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LioZac0261
06-08-2012, 04:10 PM
Gentlemen,

I got a D-Guard Bowie knife as a gift, made by Atlanta Cutlery Corp.: http://www.atlantacutlery.com/p-841-d-guard-bowie-knife.aspx.

However, the scabbard doesn't have a swivel or belt loop, so carrying it is kind of difficult. I found this photo showing some kind of "rig" made by a Confederate soldier. I looks to be either a cotton or canvas strap; with one end to the scabbard, and the other tied around a bracer button under the belt: http://www.flickr.com/photos/library_of_congress/6987389225/.

Even though that scabbard clearly has a swivel, I think I can make the same thing. Any thoughts, suggestions, input?

Radar
06-08-2012, 04:49 PM
Why do you want to carry the extra weight?

LioZac0261
06-08-2012, 04:59 PM
Why do you want to carry the extra weight?

I would like to use it in-camp, for demonstration purposes (especially early- mid-war). I wouldn't carry it while skirmishing. After all, it'd be a waste just sitting in my room.

You're right though, many soldiers tossed them due to their weight.

Ross L. Lamoreaux
06-08-2012, 08:42 PM
Let me preface this statement with the thought that it is a good thing that you are attempting to justify an impression by utiizing period images. A period image is worth a few period words. That said, you need to look at a wider selection of images and not just one uncommon one. You'll find that the majority of scabbards were simplistic affairs. Sure, there are plenty of scabbards with swivels, loops, special rivets, etc, but keep digging and look at images - you'll start seeing the other more common and easier to manufacture scabbards without all the bells and whistles. I also offer this unsolicited advice that I've seen being offered by folks with more knowledge than I have:
"Rather than try to find a period picture that shows what you want, find pictures of how the common men did it and strive to look like them"

LioZac0261
06-08-2012, 10:10 PM
Let me preface this statement with the thought that it is a good thing that you are attempting to justify an impression by utiizing period images. A period image is worth a few period words. That said, you need to look at a wider selection of images and not just one uncommon one. You'll find that the majority of scabbards were simplistic affairs. Sure, there are plenty of scabbards with swivels, loops, special rivets, etc, but keep digging and look at images - you'll start seeing the other more common and easier to manufacture scabbards without all the bells and whistles. I also offer this unsolicited advice that I've seen being offered by folks with more knowledge than I have:
"Rather than try to find a period picture that shows what you want, find pictures of how the common men did it and strive to look like them"

Oh, well, it's not a new scabbard I want to make. My fault, I should've been less ambiguous.

I have the scabbard pictured in the first link. It's just plain, nothing on it to secure it. It's too heavy just to tuck into my belt, because it just slides out. I'm trying to find an easier way of carrying it, especially from the belt.

Curt-Heinrich Schmidt
06-08-2012, 11:16 PM
Hallo!

By referencing the surviving artifact pool of Period "bowie" style knives- in brief and to over generalize...

You will find two basic routes to explore.

The first are the professional and commercial made "bowies" made by American and British cutlery firms. For example, the Sheffield England knife industry. These tend to be finer examples, and their scabbards or sheaths tend to have metal fittings such as metal throats and tips. Often the throats have studs that went in a sliding belt frog.

The second group are more so-called "primitive" bowie knives made by local knifesmiths, blacksmiths, and for the 1861-1862 Confederate short sword/bowie knife (and D-guard) fad even by some Confederate arsenals.

Among this group, and perhaps more illustrative of the short sword "bowie" replica you have, there are three basic "styles" or forms of sheaths:

1. Those with a belt loop that extends above the throat of the two piece or folded over one piece sheath.
2. Those with a belt tab sewn to the back of the two piece of folded over sheath below the throat line.
3. Those where the back piece of the two piece sheath extends above the throat line and has two narrow cut-out slots for a waistbelt to pass through.

Curt

packrat
06-09-2012, 10:26 AM
Like those before me I had the same questions... now does the sheath have a stud at the hilt end?? if so you could try modifying a British enfield bayonet scabberd frog.....not a hard process..had to do it for my Ames Riflemans Knife.. also notice that the fellow in your reference image has sewn a shoulder strap to his double billet belt...probably had problems with his knife pulling down the belt on the march....things will happen..... just my two cents worth of observation..YHS Paul Lopes

LioZac0261
06-11-2012, 01:43 AM
Here's the finished product. I tried to follow the original photo as closely as I could.

I got some natural all-cotton strapping from a local fabric store. I then folded it in half, to about 0.5'', and straight-stitched the edge.

After that it was just a matter of tying it tight (about 1'' to 1.5'' from the throat), and cutting/sewing it to the right length. The top of the throat should hang just below the belt, when secured to a bracer button.

Front: http://www.flickr.com/photos/66396919@N02/7360630172/in/photostream/
Back: http://www.flickr.com/photos/66396919@N02/7360630670/in/photostream (http://www.flickr.com/photos/66396919@N02/7360630670/in/photostream/lightbox/)

Curt-Heinrich Schmidt
06-11-2012, 10:49 AM
Hallo!

IMHO...

You may come find such a suspension system a wee bit "flimsy."

If you are sitting posing for an image, it may be fine. But unless you wrap it around many times and wrap and tie it around the waistbelt many times, it will sway and bounce at a walk and go flipping and flopping at a run?

Curt

LioZac0261
06-11-2012, 05:23 PM
Hallo!

IMHO...

You may come find such a suspension system a wee bit "flimsy."

If you are sitting posing for an image, it may be fine. But unless you wrap it around many times and wrap and tie it around the waistbelt many times, it will sway and bounce at a walk and go flipping and flopping at a run?

Curt

I was wondering the same. I'll test it this weekend at Secessionville, doubt I'll carry it while skirmishing.