in a surgical manual, it does not mean it is standard information which would be known by all surgeons.

Like I say, more interesting tidbits to come as I come across them in my research.