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View Full Version : Looking for reenactors to interview for college paper...



lineway
02-10-2006, 04:42 PM
I'm sorry, I didn't know where to post this, I hope it's alright I put it here. I am currently a senior in college, writing my history seminar paper on living history and civil war reenactors. I need up to 20 interviews with reenactors and would love to hear stories from any of you concerning the topic. I ask for either an email or phone interview; it won't be too long. My questions are mainly going to be about you as a reenactor. I would love to hear stories of anything concerning civil war reenacting-- I am greatly interested in what you all have to say--civil war reeanacting is something I did not know a tremendous amount on before my seminar class, but now have become greatly interested in.

This is a pressing matter to me...I would love to get as many interviews as I can today and tomorrow (Sunday would be alright as well)...If any of you are interested in being interviewed (a phone interview would probably take fifteen minutes, while the email interview would take as long as you need) please email me at lineway@hotmail.com as soon as possible. If you are willing to do a phone interview still please email me and we can figure out the rest.

Thank you all for your time.
Christine

lineway
02-10-2006, 04:48 PM
I apologize, I also forgot to mention that I would be more than happy to send you a copy of my paper when I am finished with it. My seminar paper is the most important piece of writing I do in college for it will help me attain my degree in history.

Thank you all for your time again.
Christine

Chuck A Luck
02-11-2006, 10:44 AM
I'll be glad to try to help you out.
Sent you an email with contact info and a few pix.

Radar
02-13-2006, 07:30 AM
Sent you an email with contact information at 1500 Eastern Time with no response yet.

Are you still interested?

Radar
02-14-2006, 12:14 PM
Is this another one of those "goblins" that appear periodically? I sent her an email and also posted here, with no response. It seems like these pop up from time to time, people volunteer to help, then, whaamy, no response from the poster. Guess we shouldn't waste our time on these folks, as they don't seem to appreciate it. :roll:

Chuck A Luck
02-14-2006, 02:52 PM
I also never got a response. :?

Mich8th
02-14-2006, 07:17 PM
Well I guess I wasn't the only one with no responce from this person. :( Maybe they have had a good responce before we tried. :shock: But as you and I know you can never learn enough, especially from such a vast bunch of people who have different impressions, their loss. :D

Radar
02-15-2006, 07:08 AM
I answered one other in the past and it took her about a week to answer. "I'm sorry, I was busy, you know how school is", was her response, and several others didn't take time to say thanks, I've got enough responces. After this one, I quit being nice and answering, since they don't have enough courtesy to reply in any way.

lineway
02-20-2006, 06:44 PM
I apologize to everyone who emailed me...I have now sent you all an email concerning an interview. It was very rude of me to not respond right away-- I had a family emergency that needed tending to and had to put this research paper on hold for a week. There is no excuse for me not emailing you all back though and I apologize for offending anyone.

I am most certainly grateful you all emailed me and are kind enough to take time out of your schedule for my paper. I am a very respectful person and am deeply sorry for not getting back to you all right away.

I am greatly interested in what you do and I hope that you forgive my rudeness.

I also hope there is no confusion about me not responding because I had enough people to interview...that is not the case. No matter what I will respond to your email because the more interviews I have, the broader my research paper will be. I am interested as to what everyone has to say concerning reenacting.

I hope you will accept my apology and I look forward to reading your respones to my questions through email.

Christine

lineway
02-20-2006, 06:53 PM
Sir, I apologize for not responding to you sooner. I made a post apolgizing, but I read what you wrote and I thought I would tell you thank you for being interested in my research paper. I am sorry you had problems with people before about this and I apologize for not getting to you sooner. I appreciate greatly your help and wealth of knowledge or else I would not be trying to research what you do. The person who interviewed you before and said that they were busy with school was very rude and should not have said that. What I did was rude as well, but I hope you know that I did not email you sooner because I didn't feel like it...I am truly sorry for not responding faster.

I hope you accept my apology...

lineway
02-20-2006, 06:55 PM
I have responded to your email and I thank you very much for taking time out of your schedule to respond to my request. Please read my post as to why I did not email you sooner. I apologize for being extremely rude and I hope you will still participate in my paper. Thank you. I 100% agree with you on having many different perspectives. I want as many different views on what you do. Multiple perspectives is crucial for history.

Thank you again!

lineway
02-20-2006, 06:57 PM
I have now emailed you. Thank you very much for your participation and I hope to hear from you when you have time. I apologize for not responding sooner...please read my post about it if you would like.

Thank you and I am sorry for my rudeness!

Mich8th
02-20-2006, 09:23 PM
Your appoligy is accepted and I have sent you your answers to the questions, I hope everything is OK with the Family and will help more if you need it. :D

vtgunlock
03-09-2006, 10:59 AM
Hi,

Feel free to give me a call. This is the 50th (yup you read right) year in Civil War studies/reenactments, battlefield guide, living history etc, You might also want to connect with Prof. Kevin Thornton at the U of Vermont.
He teaches an entire unit on the evolution of Civil War reenactments on current perceptions of history. My office number is 802.846-2344. Best of luck on this!

Cordially,

YerObyServt.

Priv.Steven Gunlock 3erd VT Vols (The "Hemlocks"), First Vt Lt Artillery, First Vt Cav, member Co of Military Historians. Staff: "On the Road with Charles Ka." (CBS)

Lightningslinger
04-25-2008, 02:15 PM
II am... writing my history seminar paper on living history and civil war reenactors. I need up to 20 interviews with reenactors and would love to hear stories from any of you concerning the topic.... I would love to hear stories of anything concerning civil war reenacting-- I am greatly interested in what you all have to say--civil war reeanacting is something I did not know a tremendous amount on before my seminar class, but now have become greatly interested in. lineway@hotmail.com as soon as possible. If you are willing to do a phone interview still please email me and we can figure out the rest.

Thank you all for your time.
Christine

Christine,

Have you published your 2006 seminar paper on "Living History and Civil War Re-enactors"? Some of us would care to have a read of it should you care to make it available please.

Tks,
Walt

Duff
04-25-2008, 02:59 PM
May I suggest you read the book "confederates in the attic" its about hardcore reenacting and is a very interesting read.

Lightningslinger
04-25-2008, 03:08 PM
May I suggest you read the book "confederates in the attic" its about hardcore reenacting and is a very interesting read.

The one by Tony Horwitz out of Random House? It's on one of my bookshelves. Can't miss that florescent green paperback spine cover.

While we're on the subject.... What did you think about the National Civil War Museum (NCWM) wanting to discuss setting up a re-enactors' archive as referred to in the "Sheep Coming Home" post? Thus far this thread has had Nada replies on the military board as compared to half a dozen or so on the Civilian forum.

Do you suppose is it a keepsake issue and the majority (not all) of military re-enactors aren't necessarily into scrap-booking the history and development of their own emulative past? Others I have spoken to off-line seem to be of that opinion. Time will tell. As others here have noted there is no central repository that covers the history of re-enacting. The NCWM thinks the idea has merit. Do we?

Walt

hanktrent
04-25-2008, 05:32 PM
Do you suppose is it a keepsake issue and the majority (not all) of military re-enactors aren't necessarily into scrap-booking the history and development of their own emulative past? Others I have spoken to off-line seem to be of that opinion. Time will tell. As others here have noted there is no central repository that covers the history of re-enacting. The NCWM thinks the idea has merit. Do we?

What I'd hope is that reenactors see their primary focus as memorializing the people of the 1860s, not themselves. If someone outside of the hobby decides to study it as a social phenomenon, okay, fine, whatever.

But to take up potential museum space and funding to house memorabilia about how we supposedly remembered others? Way too much emphasis there on the "we" instead of the "others," for me to have any interest.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

bill watson
04-26-2008, 09:56 AM
"But to take up potential museum space and funding to house memorabilia about how we supposedly remembered others? Way too much emphasis there on the "we" instead of the "others," for me to have any interest."

Remember, though, that there is a faction or school of thought within NPS and perhaps academia as well that believes how we remember the past is worthy of not only study but preservation. A few years back there was a plan at Gettysburg NMP to base a lot of interpretation on the 1880s era when many of the monuments went up. I disremember the details, because like other traumatic things I try and succeed to put it out of memory, but it was going to produce some strange results on the field. It has largely been put aside and you're seeing the battlefield nicely restored to its 1863 appearance -- except nobody is talking about removing all those memorials, so you have to have some explanation for folks of when they came about and what it means in the post-war era, why there are so many federal unit monuments, etc.

We're an extension of that, a phenomenon that at its heart tries to recreate some degree of the experience for our own and others edification. Our goal may be a mix of "we want to understand," "we want to show" and "we want to honor the memory," but it relies on something other than monuments. Its ephemeral nature is in itself interesting to some folks. And if we argue amongst ourselves about what the real purpose is and the best way of doing it, it's probably nothing more than the arguments in the 1880s and 1890s about what part of the regiment's fight should see the monument, how much should be spent on it, where the money should come from, etc. There were undoubtedly those who felt the money for a monument should be spent on relief for stricken veterans, etc. There were those who probably decried the ambition of monument committee leaders as evidence of insincerity and unworthiness. It was probably as fascinating to a real outsider as anything we do now.

But you're right, Hank, it might be interesting, but most of us step away from the idea that the spotlight should be on us rather than the old boys. And no one should expect us to put the spotlight on us; that would indeed be a job for an outsider.

Lightningslinger
04-26-2008, 10:29 AM
What I'd hope is that reenactors see their primary focus as memorializing the people of the 1860s, not themselves. If someone outside of the hobby decides to study it as a social phenomenon, okay, fine, whatever...But to take up potential museum space and funding to house memorabilia about how we supposedly remembered others? Way too much emphasis there on the "we" instead of the "others," for me to have any interest.

Hank Trent

Hank,

It is apparent that you want to focus on the actual enactors and not the re-enactors. You have a valid opinion and I won't dispute your position.

In fact, with no little embarrassment, when asked to autograph copies of my centennial reprint of a veteran-produced 1896 "History of the Signal Corps, USA, in the War of the Rebellion" I declined. It wasn't something I did. It was something I had re-produced. I didn't physically print or bind the new facsimile addition myself - just paid to have someone else do it.

On the other hand, I didn't think it out of the way when a fellow re-enactor, and support leader of battlefield preservation, thought it acceptable to sign copies of someone else's work in a Primedia tent sometime back because it had an image of the re-enactor on the cover of the work.

While on the subject, in this thread is a referral by Duff to the 1998 tome "Confederates in the Attic". It is noteworthy that Ernesto Serna or Che uses a quote from this work as his handle, viz:

"...I'm struck by the contradiction at the core of Civil War reenacting. On the surface it's a hyper-macho hobby, focused on guns and battle. But the longer I hang out with hardcores ... the more they remind me of supermodels, chatting endlessly about their jackets and shoes and hair and how many pounds they've lost since the last event." - Tony Horwitz

I’m sure Tony accurately described what he saw on the surface but both you and I know, however, that he didn’t see and know all there was to know about what re-enactors do and why they do it. In fact, in some instances, many of the we may not have a grasp of all the reasons why we do what we do. And certainly, the ramifications can be much more abstract than the known reasons can’t they?

Back to the issue -------

Amongst the many re-enactors participate in events, often it is to focus attention, to memorialize and to instill an awareness of the Boys of '61 and, in an ever-growing frequency, to events relating to the home front, or what had transformed such into a ravaged home front.

I needn’t tell our readers here that a repository is a place to gather related subjects under one roof so as to make it convenient for research purposes. But aren’t re-enactors researchers too? Of course they are. But if I asked you to come up with a source for re-enacting firearm safety issues or those involving the development of quartermaster distribution methods at events, where would you look? Although many of us have been privy to conversations with emulators of the 1860’s “chatting endlessly about their jackets and shoes and hair and how many pounds they've lost since the last event.", there have been others in our community discussing the merits of what constitutes effective staff/event management issues and how the execution of same may be brought closer to an 1860’s reality in order to benefit subsequent productions (may seem like a trite word to use here but, but like it or not, that's what they actually are).


What I'd hope is that … If someone outside of the hobby decides to study it as a social phenomenon, okay, fine, whatever.

A growing number of groups, formerly raised to be re-enactor staffs (emulating the things that their 1860's counterparts once did), have taken to becoming uniformed event co-ordinators. This phenomenon gained momentum during the 125th series because certain modern-attired event organizers bemoaned of being understaffed and cried that the events would fail if the re-enactors didn’t step in. Your “If someone outside of the hobby decides to study it as a social phenomenon,” may likely never occur along this tread simply because there is probably no place where this information currently lives – except in our memories. Many event co-ordinator/re-enactor staffers now proudly lay claim to ‘sacrificing themselves’ for the common-good of attending re-enactors and to insure a 'quality' event. A more recent acronym ... events-for-us-by-us or EFUBU, I believe, although such can actually be traced to be a direct outgrowth of the 125th.


… Remember… there is a faction or school of thought within NPS and perhaps academia as well that believes how we remember the past is worthy of not only study but preservation….

…We're an extension of that, a phenomenon that at its heart tries to recreate some degree of the experience for our own and others edification. Our goal may be a mix of "we want to understand," "we want to show" and "we want to honor the memory," but it relies on something other than monuments. Its ephemeral nature is in itself interesting to some folks. And if we argue amongst ourselves about what the real purpose is and the best way of doing it, it's probably nothing more than the arguments in the 1880s and 1890s about what part of the regiment's fight should see the monument, how much should be spent on it, where the money should come from, etc….

The Internet is a wonderful place to discuss recent events and compare the past with what is currently happening – how the art of making appearances and evolutions seem more true-to-life at events. And what's more, we see veins of such gems popping up with increased frequency. These occasional gems may be mined from such discussions; gems that can be preserved for the benefit of future re-enactors – especially assist those eager souls who would otherwise show up at an event as a spectator on sutler row ready to sound "The CHARGE!" it.

Cyber-text is not paper-text and Internet forums are not permanent repositories. How far have we as a community of re-enactors have we come. Reflect on how many links you’ve clicked on only to find that the link is broken and the content has disappeared. Some wheels may be worth re-inventing while others are needlessly ‘re-created’.

73,
Walt

tompritchett
04-27-2008, 07:24 PM
Have you published your 2006 seminar paper on "Living History and Civil War Re-enactors"? Some of us would care to have a read of it should you care to make it available please.

Considering that Christine's last log in to this forum was in February, I do not think that she is monitoring this forum any more. I did drop her an email stating that some members have expressed interest in seeing her finished product but it is her option on whether or not she decides to respond.

Lightningslinger
04-28-2008, 12:45 PM
Considering that Christine's last log in to this forum was in February, I do not think that she is monitoring this forum any more. I did drop her an email stating that some members have expressed interest in seeing her finished product but it is her option on whether or not she decides to respond.

Thanks for your willingness to contact Christine off-line Tom. Who knows? She might find all of this exciting and want to re-open her research efforts on account of this thread.

Pssss! That was February the 10th of 2006 for Christine's first entry Tom. You don't mind 'newbies' researching back that far in order to come up with a discussion topic do you? ;)

Cheers,
Walt

tompritchett
04-28-2008, 01:55 PM
Pssss! That was February the 10th of 2006 for Christine's first entry Tom.

:oops:You are so correct. I looked up her last activity in the profile and saw the month but did not pay attention to the year. Given, the fact that her last post was over 2 years ago, it makes it even more unlikely that we will ever hear from her.